quote by Mark Antony

Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears.

— Mark Antony

Useful Modern English quotations

I studied English literature in the honors program, which means that you had to take courses in various centuries. You had to start with Old English, Middle English, and work your way toward the modern. I figured if I did that it would force me to read some of the things I might not read on my own.

Modern english quote Never make fun of someone who speaks broken English. It means they know another
Never make fun of someone who speaks broken English. It means they know another language.
Meaningful Modern english quotes
Visualise all those meaningful modern english quotes

I notice that you use plain, simple language, short words and brief sentences.

That is the way to write English - it is the modern way and the best way. Stick to it; don't let fluff and flowers and verbosity creep in.

Modern english quote It seems to me that once if your life before you die you ought to see a country
It seems to me that once if your life before you die you ought to see a country where they don't talk in English and don't even want to.

Although the Irish language is connected with the many recollections that twine around the hearts of Irishmen, yet the superior utility of the English tongue, as the medium of all modern communication, is so great that I can witness without a sigh the gradual decline of the Irish language.

Mind you, the Elizabethans had so many words for the female genitals that it is quite hard to speak a sentence of modern English without inadvertently mentioning at least three of them.


You might sooner get lightning out of incense smoke than true action or passion out of your modern English religion.

Modern english quote Black-and-white always looks modern, whatever that word means.
Black-and-white always looks modern, whatever that word means.

Mind you, the Elizabethans had so many words for the female genitals that it is quite hard to speak a sentence of modern English without inadvertently mentioning at least three of them.

Modern poetry, for me, began not in English at all but in Spanish, in the poems of Lorca.

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war!


The characteristic merit of the English constitutions is, that its dignified parts are very complicated and somewhat imposing, very old and rather venerable, while its efficient part, at least when in great and critical action, is decidedly simple and modern.

Think about Elizabethan English, where the entire English language behaved pretty much like molten lava, like a volcano in mid-eruption. Modern Hebrew has some things in common with Elizabethan English. It is being reshaped and it's expanding very rapidly in various directions.

Default is not in our stars, but in ourselves.

The great misfortune of the modern English is not at all that they are more boastful than other people (they are not); it is that they are boastful about those particular things which nobody can boast of without losing them.

In addition to English, at least one ancient language, probably Greek or Hebrew, and two modern languages would be required.


If you go through any newspaper or magazine and look for active, kicking verbs in the sentences, you will realize that this lack of well used verbs is the main trouble with modern English writing. Almost all nonfiction nowadays is written in a sort of pale, colorless sauce of passives and infinitives, motionless and flat as paper.

I had art as a major, along with English, French and History.

I had dance, modern dance. In English I was allowed to write my own poetry, which I eventually got published.

Even modern English people are imperious, superior, ridden by class.

All of the hypocrisy and the difficulties that are endemic in being British also make it an incredibly fertile place culturally. A brilliant place to live. Sad but true.

The great watershed of modern poetry is French, more than English.

Modern English, especially written English, is full of bad habits which spread by imitation and which can be avoided if one is willing to take the necessary trouble.


Men must speak English who can write Sanskrit;

they must speak a modern language who write, perchance, an ancient and universal one.

At the age of 12 I won the school prize for Best English Essay.

The prize was a copy of Somerset Maugham's 'Introduction To Modern English And American Literature.' To this day I keep it on the shelf between my collection of Forester's works and the little urn that contains my mother's ashes.

I'm English enough to feel something of a gut-reaction to modernism, to continental philosophising and anything that smacks of a refusal to pay attention to the forensics: the empirical facts on the ground.

Is it surprising that modern English land law should resemble a chaos rather than a system?

I would say that the writers I like and trust have at the base of their prose something called the English sentence. An awful lot of modern writing seems to me to be a depressed use of language. Once, I called it "vow-of-poverty prose." No, give me the king in his countinghouse. Give me Updike.


He was the product of an English public school and university.

He was, moreover, a modern product of those seats of athletic exercise. He had little education and highly developed muscles -- that is to say, he was no scholar, but essentially a gentleman.

The great British Library -- one of these sequestered pools of obsolete literature to which modern authors repair, and draw buckets full of classic lore, or pure English, undefiled wherewith to swell their own scanty rills of thought.

The young specialist in English Lit, .

.. lectured me severely on the fact that in every century people have thought they understood the Universe at last, and in every century they were proved to be wrong. It follows that the one thing we can say about our modern 'knowledge' is that it is wrong. ... My answer to him was, ... when people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together.

All of which suggested literary translation, and Korean seemed a good bet - barely anything available in English, yet it was a modern, developed country, so the work had to be out there, plus the rarity would make it both easier to secure a student grant and more of a niche when it came to work.

The young specialist in English Lit, .

..lectured me severely on the fact that in every century people have thought they understood the Universe at last, and in every century they were proved to be wrong. It follows that the one thing we can say about our modern "knowledge" is that it is wrong.


Modern English, especially written English, is full of bad habits which spread by imitation and which can be avoided if one is willing to take the necessary trouble. If one gets rid of these habits one can think more clearly, and to think clearly is a necessary first step toward political regeneration: so that the fight against bad English is not frivolous and is not the exclusive concern of professional [or scholarly] writers.

I think Lucy Ferry, now Birley, is absolutely beautiful.

She's a modern girl, but she moves beautifully. Amanda [Harlech] moves beautifully when she's not working. All those English leftover society girls.

The modern haematologist, instead of describing in English what he can see, prefers to describe in Greek what he can’t.

The oligarchic character of the modern English commonwealth does not rest, like many oligarchies, on the cruelty of the rich to the poor. It does not even rest on the kindness of the rich to the poor. It rests on the perennial and unfailing kindness of the poor to the rich.

It was not long before English Law took the one step needed to produce the modern scheme of legal remedies. And when it did, it used the Writ of Trespass as the starting point.