My gut feelings and my faith tell me that until God shuts a door, no human can shut it.

It is smarter to borrow from nature than to reinvent the wheels.

Basketball is in my blood. It is my obligation to try.

I always keep a ball in the car. You never know.

The hardship of living in a refugee camp made me psychologically strong.

It's kind of chased away a few demons for me and, um, it's educated me a little bit more.

 image quote by Chinua Achebe

If you don't like someones story, write your own.

We will not, on the altar of money, mortgage our conscience, mortgage our faith, mortgage our salvation.

A hungry man is an angry one.

Unfortunately, the true force which propels our endless political disputes, our constant struggles for political advantage, is often not our burning concern for democracy, it is often of our dedication to the principle of the rule of law.

Corruption, the greatest single bane of our society today.

We will work to bring an element of stability to the price of oil.

I am a black man inside and outside and you are white men on the outside, but inside, you are Africans like me.

 image quote by Chinua Achebe

A man who makes trouble for others is also making trouble for himself.

My background playing soccer gave me a natural advantage over many of the American-born players.

I remember at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Shaq always wanted me to show him steps over and over.

Well, the first thing is that truth and power for me form an antithesis, an antagonism, which will hardly ever be resolved. I can define in fact, can simplify the history of human society, the evolution of human society, as a contest between power and freedom.

Well, first of all I'll say that I come alive best in theater.

Very conscious of the fact that an effort was being made to destroy my mind, because I was deprived of books, deprived of any means of writing, deprived of human companionship. You never know how much you need it until you're deprived of it.

There's something about the theater which makes my fingertips tingle.

There's a kind of dynamic quality about theater and that dynamic quality expresses itself in relation to, first of all, the environment in which it's being staged; then the audience, the nature of the audience, the quality of the audience.

There are different kinds of artists and very often, I'll be very frank with you, I wish I were a different kind.

The novel, for me, was an accident. I really don't consider myself a novelist.

See, even despite pious statements to the contrary, much of the industrialized world has not yet come to terms with the recognition of the fallacy of what I call the strong man syndrome.

Power is domination, control, and therefore a very selective form of truth which is a lie.

One, a mass movement from within, which, as you know, is constantly being put down brutally but which, again, regroups and moves forward as is happening right now as we are speaking.

One thing I can tell you is this, that I am not a methodical writer.

My horizon on humanity is enlarged by reading the writers of poems, seeing a painting, listening to some music, some opera, which has nothing at all to do with a volatile human condition or struggle or whatever. It enriches me as a human being.

I'm not one of those writers I learned about who get up in the morning, put a piece of paper in their typewriter machine and start writing. That I've never understood.

I think that feeling that if one believed absolutely in any cause, then one must have the confidence, the self-certainty, to go through with that particular course of action.

I grew up in an atmosphere where words were an integral part of culture.

I found, when I left, that there were others who felt the same way.

We'd meet, they'd come and seek me out, we'd talk about the future. And I found that their depression and pessimism was every bit as acute as mine.

I don't really consider myself a novelist, it just came out purely by accident.

I consider the process of gestation just as important as when you're actually sitting down putting words to the paper.

Even when I'm writing plays I enjoy having company and mentally I think of that company as the company I'm writing for.

But when you're deprived of it for a lengthy period then you value human companionship. But you have to survive and so you devise all kinds of mental exercises and it's amazing.

But theater, because of its nature, both text, images, multimedia effects, has a wider base of communication with an audience. That's why I call it the most social of the various art forms.

But the ultimate lesson is just sit down and write. That's all.

And I believe that the best learning process of any kind of craft is just to look at the work of others.

And gradually they're beginning to recognize the fact that there's nothing more secure than a democratic, accountable, and participatory form of government. But it's sunk in only theoretically, it has not yet sunk in completely in practical terms.

With each new book, the march of our national history takes a step forward.

When one is present at a book launch, one is bearing witness to the birth of a new body of ideas, to the coming into being of another testimony of history.

We have established a new basis in our country in which economic liberalization would continue to flourish alongside democratic forces and deregulated power structure.

To meet the expectations of the majority of our people, and to open up new vistas of economic opportunity so that the aspirations of Nigerians can stand a fair chance of being fulfilled in a lifetime, there must be a truly committed leadership in a democratic Nigeria.

There is also work to do in the evolution of a stable family life and values, and in ensuring that the Nigerian family is built on core values that will form the bedrock of the future society. We must showcase the ideals of family life and be models of family values.

There are no doubts that, the situation in the country today, indicates that there is much more work to do in the process of reforming the political economy and improving the quality of life of our people and communities.

The work of Nigeria is not complete for as long as there is any one Nigerian who goes to bed on empty stomach.

The return of democracy in our land has indeed thrown the problems of development into bolder relief.

The reason is that till date, in spite of advances in information technology and strategies of information, the written word in the form of books still remains one of humanity's most enduring legacies.

The history of our country is not the history of any other country in the world which is either practicing advanced democracy or struggling to lay the foundation for democracy.

The challenge as we saw in the Nigerian project was to restructure the economy decisively in the direction of a modern free market as an appropriate environment for cultivation of freedom and democracy and the natural emergence of a new social order.

The average Nigerian person has come to reconcile himself with the fact that his or her social progress remain essentially in his or her hands in collaboration with other fellow Nigerians and not merely relying on what government alone could provide for him or her.

Our choice of a reform framework dictated that we looked at the fundamental assumptions that had driven Nigeria's economy, society and policy hitherto and to seek ways of either abandoning or transcending those assumptions and their supporting institutions.