quote by Isabel Paterson

As freak legislation, the antitrust laws stand alone. Nobody knows what it is they forbid.

— Isabel Paterson

Massive Antitrust quotations

The 10 largest antitrust law firms in the United States have gone into the federal courts charging Monsanto with creating a global conspiracy in violation of the antitrust laws, to control the global market in seeds.


The standard formulation on remedy is that it ought to cure past violations and prevent their recurrence. That's what antitrust is all about.

The testimony and the documentary evidence produced by the Government demonstrate that the Bell System had violated the antitrust laws in a number of ways over a lengthy period of time.

I have the most profound respect for the Department of Justice and the FTC.

We in Europe are a younger and I would say junior institution to the historical antitrust experience of the US.

The antitrust litigation currently in the federal courts in the U.

S. against Monsanto will be the test case in the life sciences, just as the Microsoft case was the test case in the information sciences.


Why should antitrust laws be used to block mergers that the market, by the existence of willing buyers and sellers, shows to be desirable?

This antitrust thing will blow over.

You can take this as a gentle word of warning, if you like.

We are just at the beginning of a period of more intensive antitrust enforcement.

Beware of that profound enemy of the free enterprise system who pays lip-service to free competition, but also labels every antitrust prosecution as a persecution.

Antitrust is the way that the government promotes markets when there are market failures. It has nothing to do with the idea of free information.


We can speculate on what's likely, but what's needed is an investigation.

And speculation is no substitute for facts. As a former prosecutor, I prosecuted antitrust cases civilly. And I can say that antitrust investigations merit searching, penetrating scrutiny and investigation. That's what we need here.

Vigilant and effective antitrust enforcement today is preferable to the heavy hand of government regulation of the Internet tomorrow.

My current goal is to change the way we think about antitrust and anti-monopoly.

Like IBM, the company [Microsoft] seems to have been spooked by the federal antitrust action against it and became increasingly sclerotic and less inventive.

Antitrust laws ought to be deployed, not against business, but to bust this two-party monopoly, which subverts competition in government and rewards the colluding quislings with sinecures in perpetuity.


We had planned to integrate a Web browser with our operating system as far back as 1993( filing its first court responses to federal antitrust)

Like other antitrust agencies we make our assessment of a merger or antitrust case based on its impact on our jurisdiction, and not on the nationality of the companies. This is exactly what the U.S. antitrust agencies, the Justice Department and the FTC, do.

The history of antitrust law enforcement shows that successful antitrust prosecutions have often strengthened and brought vitality to extremely large companies and businesses.

Maybe the discipline in North America is just consolidation, right? I mean, it may be that if there were more vigorous pursuit of antitrust in America, there would have more competitors competing on price, and then airlines wouldn't be making any money again.

It's time to use the antitrust laws and to break up this conglomerate corporate media that has now poisoned our democracy to the point that our very survival is at risk for the kinds of monstrosities that are flourishing in our corporate media dominated discussion.


We need to use antitrust laws. You know, we need to create real media again.

In reality, that was going to be very messy from an antitrust standpoint and meet a lot of resistance from the top management at Hasbro. That was a whole different story.

A significant piece of the wealth that the NFL owners garner is a result of the enormous TV revenues they get - and those revenues are supported by a legislatively granted exemption from the antitrust laws that has been made applicable to sports leagues, primarily the NFL.