quote by Natalie Portman

I loved school so much that most of my classmates considered me a dork.

— Natalie Portman

Almighty Classmates quotations

My classmates would copulate with anything that moved, but I never saw any reason to limit myself.

In fact, if they didn't let me commute, I would not have taken the role because I wanted to graduate high school with my classmates. I remember my agent's jaw dropping when I told him if I couldn't commute I didn't want the role.

My experiences at Princeton have made me far more aware of my 'blackness' than ever before. I have found that at Princeton, no matter how liberal and open-minded some of my white professors and classmates try to be toward me, I sometimes feel like a visitor on campus; as if I really don't belong.

Ever since we had arrived in the United States, my classmates kept asking me about magic carpets. - They don't exist-I always said. I was wrong. Magic carpets do exist. But they are called library cards.

I am still a student. My classmates study really hard, so I feel like I should too. But they always say things like: “You don't have to.”, “Aren't you busy?”, “Just give up, you have another way.”; But I don't think that's right. There's no reason for me to give up, I didn't quit high school.

A child's learning is a function more of the characteristics of his classmates than those of the teacher.

People worry more about girls, for a good reason: I don't think my parents thought I was going to be raped by a classmate or attacked when I was walking alone in some neighborhood. So it's not just paranoid parents.

At school I pretended I had a normal life, but I felt lonely all the time and different from everyone else. I never felt like I fit in, and I wasn't allowed to participate in after-school activities, go to sports events or parties or date boys. Many times I had to make up stories about why I couldn't do anything with my classmates.

I was somewhat out of place among my classmates; I could not be as bohemian as they were.

I never imagined getting to do what I love for a living and having so many people appreciate it. There was only one other skater in my high school and we were the lowest form of cool. Our classmates couldn't figure out why we liked such a loser sport, or why we hadn't grown out of it yet.

Yeah, I’m thinking it’s a reunion or, since it is our classmates, a collection of idiots. Let’s call it a meese. Like geese, only with morons. (Caleb)

I am an only child and home-schooled, so I have no siblings or classmates.

I honestly felt no envy or resentment, only astonishment at how much of a world there was out there and how much of it others already knew. The agenda for self-cultivation that had been set for my classmates by their teachers and parents was something I'd have to develop for myself.

No, no, I was only funny on stage, really.

I, I, think I was funny as a person toward my classmates when I was very young. You know, when I was a child, up to about the age of 12.

I really was more sexual than my classmates.

When I first went to jail in 1960 with seven classmates trying to use their public library against the backdrop of my father being a veteran of World War II, not being able to use - having to sit behind Nazi on American military bases, I lost my fear of jails and death.

My egotistical concern was less that I would fail to relate to my classmates than that they would know nothing of my uniquely tortured life's course and, thus, me.

I occasionally go to a yoga class. Everyone looks so limber and coordinated compared to me. I feel like I scare my classmates.

I want my daughter to be able to go to school and see the diversity of things that her classmates are eating and appreciate that, too. So I'm really excited for her to just kind of sit in and watch me cook and be really hands on and just enjoy cooking.

You named them: hustlers, killers, fiends, ex-cons.

I called them: cousins, aunts, pops, moms. To you? Hoodlums, crackheads, gunmens. To me? Just neighbors, classmates, young friends.

I was born in segregated Birmingham, Alabama.

I didn't have a white classmate till we moved to Denver.

I was never top of the class at school, but my classmates must have seen potential in me, because my nickname was Einstein.

We are no longer worried that children are missing school because of video games, though. We are worried that they are murdering their classmates because of video games.

It took me until my teenage years to realize that I was medicating with music.

I was pushing back against my stupid school uniform, instructors who called me by my last name and my classmates, who, while friendly enough, were not at all inspiring.

I had literary interests my whole life.

I decided at the age of five I was going to be a writer. So I had done a great deal of reading. I suppose I was more at home in Greenwich Village than, say, any of classmates from Warsaw High School. But in any case, it was an overwhelming experience for me. It took me some time to begin to assimilate it.

The first several years of my life were used to upload incredible amounts of fear, and I just became afraid of everything. I was afraid of my parents, afraid of my classmates, afraid of the streets of Washington, D.C. I would flinch at every gesture.

When everyone at school is speaking one language, and a lot of your classmates' parents also speak it, and you go home and see that your community is different -there is a sense of shame attached to that. It really takes growing up to treasure the specialness of being different.

I had a classmate who fitted for college by the lamps of a lighthouse, which was more light, we think, than the University afforded.

While my classmates were reading their textbooks, I drew in the margins.

On the steps of the Federal Building we ran into Carmencita Ibanez, a classmate of ours and one of the nice things about being a member of a race with two sexes.

Most Bolton students were scions of the city's wealthiest families.

My crewe stuck out like hooker at church. We werent part of their pampered, priveliged world, and many of our classmates were quick to remind us of that fact. Taunting the "boat kids" was practically a varsity sport.

I was very strict on that point. No devouring classmates." Jeremy rolled his eyes. "Other parents warn their kids not to talk to strangers. I had to warn mine not to eat them.

What I would do is I would just remember the scene and I'd go home and I'd write out the scene from memory. And anything I didn't remember I would just fill in the blanks myself and then go and give it to a classmate and then we'd do it.

Jenna Bush was cited for underage drinking in Austin Friday.

Her dad warned her that too much partying at school could cost her a good career. At $400,000, he's making the lowest salary of any of his Yale classmates.

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