Most of us believe in trying to make other people happy only if they can be happy in ways which we approve.

The great person is ahead of their time, the smart make something out of it, and the blockhead, sets themselves against it.

An artist cannot fail; it is a success to be one.

One of the greatest joys known to man is to take a flight into ignorance in search of knowledge.

The literature of the inner life is very largely a record of struggle with the inordinate passions of the social self.

There is no aphrodisiac like innocence.

Cowardice and courage are never without a measure of affectation.

Nor is love. Feelings are never true. They play with their mirrors.

There is nothing less to our credit than our neglect of the foreigner and his children, unless it be the arrogance most of us betray when we set out to "Americanize" him.

Cut quarrels out of literature, and you will have very little history or drama or fiction or epic poetry left.

Nothing is unthinkable, nothing impossible to the balanced person, provided it comes out of the needs of life and is dedicated to life's further development.

The bashful are always aggressive at heart.

The imaginations which people have of one another are the solid facts of society.

Restore human legs as a means of travel.

Pedestrians rely on food for fuel and need no special parking facilities.

Knowledge is power only if man knows what facts not to bother with.

Almost any game with any ball is a good game.

There is no greater distance than that between a man in prayer and God.

Each man must have his I; it is more necessary to him than bread; and if he does not find scope for it within the existing institutions he will be likely to make trouble.

What is a society without a heroic dimension?

Genius is childhood recaptured.

However far modern science and techniques have fallen short of their inherent possibilities, they have taught mankind at least one lesson; nothing is impossible.

War is the supreme drama of a completely mechanized society.

Traditionalists are pessimists about the future and optimists about the past.

The cities and mansions that people dream of are those in which they finally live.

Families are nothing other than the idolatry of duty.

Driving is a spectacular form of amnesia.

Everything is to be discovered, everything to be obliterated.

Crime, family dissolution, welfare, and low levels of social organization are fundamentally a consequence of the disappearance of work.

The most successful ideological effects are those which have no need for words, and ask no more than complicitous silence.

The power of ads rests more in the repetition of obvious exhortations than in the subtle transmission of values.

There is nothing that makes us feel so good as the idea that someone else is an evil-doer.

Every man of genius is considerably helped by being dead.

There is hardly any one so insignificant that he does not seem imposing to some one at some time.

The dead govern the living.

However far modern science and techniques have fallen short of their inherent possibilities, they have taught mankind at least one lesson: Nothing is impossible.

A talent somewhat above mediocrity, shrewd and not too sensitive, is more likely to rise in the world than genius.

Our individual lives cannot, generally, be works of art unless the social order is also.

Every generation revolts against its fathers and makes friends with its grandfathers.

You are born modern, you do not become so.

The mind is not a hermit's cell, but a place of hospitality and intercourse.

It is always the same: once you are liberated, you are forced to ask who you are.

A negative judgment gives you more satisfaction than praise, provided it smacks of jealousy.

There is no way to penetrate the surface of life but by attacking it earnestly at a particular point.

We are born to action; and whatever is capable of suggesting and guiding action has power over us from the first.

Secrecy sets barriers between men, but at the same time offers the seductive temptation to break through the barriers by gossip or confession.

The moguls are driven by their respective desires for profit - period.

But presidential approval also became a surrogate measure of national unity and patriotism.

Partial truths or half-truths are often more insidious than total falsehoods.

Well, I think the United States first of all has to recognize the world for what it is.

The universe extends beyond the mind of man, and is more complex than the small sample one can study.

We assume, to begin with, that the individual is at least as complex in his internal structure as the language is which he speaks - otherwise, how could he speak a language which is complex?

Each person's life is lived as a series of conversations.