quote by Jack Lambert

If I could start my life all over again, I would be a professional football player, and you damn well better believe I would be a Pittsburgh Steeler.

— Jack Lambert

Promising Pittsburgh quotations

We're a road team. We're the Pittsburgh Steelers. We have fans everywhere.

As I and the rest of my Pittsburgh Steelers teammates prepared that week in late December 1974, we knew one thing: The road to the Super Bowl in the AFC went through Oakland. To achieve your dreams as a team, you had to slay the Oakland Raiders. They were the barometer of what it took to be a championship team.

How lucky I was to have played for the Pittsburgh Steelers fans.

A proud, hard-working people, who loves their football, and their players.

Pittsburgh isn't fancy, but it is real.

It's a working town and money doesn't come easy. I feel as much a part of this city as the cobblestone streets and the steel mills, people in this town expect an honest day's work, and I've it to them for a long, long time.


I want to bring back the pride and tradition long associated with the Pittsburgh Steelers, and more importantly, with the people of Pittsburgh.

I learned from Chuck Noll in Pittsburgh that speed and explosiveness on defense is the way to build a team. Both are difficult for your opponent to assimilate in practice and then in games it is even harder to match.

Never been to Sesame Street but I flip a Big Bird.

And I know "stealers" and they not from Pittsburgh.

I never wanted to be a dancer. It's true! I wanted to be a shortstop for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

If you grow up in the South Bronx today or in south-central Los Angeles or Pittsburgh or Philadelphia, you quickly come to understand that you have been set apart and that there's no will in this society to bring you back into the mainstream.


The woman is not just a pleasure, nor even a problem.

She is a meniscus that allows the absolute to have a shape, that lets him skate however briefly on the mystery, her presence luminous on the ordinary and the grand. Like the odor at night in Pittsburgh’s empty streets after summer rain on maples and sycamore.

In a way, I was born twice. I was born in 1934 and again in 1955 when I came to Pittsburgh. I am thankful to say that I lived two lives.

One night in Pittsburgh, thirty-thousand fans gave me a standing ovation when I caught a hot dog wrapper on the fly.

My parents demonstrated against the Vietnam war, they were into the civil rights movement, the feminist movement, they started the first vegetarian restaurant in Pittsburgh.

Winning the Super Bowl was obviously a great one, but the joy I felt of going to the Super Bowl, it was what I felt about the Pittsburgh Steelers and where we came from, the history of us to that point.


Imagine yourself sitting on top of a great thoroughbred horse.

You sit up there and you just feel that power. That's what it was like playing quarterback on that team [the Pittsburgh Steelers]. It was a great ride.

Pennsylvania is Philadelphia and Pittsburgh with Alabama in between.

I love to play for Pittsburgh. If they can't afford me, then I'd love to play in L.A. or New York.

Pittsburgh entered the core of my heart when I was a boy and cannot be torn out.

I always wanted everyone to like me. I wanted the city of Pittsburgh to be proud of me. But my first few seasons, I could to count the number of people on my bandwagon on one finger.


Usually when you play a team, you want to focus on one line.

Pittsburgh is the only team where you have to focus on one player [Mario Lemieux]. When he's coming toward you, all you see is him.

There's so much that I like about Pittsburgh, actually.

The cultural district and museums are wonderful, and I encourage everyone to check them out. And the food is excellent, too!

The road to the Super Bowl runs through Pittsburgh, sooner or later you've got to go to Pittsburgh.

I don't get back as much as I'd like to, so I don't have a lot of close ties [Pittsburgh], but I'll bleed black and gold until I die.

One time my whole family played hide and seek. They found my mother in Pittsburgh!


My major league debut came at old Busch Stadium on Grand Avenue in St.

Louis, against the Pittsburgh Pirates. The first pitch I threw was to third baseman Bob Bailey. It was a fastball, low and away. He ripped it for a home run down the left field line. I said, 'Damn, that was a pretty good pitch.

I was happier going back to my roots: training like men do in my hometown of Pittsburgh. Back home the guys in the gyms don't lift to look good; they're lifting to lift. They do it because they want to squat more and bench more.

I love meeting fans. The people who are fans of my books are really smart and dedicated, because some independent comics are hard to get. I will drive all the way to Pittsburgh or Detroit to put it in their hands.

I grew up in Los Angeles, and I've made movies all over the world.

.. I've been in New York, Norway, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, London - I've been in all these cities, shooting away in the winter, thinking, 'People who choose to live here are insane.

I should care about the education a child in Philadelphia, or Pittsburgh, or Erie, or Scranton received because if they didn't get a good education my life is diminished and all of our lives are enhanced if they get that good education. It is a shared enterprise and we need to recognize that.


On my return to Pittsburgh, I resolved to go back to the fundamental problems of electronic structure that I had contemplated abstractly many years earlier.

Bud Johnson, God rest his soul of fame, a tenor saxophonist.

Bud was always a big, big, big booster of mine and he always when I first met Bud in Pittsburgh when he came through there, he heard me sing and he wanted me to come to Chicago.

I love Pittsburgh. Most of my family still lives there and I try to get back a couple of times a year.

When I first went to Pittsburgh, I had never been there before, and we hadn't even decided to shoot there yet. I just went to see the location of Michael Chabon's novel. Once there, I became aware that Pittsburgh is a "wonder boy," in the narrow sense of the term, just as the human characters are.

We like to imagine that Shaun is in George Romero's universe, that it's happening at the same time as the Pittsburgh outbreak.