quote by Steven Soderbergh

When a film like Chris Nolan's Memento cannot get picked up, to me independent film is over. It's dead.

— Steven Soderbergh

Profound Nolan quotations

Nolan Ryan is pitching much better now that he has his curve ball straightened out.

I was obsessed with Batman as a kid. I did the film in part just to be near the Batmobile. But I also think [director] Christopher Nolan made a very fine, intelligent film.

Every hitter likes fastballs, just like everybody likes ice cream.

But you don't like it when someone's stuffing it into you by the gallon. That's what it feels like when Nolan Ryan's thrown balls by you.

Everybody is so sensitive, you'd think Nolan Ryan was pitching.

You don't face Nolan Ryan without your rest.

He's the only guy I go against that makes me go to bed before midnight.

Those were the Rommely women: Mary, the mother, Evy, Sissy, and Katie, her daughters, and Francie, who would grow up to be a Rommely woman even though her name was Nolan. They were all slender, frail creatures with wondering eyes and soft fluttery voices. But they were made out of thin invisible steel.

People want fun and escapism at the moment.

Look at the success of Guardians of the Galaxy. I think Nolan kick-started a very dark, bleak style of superhero escapism, and I think people have had enough of it.

The atmosphere and the environment that you get on a Chris Nolan film that he and Emma [Tomson] create is one where you feel very safe and very confident and able to experiment with characters. It's a great place to be as an actor.

What man in his 40s would not like to look in the mirror and find Nolan Ryan?

Nolan Bushnell, the creator of the Atari video game system, once stated, ‘Everyone who’s ever taken a shower has had an idea, It’s the person who gets out of the shower, dries off, and does something about it who makes a difference.

Those were the Rommely women: Mary, the mother, Evy, Sissy, and Katie, her daughters, and Francie, who would grow up to be a Rommely woman even though her name was Nolan. They were all slender, frail creatures with wondering eyes and soft fluttery voices. But they were made out of thin invisible steel.

Nolan Ryan helped me with baseball, and my dad passing away gave me a bigger heart.

It's depend of the communication, I think it's very important to let the director make his own vision of the character, not making a studio movie. Look the Dark Knight it's totally the vision of Nolan.

There's so much technology [in the Batman movies] that's unbelievable and seems unreal, so it's hard trying to get the audience to believe that it all exists. So we got Morgan Freeman to tell them that it's real. And that is why Christopher Nolan is a genius.

If Doctor Nolan asked me for the matches, I would say that I'd thought they were made of candy and had eaten them.

Nolan has the strangest affect on people.

You know, I think there's something very sad and little boy about him, but at the same time the way he goes about everything is so awkward and obnoxious. He can never say the right thing, you know? And I think if he just didn't try so hard and calmed down, people might actually like him a bit more!

All I had, originally, were pages of Nolan's dialogue.

I think his character serves the story in a nice way. He's a Greek chorus for the goings-on in the Hamptons.

The only description for Nolan in the script was that he's a very bad dresser.

I put on a red windbreaker and every other ugly, ill-fitting thing I could dig out. He was potentially written as a clean-cut nerd, but I wanted a darker spin.

I feel like the big twist shows are now off the table.

I think Westworld was probably the last one to Trojan horse this idea of the young man in black. They were doing non-linear storytelling, but disguising it. Jonah Nolan and Lisa Joy have spoken openly about how they just didn't think people were going to figure it out that fast.

Just watching Chris Nolan direct was amazing.

He is one of the most lovely people, which as you know doesn't always go hand-in-hand with great directors. But with Christopher Nolan, and there's only a few I think like him in Hollywood, that's absolutely true.

I really hope that I get to work with Chris [Nolan] some day.

I really enjoyed working on the first one [Batman franchise] and I wish I could have worked with Chris Nolan again and I hope to work with him again.

I remember when we were doing "Batman Begins" and to watch Chris Nolan go from "Memento" to "Batman" and take that leap from such a smaller size to a big movie, that's inspiring. But those movies are their own type of art and you have to really understand it and really know that world and I would have to take a long time to figure that out.Because my brain doesn't naturally go there.

There's no question about it. If you look at the map, there's hardly any [Democrats representing rural districts]. There's me, [Rick] Nolan, [Tim] Walz, [Dave] Loebsack and Cheri Bustos. So that's five. And all the rest of them are in urban cities. That's a problem.

For film, you know, the Tarantinos and Nolans of the world who are very focused on a certain kind of film aesthetic and a certain kind of presentation, to be honest, that comes from a place of privilege. It comes from a place of always having access to such, but when you ain't never - you can't see it because you can't even get to it.

Just women who are really eclectic, so every woman from Gwyneth Paltrow to Peggy Nolan, who has half a shaved head and has a totally wild aesthetic. They're woman who are doing things, running their own businesses, taking chances at different levels of success and different industries. A lot of my friends are creatives. It was just who I really adore and wanted to share with a greater audience.

J.J. Abrams and Jonah Nolan and Lisa Joy, who are brilliant people, so I knew it [Westworld] was going to be amazing.

I've got to say that when you're able to work with people like this, whether it's Gareth or Guillermo or Zack Snyder or Chris Nolan, it's a privilege to do this and I've never lost the awe, the awe factor of just going in and watching peoples reactions to what you've spent, in a lot of cases, years working on. That's a good way to put it, I love what I do and it's a privilege to do it.

The truth is at Legendary we really make movies that we want to see, and someday I'm sure that won't work but - I remember, it's obviously a completely different thing, but our first movie was Batman Begins, and there was a lot of things about Batman back then, and there was this guy named Christopher Nolan, that seemed to have worked out okay with him at the helm.

I guess I'm the only guy old enough to figure him (Nolan Ryan, 1-Hitter Game in 1991) out.

I would have played street cop number three if it meant getting to work with Chris Nolan.

And I think that if something doesn't make sense, forcing yourself to understand it from [Chris Nolan's] perspective makes you better.

When Chris Nolan is your director you are like, "I trust that, I'm wrong."

I think that I'm a pretty great producer, but the vision behind Batman is Chris Nolan. I'm there to do my best to help execute that vision, and I think I do a really good job, but the vision is Chris Nolan.

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