quote by Ida B. Wells

The Afro-American is not a bestial race. If this work can contribute in any way towards proving this, and at the same time arouse the conscience of the American people to a demand for justice to every citizen, and punishment by law for the lawless, I shall feel I have done my race a service. Other considerations are of minor importance.

— Ida B. Wells

Most Powerful Afro American quotations

Somebody must show that the Afro-American race is more sinned against than sinning, and it seems to have fallen upon me to do so.

Afro american quote Defiance, not obedience, is the American's answer to overbearing authority.
Defiance, not obedience, is the American's answer to overbearing authority.

The mob spirit has grown with the increasing intelligence of the Afro-American.

Afro american quote What if the American people woke up and understood that the official reasons for
What if the American people woke up and understood that the official reasons for going to war are almost always based on lies and promoted by war propaganda in order to serve special interests.

We are not only a Latin American nation, we are an Afro-American nation also.

The further jazz moves away from the stark blue continuum and the collective realities of Afro-American and American life, the more it moves into academic concert-hall lifelessness, which can be replicated by any middle class showing off its music lessons.

The further jazz moves away from the stark blue continuum and the collective realities of Afro-American and American life, the more it moves into academic concert-hall lifelessness, which can be replicated by any middle class showing off its music lessons.

Some years ago I said in an opinion that if this country is a melting pot, then either the Afro-Americans didn't get in the pot or he didn't get melted down.

The South resented giving the Afro-American his freedom, the ballot box and the Civil Rights Law.

The only times an Afro-American who was assaulted got away has been when he had a gun and used it in self-defense.

The Afro-American experience is the only real culture that America has.

Basically, every American tries to walk, talk, dress and behave like African Americans.

The Afro-American is not a bestial race.

Since the age of 12, all my musical thinking has been influenced by Afro-American music.

I might be a Cuban American, but I'm also an Afro-Cuban American.

Forget the methods or the differences in methods.

As long as we agree that the thing that the Afro-American wants and needs is recognition and respect as a human being.

When we say Afro American, we include everyone in the Western Hemisphere of African descent. South America is America. Central America is America. South America has many people in it of African descent.

The hearts of Afro-American women are too warm and too large for race hatred.

Long suffering has so chastened them that they are developing a special sense of sympathy for all who suffer and fail of justice.

A friend of mine who works for naval intelligence said an aerial satellite revealed that 1.9 million attended the event in 1995. But if they would have had a rumble at the march the newspapers would have said that 75 million Afro-Americans were there.

Since the main problem that American, the Afro- Americans have is a lack of cultural identity. It is necessary to teach [people] that they had some type of identity, culture, civilization before they were brought here.

For the Afro-American in the 1920's being a 'New Negro' was being 'Modern'.

And being an 'New Negro' meant, largely, not being an 'Old Negro', disassociating oneself from the symbols and legacy of slavery - being urbane, assertive militant.

The separating of a section of America for Afro- Americans is similar to expecting a heaven in the sky somewhere after you die.

Samba rhythm is a great one to sing on, but it's also got some other suggestions in it, an undercurrent of being primitive - because it is a primitive African, South American, Afro-whatever-you-call-that rhythm. So to white people, it has a very sinister thing about it.

Adam Clayton Powell's entire political career has to be looked at in the entire context of the American history and the history of, and the position of the Afro- American or negro in American history. [He] has done a remarkable job in fighting for rights of black people in this country. On the other hand, he probably hasn't done as much as he could or as much as he should because he is the most independent negro politician in this country.

When I say Afro-American aesthetic, I'm not just talking about the United States, I'm talking about the Americas. People in the Latin countries read my books because they share the same international aesthetic that I'm into and have been into for a long time. And it's multicultural.

The Afro-American is thus the backbone of the South.

I'm an African-American man with an Afro who isn't your typical athlete - who wasn't as masculine as other guys.

Jimi Hendrix came on TV on this documentary and it was this African-American soulful black guy, playing an electric guitar, which I'd just started. And it just blew my head off. I had like an afro at the time, too. It was a bit all over the place. And it wasn't a thing to have an afro. No, that's kind of quite old school. You're supposed to have like a neatly cut shaped up haircut.

In January of 1969, after a meeting to discuss the leadership of UCLA's new Afro-American Program, [Alprentice "Bunchy" Carter and John Huggins, Jr.] were murdered on campus by a rival black nationalist group, the United Slaves Organization. This shook up all the students, black and white, and made us all realize that what we were doing wasn't just an academic exercise, but had repercussions in the real world.

Does that mean that all vestiges of past discrimination would be eliminated, that the income gap or the wealth gap or the education gap [between Afro-Americans and white] would be erased in five years or 10 years? Probably not, and so this is obviously a discussion we've had before when you talk about something like reparations.

I might say this, that the problem of the, the solution for the Afro-American is two-fold - long-range and short-range.

The problem [ of the twenty-two million Afro-Americans] is so broad that it's going to take the inner working of all organizations.

I look at the problem of the twenty-two million Afro-Americans as being a problem that's so broad in scope that it's almost impossible for any organization to see it in its entirety.

The American system itself is incapable.

It is as incapable of producing freedom for the Afro-American as the system of a chicken is of producing a duck egg.

The 22 million or 30 million, whatever the case may be, Afro-Americans in the United States were still Africans.

There were tensions between these two organizations [Organization of Afro-American Unity and N.O.I.] , and Malcolm had to negotiate between them and since he was out of the country a great deal of the time, it was rather difficult for him to do so.

The Organization of Afro-American Unity was an organization that was a secular group. It largely consisted of people that we would later call several years later Black Powerites, Black nationalists, progressives coming out of the Black freedom struggle, the northern students' movement, people - students, young people, professionals, workers, who were dedicated to Black activism and militancy, but outside of the context of Islam.