quote by David Cameron

Conservatives believe in the ties that bind us. Society is stronger when we make vows to each other and we support each other. I don't support gay marriage in spite of being a conservative. I support gay marriage because I am a conservative.

— David Cameron

Empowering Marriage Vows quotations

Nature admits of no permanence in the relation between man and woman.

It is only man's egoism that wants to keep woman like some buried treasure. All endeavors to introduce permanence in love, the most changeable thing in this changeable human existence, have gone shipwreck in spite of religious ceremonies, vows, and legalities.


Marriage vows quote Ultimately, the bond of all companionship, whether in marriage or friendship, is
Ultimately, the bond of all companionship, whether in marriage or friendship, is conversation.

The secret to having a good marriage is to understand that marriage must be total, it must be permanent, and it must be equal.

Marriage vows quote We simply can't abandon ship every time we encounter a storm in our marriage. Re
We simply can't abandon ship every time we encounter a storm in our marriage. Real love is about weathering the storms of life together.
19

Marriage is two imperfect people committing themselves to a perfect institution, by making perfect vows from imperfect lips before a perfect God.

I love thee, I love but thee, With a love that shall not die.

If I get married again, I want a guy there with a drum to do rimshots during the vows.


Political promises are much like marriage vows.

They are made at the beginning of the relationship between candidate and voter, but are quickly forgotten.

a good marriage is that in which each appoints the other guardian of his solitude

If ever two were one, then surely we. If ever man were loved by wife, then thee.

The free exchange of consent properly witnessed by the Church establishes the marriage bond. Sexual union consummates it - seals it, completes it, perfects it. Sexual union, then, is where the words of the wedding vows become flesh.

And if God choose I shall but love thee better after death.


I am a good friend to my husband. I have tried to make my marriage vows mean what they say. I show up. I listen. I try to laugh.

They slipped briskly into an intimacy from which they never recovered.

It is with great sadness and a heavy heart that I have decided to end my six-year marriage to Ashton. As a woman, a mother and a wife there are certain values and vows that I hold sacred, and it is in this spirit that I have chosen to move forward with my life.

The WWII generation shares so many common values: duty, honor, country, personal responsibility and the marriage vow " For better or for worse--it was the last generation in which, broadly speaking, marriage was a commitment and divorce was not an option

Those who talk most about the blessings of marriage and the constancy of its vows are the very people who declare that if the chain were broken and the prisoners left free to choose, the whole social fabric would fly asunder. You cannot have the argument both ways. If the prisoner is happy, why lock him in? If he is not, why pretend that he is?


A married person does not live in isolation.

He or she has made a promise, a pledge, a vow, to another person. Until that vow is fulfilled and the promise is kept, the individual is in debt to his marriage partner. That is what he owes. 'You owe it to yourself' is not a valid excuse for breaking a marriage vow but a creed of selfishness.

I love thee freely, as men strive for right.

I love thee purely, as they turn from praise. I love thee with the passion put to use

May these vows and this marriage be blessed.

Divorce these days is a religious vow, as if the proper offspring of marriage.

The marriage vow is an absurdity imposed by society.


Such an act That blurs the grace and blush of modesty;

Calls virtue hypocrite; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers' oaths.

Now you will feel no rain, for each of you will be shelter for the other.

Now you will feel no cold, for each of you will be warmth for the other. Now there will be no loneliness, for each of you will be companion to the other. Now you are two persons, but there are three lives before you: His life, Her Life, and Your life together.

To make a vow for life is to make oneself a slave.

In marriage for example, you say 'Yes' on the day you get married, 'I do', but each day you implicitly if not explicitly, also say 'Yes', by every act that one performs in a marriage, one is saying 'Yes', making a cup of coffee for one's wife or husband is a form of saying 'Yes' to the marriage vow that one is continuing the marriage by affirming it in one's deeds. And exactly the same in the religious life.

I think that marriage vows should include an escape clause that says the contract is broken if one party ups and makes a big switch in religion or politics or aesthetic taste. I mean, these shifts just aren't fair, and we need an easier way out.


Ours was the Togetherness Generation.

We equated togetherness with salvation, and expected so much from it that it was bound to let us down. Companionship, security, lifelong physical and spiritual and emotional warmth - all were to be had for the twist of a ring and the breathing of a vow. And to be had no other way.

If you exchanged wedding vows, tape them to your bathroom mirror and read them aloud to yourself every morning along with the ritual brushing of teeth. It's not realistic to believe that you will live your promises as a daily practice -- unless you're a saint or a highly evolved Zen Buddhist. Not where marriage is concerned. But you can make a practice of returning to your vows when the going gets rough.

As I grew up and began identifying myself as a feminist, there were plenty of issues that continued to make me question marriage: the father "giving" the bride away, women taking their husband's last name, the white dress, the vows promising to "obey" the groom. And that only covers the wedding.

As compromised as their marriage might be, part of her still believed in her vows. She loved the man he'd been, and she loved the man she knew he could be.

Marriage is a call to die [to self]... Christian marriage vows are the inception of a lifelong practice of death, of giving over not only all you have, but all you are. Is this a grim gallows call? Not at all! It is no more grim than dying to self and following Christ. In fact, those who lovingly die for their [spouses] are those who know the most joy, have the most fulfilling marriages, and experience the most love.


Some vows, or contracts, are for life; others are for limited periods of time.

Fidelity to one's marriage vows is absolutely essential for love, trust and peace

In many instances, marriage vows would be more accurate if the phrase were changed to 'Until debt do us part'.

How is it you’ve never married?” A soft splash.

“It’s an easy enough thing. Every morning I wake up, go about my day, and return to bed at night without having recited marriage vows. After several years, I have the trick of it down.