quote by Casey Stengel

I never saw anyone like Ty Cobb. No one even close to him as the greatest all-time ballplayer. That guy was superhuman, amazing.

— Casey Stengel

Astounding Cobb quotations

I'm not very funny in real life. I used to want to be a comedian when I was 13, 14, 15, till I saw "Death Of A Salesman" with Lee J. Cobb and Mildred Dunnock.


I am seeing all the guys, like Earnie Shavers, Tex Cobb, and Larry Holmes all the time.

In Georgia it's a little different because of the East Cobb program.

It's such a strong program that we see a lot of kids that come through here on a lot of different teams from across the country that come here to play in tournaments.

Gary Cobb Quotes

It is hard to compare the eras, but Joe Jackson and Ty Cobb from the past, Sandy Koufax and Roger Clements from the present.

I would much rather read a book about Ty Cobb, who was quite possibly a sociopath. It makes for more interesting copy. Some of the most memorable characters in literature were villains.


Was Ty Cobb psychotic throughout his baseball career? The answer is yes.

John Cobb is saying that perhaps we are beginning to see that now as our greed goes completely out of control and everything is seen through money, through corporate power, etc., etc. We know it well. He asked the question, What will be the holocaust that takes us to the next era? - which he describes as "Earthism."

Cobb would have to play center field on my all time team.

But where would that put Speaker? In left. If I had them both, I would certainly play them that way.

The Babe was a great ballplayer, sure, but Cobb was even greater.

Babe could knock your brains out, but Cobb would drive you crazy.

Cobb is a prick. But he sure can hit. God Almighty, that man can hit.


When I get the record, all it will make me is the player with the most hits.

I'm also the player with the most at bats and the most outs. I never said I was a greater player than Cobb.

Cobb lived off the field as though he wished to live forever.

He lived on the field as though it was his last day.

Jerrie Cobb reached down and pulled the heavy layers of arctic clothing over her navy blue linen dress.

It hurt me a great deal. It put a lot of pressure on me because I was at a young age and the writers around here and throughout the league starting comparing me to Cobb. It put a lot of pressure on me.

Tex Cobb would call me every day after we fought, I got sick of talking to him.

I liked him a lot as a fighter, and as a person, and feel that sometimes he was misunderstood.


I have heard of managers who encourage players not to slide hard for fear they will get hurt and be lost from the lineup for a time. That is why you occasionally see a player go into second base on a double-play ball and not even bother to slide. I wonder, could Ty Cobb sit though plays like that and hold his lunch?

(Rogers) Hornsby could run like anything but not like this kid.

(Ty) Cobb was the fastest I ever saw for being sensational on the bases.

From my table inside I watch the glamorous women outside who are lunching on Spa Cobb salads without blue cheese or dressing. The man with the bread basket wanders from table to table, lonesome as a cloud. When he comes to me his basket is full and perfectly arranged. He gives me a smile of sincere pleasure when I tell him I will take both the sourdough roll and the cheese stick.

I broke in with four hits and the writers promptly declared they had seen the new Ty Cobb. It took me only a few days to correct that impression.

In Georgia it's a little different because of the East Cobb program.

It's such a strong program that we see a lot of kids that come through here on a lot of different teams from across the country that come here to play in tournaments.


He was the strangest of all our national sports idols.

But not even his disagreeable character could destroy the image of his greatness as a ballplayer. Ty Cobb was the best. That seemed to be all he wanted.

The greatness of Ty Cobb was something that had to be seen, and to see him was to remember him forever.

Few names have left a firmer imprint upon the pages of the history of American times than has that of Ty Cobb... he seems to have understood that in the competition of baseball, just as in war, defensive strategy never has produced ultimate victory.

Ty Cobb was still fighting the Civil War, and as far as he was concerned, we were all damn Yankees. But who knows, if he hadn't had that terrible persecution complex, he never would have been about the best ballplayer who ever lived.