quote by Abraham Lincoln

If you love something, set it free.

— Abraham Lincoln

Vibrant Trailer Park quotations

I didn't come from a trailer park. I grew up middle class and my dad had money and my mom made my lunch. I got a car when I was sixteen. I'm proud of that.


Trailer park quote The road to success is dotted with many tempting parking spaces.
The road to success is dotted with many tempting parking spaces.

I grew up in a trailer park in Bellingham, Washington.

Trailer park quote The road to success is lined with many tempting parking spaces.
The road to success is lined with many tempting parking spaces.
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Meaningful Trailer park quotes
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I don't think the government should be in the trailer-park business.

I don't think they know how to run a trailer park.

I was born in Darien, Connecticut, but in 1959, when I was four, my parents moved to the suburbs of Toronto. Then, in the late 1960s, they bought a cottage in a resort/trailer park in the Kawarthas region of Ontario, and we moved up there. I wrote a book about it in 2000 called 'Last Resort: Coming of Age in Cottage Country.

I'm happier than a tornado in a trailer park.


Trailer park quote Don't bunt. Aim out of the ball park. Aim for the company of immortals.
Don't bunt. Aim out of the ball park. Aim for the company of immortals.

If you love something let it go.. if it comes back its yours

Starkville is an Indian word for trailer park.

All of which is mostly bullshit. The reality is that it's just like any other Ponzi scheme: the guys at the top are doing pretty well, but the guys on the bottom are doing Amway pitches in trailer parks.

I'm just a girl from a trailer park who had a dream. I never thought this would ever happen.

All the way out I listen to the car AM radio, bad lyrics of trailer park love, gin and tonic love, strobe light love, lost and found love, lost and found and lost love, lost and lost and lost love—some people were having no luck at all. The DJ sounds quick and smooth and after-shaved, the rest of the world a mess by comparison.


I have little compassion for people in trailer parks who refuse to move after getting tornado warnings. How hard is it for them to relocate? Their houses have wheels.

I have five kids from three marriages.

I come from a trailer park. My sister and brother are both gay. I have multiple personalities.

The TV said you should ignore bullies and they would stop harassing you.

In practice this worked about half the time. The other half, you ended up with two tall boys shadowing you through a trailer park, their fingers taking little nips at your clothes, like dogs.

I don't know what I did in this life to deserve all of this.

I'm just a girl from a trailer park who had a dream.

Even though I don't have any larger spiritual or ideological system, there is some logic in concert with a huge number of beautiful, disconcerting, screwed-up variables that results in a certain visual pleasure in violent things. Like a broken egg yolk can be the most violent thing I've seen all day, if I'm in the right mood. But also tons of trash in the woods or a burned-up trailer park can also come across as especially violent.


Koolaid is goyish. All Drake's Cakes are goyish. Pumpernickel is Jewish, and, as you know, white bread is very goyish. Instant potatoes - goyish. Black cherry soda's very Jewish. Macaroons are very Jewish - very Jewish cake. Fruit salad is Jewish. Lime Jell-O is goyish. Lime soda is very goyish. Trailer parks are so goyish that Jews won't go near them.

The Internet is the trailer park for the soul.

I don't want to speak for everyone, but I think it really picks up where the other film left off. It's true to the format. A lot of times, sequels get overblown for the sake of doing it. Even in the trailer, 'there's eight people in the house', that's just the worst thing you can promote in a sequel. Two people, now there's eight, it's like Jurassic Park with the dinosaurs playing video games.

The Postal is a ruthless, Mad TV-type thing.

We sent out a DVD to the South Park producers, and they liked the movie so much that we can say now, "It's like South Park with real actors" on the trailers and posters.

I like to take CEOs into consumers' homes to see the "real world.

" CEOs have privileged lives with big incomes, lots of help, access to just about anything they wish. The average consumer lives on $53,000 a year and has daily tradeoffs and compromises that must be made. I took a CEO into a trailer park so he could observe first-hand - and understand - how consumers use his product.


I had a sense that my mother was struggling, when I was a kid, working twelve hour days, making $12,000 a year with two kids in a trailer park.

I had a friend who got pregnant at age 14 and wasn't quite sure who the father was. Her paternity test went a little something like this: “If it comes out black, its Darwin's and if it comes out white its Ray's.” This is how things were done in the trailer park.

When you're trying to look pretty, it's a lot easier to compare you to other people. I always felt intimidated in pilot season trying to audition for 'the girlfriend.' Whereas when it's like, 'you're auditioning for the part of this meth addict, trailer park whatever,' it's like, 'Great!'

If I want to read S.J. Perelman's Chicken Inspector No. 23 for the third time instead of some anguished, politically correct saga of a girl growing up in a trailer park in Kingman, Arizona, with an alcoholic mother who makes her straighten her naturally curly hair and won't let her date a Navajo boy or pursue her goal of becoming (naturally) a writer, I will. And I will laugh like a lunatic while doing it.

I really am just trying to tell stories.

But stories are often grounded in larger events and themes. They don't have to be - there's a big literature of trailer-park, kitchen-table fiction that's just about goings-on in the lives of ordinary people - but my own tastes run toward stories that in addition to being good stories are set against a backdrop that is interesting to read and learn about.


My mother was a barmaid and I was raised in a trailer park.

I'm used to that language. I put it on the screen so that people could interpret it as they wish.

He looked like those paintings of baby angels - what do you call them, hubbubs? No cherubs. That's it. He looked like a cherub who'd turned middle-aged in a trailer park.

Lula had Eminem cranked up. He was rapping about trailer park girls and how they go round the outside, and I was wondering what the heck that meant. I'm a white girl from Trenton. I don't know these things. I need a rap cheat sheet.