quote by Al Capone

Every time a boy falls off a tricycle, every time a black cat has gray kittens, every time someone stubs a toe, every time there's a murder or a fire or the marines land in Nicaragua, the police and the newspapers holler 'get Capone.'

— Al Capone

Tremendous Nicaragua quotations

I made a gym, it's the best gym in Nicaragua, I have kids that this year July 6th through the 11th will be fighting and then will go on to the Central American Games and I'm sure at least one will win a gold medal.


In Nicaragua, liberty, equality and the rule of law were the stuff of dreams.

But in Paris I discovered the value of those words.

Meaningful Nicaragua quotes
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The British Red Cross asked me to help them spearhead a fundraising campaign for the victims of the war in Nicaragua. It was a turning point in my life. It began my commitment to justice and human rights issues.

Violence has been Nicaragua's most important export to the world.

The U.S. embargo imposed on Nicaragua, rather than weakening the Sandinistas, actually maintained them in power.


And Walker was made with a Mexican crew, although it was shot in Nicaragua.

My mother would take groups of students to different countries and always brought us along, so by the time I was 10, I had been to Russia, China, Nicaragua and several other countries.

I often traveled to Nicaragua to speak against repressive policies by the Sandinista government.

There was the situation in Nicaragua where the Sandinistas had taken over a couple of years earlier. There was a civil war going on in El Salvador and there was a similar situation in Guatemala. So Honduras was in a rather precarious geographic position indeed.

I am still profoundly troubled by the war in Nicaragua.

The United States launched a covert war against another nation in violation of international law, a war that was wrong and immoral.


There isn't any way for the people of Nicaragua to find out what's going on in Nicaragua.

Nicaragua is fast becoming a terrorist country club.

I think the difference between El Salvador and Nicaragua is that in Nicaragua you had a popular insurrection, and in El Salvador you had a revolution.

There is a question for which we will never know the answer: had the U.

S. not launched the Contra war to overthrow the Sandinista government, would they have succeeded in bringing socioeconomic justice to the people of Nicaragua?

My son lives in Nicaragua. My daughters live in the United States.


The Christians seized all the maize the locals of Nicaragua had grown for themselves and their own families and, as a consequence, some twenty or thirty thousand natives died of hunger, some mothers even killing their own children and eating them.

Freedom-loving people around the world must say .

. . I am a refugee in a crowded boat foundering off the coast of Vietnam. I am Laotian, a Cambodian, a Cuban, and a Miskito Indian in Nicaragua. I, too, am a potential victim of totalitarianism.

In my opinion, peace has not come to America, to Nicaragua, or to El Salvador.

A hungry people is a people without peace. If the demands of the people are not met, what kind of peace are we talking about?

The revolution in Nicaragua was the first of its kind to be accomplished with the mass support of Christians, a fact that cannot fail to influence the further development of revolutionary movements in the whole of Latin America, whose inhabitants are predominantly Christian.

Nicaragua is becoming the least expensive Caribbean destination.


If something is right (or wrong) for us, it’s right (or wrong) for others.

It follows that if it’s wrong for Cuba, Nicaragua, Haiti, and a long list of others to bomb Washington and New York, then it’s wrong for Rumsfeld to bomb Afghanistan (on much flimsier pretexts), and he should be brought before war crimes trials.

Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Nicaragua have shown that by breaking with the unfair order imposed by the neoliberal adjustment policies, promoted by Washington and the western powers, they already have a more favorable economic development, and even a better social development.

Going to places like Honduras, Nicaragua, and various African countries you get to see very clearly what the cause and effect is. We finance the obnoxious elites in those countries and they exploit their people so we don't have to say that we're doing the exploiting but nevertheless we are benefiting from it.

Both my best and worst memories are of my time in Nicaragua.

The experience as a whole was totally redeeming and amazing. It sounds so cliche, but I don't care because I'm saying that from the heart. I stayed with a host family and went back to the same kind of rural farming village outside of Managua.

If Instagram had been available when I was working in Nicaragua in 1978, I'm sure I would have wanted to use it as a way of reporting directly from the streets during the insurrection.


Nicaragua dealt with the problem of terrorism in exactly the right way.

It followed international law and treaty obligations. It collected evidence, brought the evidence to the highest existing tribunal, the International Court of Justice, and received a verdict - which, of course, the U.S. dismissed with contempt.

No one is concerned with Central America anymore.

If a million people are facing starvation in northern Nicaragua and Honduras, it's none of our business. Few people even recognize that this situation is in part an outgrowth of US policies going back to the 1980's. Nobody is concerned because Nicaragua is technically stable.

It is pretty amazing. My parents, who came from Nicaragua to the U.S. - who would have thought that they would have American kids on the Olympic team? I think that's the epitome of the Olympic dream.

When I was 15 and then 16 years old, I spent two summers in Nicaragua for a service project. I took Spanish classes the first week and got acclimated to Central America. I loved it.

The idea of accountability in Vietnam, Nicaragua and now Iraq - the media never has that in its quiver. When you see time after time there is no possibility of Nuremberg [war crime trials], we're doomed to have it repeated.


Nicaragua is a World Bank and International Monetary Fund designated "heavily indebted poor country," with little legal ability to control its economic future: Everything is for sale. And once Nicaraguans decide to cash in and sell their houses or farms, they have to look far inland for anything affordable.

Most people, of course, spend their lives caring about the wrong things.

The worry about South Africa or Nicaragua. They spend so much time finding themselves that they lose their taxicabs. They don't see that what kind of napkin you get at a delicatessen is a matter of much significance in the world today. That's why they don't get linen.

The people of Nicaragua were suffering oppression.

This made us develop an awareness which eventually led us to commit ourselves to the struggle against the domination of the capitalists of our country in collusion with the U.S. government, i.e. imperialism.

I think there, there also had been just before I got to Honduras a rather spectacular capture of an arms shipment that from Nicaragua across Honduran test, territory destined for El Salvador and I think that some of that equipment had been also to Cuba and the Soviet bloc.