quote by Nathaniel Branden

What a great teacher, a great parent, a great psychotherapist and a great coach have in common is a deep belief in the potential of the person with whom they are concerned. They relate to the person from their vision of his or her worth and value.

— Nathaniel Branden

Unusual Psychotherapist quotations

I hope I am a psychotherapist's dream. I've spent enough hours in therapy.


The basic work of health professionals in general, and of psychotherapist s in particular, is to become full human beings and to inspire full human-beingness in other people who feel starved about their lives.

The psychotherapist ... tries to help the individual to be himself and to go it alone without giving unnecessary offense to his community, to be in the world (of social convention) but not of the world.

...an effective psychotherapist or psychoanalyst is a "microsurgeon of the mind" who helps patients make needed alterations in neuronal networks.

But there has also been a notable increase in recent years of these applications by a much wider slice of psychotherapists - far greater interest than ever before.


My dad is a doctor, a professor of psychiatry, and my mum is a psychotherapist.

Everyone who becomes a psychotherapist eventually adopts a theory that suits his needs.

God seems willing to act as the most sublime psychologist, psychotherapist, or even psychiatrist if we are willing.

It is indeed time for the clergyman and the psychotherapist to join forces.

The psychotherapist learns little or nothing from his successes.

They mainly confirm him in his mistakes, while his failures, on the other hand, are priceless experiences in that they not only open up the way to a deeper truth, but force him to change his views and methods.


The work of a psychotherapist involves being empathic and insightful with one's patients without getting too lost in their painful stories to be helpful.

My mother was an actress and my voice teacher, an incredible voice teacher.

My biological father is an actor, and my stepfather, who raised me along with my mother, is a psychotherapist. I was always supported in creative ventures.

Like the priestly cult of the Middle Ages, the modern priestly cult of "scientific" psychotherapists exist overwhelmingly to stultify or blunt a too-acute insight into the powers benumbed in our personalities by our prevailing culture.

I asked my mum, who's a very clever psychotherapist, and she says that kids love stories about death; they need it, they need to have stories that deal with death and explain it, as a place to put their fears.

The analytic psychotherapist thus has a threefold battle to wage -- in his own mind against the forces which seek to drag him down from the analytic level; outside the analysis, against opponents who dispute the importance he attaches to the sexual instinctual forces and hinder him from making use of them in his scientific technique; and inside the analysis, against his patients, who at first behave like opponents but later on reveal the overvaluation of sexual life which dominates them, and who try to make him captive to their socially untamed passion.


There seems to be this impression that if I really am a psychotherapist, I can't be serious about it. They think there must be something fishy going on.

Certainly there is such a thing as chemical depression, and for that, obviously, there are issues that psychotherapists are much more expert at speaking to, but I think there is a low-grade depression that actually prevails in our society. And most of us feel it.

Television has become the government, priest, psychotherapist - the legitimiser of our egos.

We know desire is rooted in absence and yearning.

What you don't have is often ten times richer than what you actually experience. An affair is a perfect erotic plot because it fits the erotic equation of psychotherapist Jack Morin: "Attraction plus obstacle equals excitement.".

Many psychotherapists believe laziness is usually just the symptom.

That the real problem is fear of failure, fear of success, or fear of authority.


I went to a psychotherapist for a year and a bit, and it was fantastic.

I went in with a very clear question: I couldn't work out why I behaved in a certain way in certain situations, and I got that answered.

A new question for the psychotherapist to ask is whether a theory can go beyond mere effectiveness in achieving either a so-called cure or even personal growth into its implications for the nature of an evolving society.

If there is one thing I've learned in thirty years as a psychotherapist, it is this: If you can let your experience happen, it will release its knots and unfold, leading to a deeper, more grounded experience of yourself. No matter how painful or scary your feelings appear to be, your willingness to engage with them draws forth your essential strength, leading in a more life-positive direction.

More than anything else I recall being, or trying very deliberately to be, a perfect child. Not a Goody Two-shoes, but a kid who did good, who worked hard and met every expectation. I strove to achieve in the excessive way that psychotherapists tend to regard with concern.

I became a psychotherapist because that's where people will unburden themselves, where they will show what is in their hearts.