quote by Peggy Guggenheim

To go out in a gondola at night is to reconstruct in one's imagination the true Venice, the Venice of the past alive with romance, elopements, abductions, revenged passions, intrigues, adulteries, denouncements, unaccountable deaths, gambling, lute playing and singing.

— Peggy Guggenheim

Jaw-dropping Death In Venice quotations

Death in venice quote I hope to arrive to my death, late, in love and a little drunk.

I hope to arrive to my death, late, in love and a little drunk.

Solitude produces originality, bold and astonishing beauty, poetry.

But solitude also produces perverseness, the disproportianate, the absurd and the forbidden.

I stood in Venice, on the Bridge of Sighs, A palace and a prison on each hand.

Death in venice quote If nothing saves us from death, may love at least save us from life.

If nothing saves us from death, may love at least save us from life.

The weakest kind of fruit drops earliest to the ground.

To my mind, Death in Venice represents an enormous advance in Mann's literary development, not simply for the commonly appreciated reason that he crafted a superbly supple and elegant style, apparently well suited to the kind of prose Aschenbach is supposed to write.

Mann's Death in Venice actually contains a snippet of philosophy about the second question, when Aschenbach, collapsed in the plaza, engages in his quasi-Socratic, anti-Socratic, ruminations.

Death in venice quote Each time you read a book, a tree smiles knowing there's life after death.

Each time you read a book, a tree smiles knowing there's life after death.

Part of my methodological approach is made explicit when I discuss ways in which literature can have philosophical significance. Literature doesn't typically argue - and when it does, it's deadly dull. But literature can supply the frame within which we come to observe and reason, or it can change our frame in highly significant ways. That's one of the achievements I'd claim for Mann, and for Death in Venice.

First, my frame of reference for the Britten opera shifted.

I'd always thought of Britten's approach in Death in Venice as another exploration of the plight of the individual whose aspirations are at odds with those of the surrounding community: his last opera returning to the themes of Peter Grimes. As I read and listened and thought, however, Billy Budd came to seem a more appropriate foil for Death in Venice.

As I read Mann in German for the first time, the full achievement - both literary and philosophical - of Death in Venice struck me forcefully, so that, when I was invited to give the Schoff Lectures at Columbia, the opportunity to reflect on the contrasts between novella and opera seemed irresistible.

Death in venice quote I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say i

I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

Quentin [Tarantino] called me and said: "Yeah, you've got to be in my movie.

You've got to be in Death Proof." But he made me audition. I was like: "Dude, I don't even want to do this..." So I left the casting of Hostel: Part II to drive to Venice, where Quentin was holding his casting, and the person ahead of me was Derek Richardson from Hostel 1 and he was like: "Dude, what are you doing here?" I said: "Don't ask!"

Venice is ever the fragile labyrinth at the edge of the sea and it reminds us how brief and perilous the journeys of our lives are; perhaps that is why we love it so. City of plagues and brief liaisons, city of lingering deaths and incendiary loves, city of chimeras, nightmares, pigeons, bells. You are the only city in the world whose dialect has a word for the shimmer of canal water reflected on the ceiling of a room.

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