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George Eliot

British Author
Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the GoodReads database with this name. See this thread for more information. Mary Ann (Marian) Evans, better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist. She was one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. Her novels, largely set in provincial England, are well known for their realism and psychological perspicacity.She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works were taken seriously. Female authors published freely under their own names, but Eliot wanted to ensure that she was not seen as merely a writer of romances. An additional factor may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny and to prevent scandals attending her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes. They lived together as man and wife, but Lewes was unable to divorce his wife from his failed marriage.See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_E...
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Quotes by George Eliot
It is never too late to be what you might have been
Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it. And if I was a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns.

And certainly, the mistakes that we male and female mortals make when we have our own way might fairly raise some wonder that we are so fond of it.

by George Eliot
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Miss Brooke had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress.

by George Eliot
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Poor fellow! I think he is in love with you.' I am not aware of it. And to me it is one of the most odious things in a girl's life, that there must always be some supposition of falling in love coming between her and any man who is kind to her... I have no ground for the nonsensical vanity of fancying everybody who comes near me is in love with me.

by George Eliot
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The difficult task of knowing another soul is not for young gentlemen whose consciousness is chiefly made up of their own wishes.

by George Eliot
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Do we not wile away moments of inanity or fatigued waiting by repeating some trivial movement or sound, until the repetition has bred a want, which is incipient habit?

by George Eliot
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But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.

by George Eliot
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I like not only to be loved, but also to be told that I am loved. I am not sure that you are of the same mind. But the realm of silence is large enough beyond the grave. This is the world of light and speech, and I shall take leave to tell you that you are very dear.

by George Eliot
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A friend is one to whom one may pour out the contents of one's heart, chaff and grain together, knowing that gentle hands will take and sift it, keep what is worth keeping, and with a breath of kindness, blow the rest away.

by George Eliot
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There's folks 'ud stand on their heads and then say the fault was i' their boots.

by George Eliot
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It is easy to say how we love new friends, and what we think of them, but words can never trace out all the fibers that knit us to the old.

by George Eliot
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I like not only to be loved, but also to be told I am loved.

by George Eliot
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The reward of one duty is the power to fulfill another.

by George Eliot
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What do we live for, if not to make life less difficult for each other?

by George Eliot
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All the learnin' my father paid for was a bit o' birch at one end and an alphabet at the other.

by George Eliot
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Blessed is the man, who having nothing to say, abstains from giving wordy evidence of the fact.

by George Eliot
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The intense happiness of our union is derived in a high degree from the perfect freedom with which we each follow and declare our own impressions.

by George Eliot
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Might, could, would - they are contemptible auxiliaries.

by George Eliot
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Death is the king of this world: 'Tis his park where he breeds life to feed him. Cries of pain are music for his banquet.

by George Eliot
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Whether happiness may come or not, one should try and prepare one's self to do without it.

by George Eliot
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Ignorant kindness may have the effect of cruelty; but to be angry with it as if it were direct cruelty would be an ignorant unkindness.

by George Eliot
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One must be poor to know the luxury of giving!

by George Eliot
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It is a common enough case, that of a man being suddenly captivated by a woman nearly the opposite of his ideal.

by George Eliot
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Different taste in jokes is a great strain on the affections.

by George Eliot
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Excessive literary production is a social offense.

by George Eliot
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When death, the great reconciler, has come, it is never our tenderness that we repent of, but our severity.

by George Eliot
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