quote by George Washington

Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence . . . the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake.

— George Washington

Unbelievable Farewell Address quotations

Farewell address quote When you can't solve and address and issue or opportunity, there is no harm or s

When you can't solve and address and issue or opportunity, there is no harm or shame in reaching out for people who can.

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History and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government.

We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.

Observe good faith and justice towards all Nations.

Cultivate peace and harmony with all. Religion and morality enjoin this conduct; and can it be that good policy does not equally enjoin it?

Honesty is always the best policy.

The nation which indulges towards another an habitual hatred, or an habitual fondness, is in some degree a slave. It is a slave to its animosity or to its affection, either of which is sufficient to lead it astray from its duty and its interest.

Washington's address is virtually unknown today and has not been seen in most American history textbooks in nearly four decades. Perhaps it is because of all the religious warnings Washington made in his 'Farewell Address.'

The Constitution which at any time exists, 'till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole People is sacredly obligatory upon all.

Let me ... warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party.

Citizens by birth or choice of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of American, which belongs to you, in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of Patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations.

One of the expedients of party to acquire influence, within particular districts, is to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts.

Every day the increasing weight of years admonishes me more and more, that the shade of retirement is as necessary to me as it will be welcome.

Can it be that Providence has not connected the permanent felicity of a nation with its virtue?

Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm the attachment.

The common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it.

I hold the maxim no less applicable to public than to private affairs, that honesty is always the best policy.

As a very important source of strength and security, cherish public credit.

The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.

[The spirit of party] serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another.

Interwoven is the love of liberty with every ligament of the heart.

Harmony, liberal intercourse with all nations, are recommended by policy, humanity, and interest.

Why quit our own to stand upon foreign ground? Why, by interweaving our destiny with that of any part of Europe, entangle our peace and prosperity in the toils of European Ambition, Rivalship, Interest, Humour or Caprice?

The name of American, which belongs to you, in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of Patriotism . . .

We ... must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering for our own ease and convenience the precious resources of tomorrow.

The duty of holding a Neutral conduct may be inferred, without any thing more, from the obligation which justice and humanity impose on every nation, in cases in which it is free to act, to maintain inviolate the relations of Peace and amity toward other Nations.

But in his Farewell Address, George Washington made it clear that he perceived no greater threat to the American experiment than a partisan demagogue who 'agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against the other'

Nothing is more essential, than that permanent, inveterate antipathies against particular Nations, and passionate attachments for others, should be excluded; and that, in place of them, just and amicable feelings towards all should be cultivated.

I have the consolation to believe, that, while choice and prudence invite me to quit the political scene, patriotism does not forbid it.

I have already intimated to you the danger of parties in the state, with particular reference to the founding of them on geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party, generally.

Our arms must be mighty ... ready for instant action, so that no potential aggressor may be tempted to risk his own destruction

Avoiding occasions of expense by cultivating peace, we should remember also that timely disbursements to prepare for danger frequently prevent much greater disbursements to repel it

The Independence and Liberty you possess are the work of joint councils and joint efforts, of common dangers, sufferings and successes.

Can it be, that Providence has not connected the permanent felicity of a Nation with its virtue? The experiment, at least, is recommended by every sentiment which ennobles human Nature. Alas! is it rendered impossible by its vices?

The Founders didn't mention political parties when they wrote the Constitution, and George Washington in essence warned us against them in his Farewell Address.

It is interesting to note that during the last ten years Washington's 'Farewell Address' has begun to reappear in college textbooks - minus the four religious warnings.

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