quote by Sean Penn

Well, look at all of these summer blockbusters. You can't help but laugh a little, because you've already seen a lot of these movies 482 times.

— Sean Penn

Most Powerful Blockbusters quotations

I rarely see one of the 'summer blockbuster' movies.

I'd like to see a stronger focus on smaller, smarter movies.

I would rather do many small roles on TV, stage or film than one blockbuster that made me rich but had no acting.

I don't want to be Tom Cruise. I'm not after some movie blockbuster career. That's not the kind of work I'm interested in. And frankly, it's not the kind of work I'm ever going to get.

Maybe It's not the biggest blockbuster film, but there will be some people that will see it, that will be debating it, that will be questioning their own sense of spirituality. If the film resonates, then I have succeeded in what I set out to do.

There are so many things I'd like to change in the industry.

Everything from the reliance of style over substance to their reluctance to hire me for big budget blockbusters, but the thing I would love most would be if they understood people don't have to be Hollywood beautiful to be sexy or interesting.

There's a very specific thing you can do to get in magazines.

I'm much happier to just show up and do the job. I haven't taken the active approach to making myself a star. I haven't been in a blockbuster.

Everybody wants blockbusters. I like to see a few pictures now and then that have to do with people and have relationships, and that's what I want to do films about. I don't want to see these sci-fi movies, and I don't want to do one of those. I don't understand it.

Everyone wants to work in America. Maybe not blockbusters or Terminator, but to have the choice.

I like serious films, the moneymaking blockbusters that don't make any kind of sense and John Carpenter films.

I teach at USC. I have a big class of 360 kids, only about a fifth of whom are film majors. I don't just show the Hollywood blockbusters. I show independent films, foreign films, documentaries.

I founded Netflix. I've built it steadily over 12 years now, first with DVD becoming profitable in 2002, a head-to-head ferocious battle with Blockbuster and evolving the company toward streaming.

Comparing Apple to Netflix is like comparing apples to oranges, especially if the oranges made so many mistakes that people stopped eating oranges and just went back to Blockbuster.

The big-budget blockbuster is becoming one of the most dependable forms of filmmaking.

I used to work at this store called Music Plus in San Clemente, California, when I was growing up, and then they became Blockbuster Music, and, like, you had to get a haircut to work there, and at the time I had some pretty long hair. So after that policy was imposed, I knew that was going to be my last summer working there.

I have a great career, and no matter what I am doing, a big blockbuster movie.

.. or my small documentary, David Letterman will call and say I would like you to sit on my couch.

I'll never get a part in a huge action blockbuster.

Of course, I'd like to produce and direct a blockbuster, but you gotta build up to that. So now I'm learning from a bunch of little movies. And it's more fun with smaller pictures. It's more creative.

I've never achieved spectacular success with a film.

My reputation has grown slowly. I suppose you could say that I'm a successful filmmaker-in that a number of people speak well of me. But none of my films have received unanimously positive reviews, and none have done blockbuster business.

I don’t really like the Hollywood blockbuster bandwagon that exists right now.

The industry and the advent of all the technology, has kind of lost its way. It’s become very franchise driven and superhero driven.

A friend of mine who used to be my boss at ESPN once was asked why sports had exploded the way it had. He said, "Because you can't go to Blockbuster and rent tonight's game." Every night is different in sports. Every day there are different heroes and villains and conversations after the game.

Without doing the big blockbusters, I wouldn't be able to find the money to go after little projects that I want to do.

I got completely fed up with that Hollywood blockbuster mentality.

I couldn't take it seriously any longer.

It seems like the studios are either making giant blockbusters, or really super-small indies. And the mid-level films I grew up on, like 'Back to the Future' and all those John Hughes movies, the studios aren't doing. It's hard to get them on their feet.

The problem is this: in order to make money- lots of money- we don't need flawless literary masterpieces. What we need is mediocre rubbish, trash suitable for mass consumption. More and more, bigger and bigger blockbusters of less and less significance. What counts is the paper we sell, not the words that are printed on it.

What I love about the 'Alien' franchise is I would do all kinds of films - dramas, comedies, whatever - and every now and then I'd be in this science fiction blockbuster that would re-introduce the character and me to a lot of audiences around the world and allow me to go back and do the smaller films again, so it was really a good balance for me.

I'm not really a blockbuster, I'm not a member of that audience really.

Blockbusting fiction is bought as furniture.

Unread, it maintains its value. Read, it looks like money wasted. Cunningly, Americans know that books contain a person, and they want the person, not the book.

For years, Blockbuster Video has edited movies.

Like The Bad Lieutenant, when he's masturbating while the girls in the car are doing the thing. I rented it from Blockbuster and sped to that scene, and it was gone. I called up Blockbuster, and I'm like, "I got an erection, and the scene's not there."

Vaccines are not traditionally big money makers.

They're given once or a few times in one's life, so they're never going to be blockbusters.

From 1971 onwards, the Memorial Day holiday was officially observed on the last Monday in May and became the unofficial start of the summer, with barbecues, blockbuster movie openings and mattress sales.

Often when you get a really good script, and you receive the new pages, you see that the entire thing has been dumbed down. Films in the '30s and '40s, that were huge blockbusters, were very sophisticated in their language, and the ideas they brought. There were no questions about whether the audience would get it or not.

For a creative person there's just as much pleasure in writing an eight-line poem as there is in writing a blockbuster play ... of the old '50s type.

In an ideal world, I'd bounce between big projects and no-budget TV dramas with fantastic scripts. A lot of Hollywood films tend to be bloated, bombastic, loud. At the same time, I do like the infrastructure of making a blockbuster; it's like having a big train set.

Not to bash Los Angeles, but there is always a feeling in LA of where your stock is. Are you the top of the heap at the moment or do you have the blockbuster, did you get cast in that thing?

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