Before I built a wall I'd ask to knowWhat I was walling in or walling out,And to whom I was like to give offense.

In many ways, history is marked as 'before' and 'after' Rosa Parks.

She sat down in order that we all might stand up, and the walls of segregation came down.

In the days of segregation, when blacks were limited to certain neighborhoods, you could look around the black community and identify who the leaders were.

I am also very proud to be a liberal.

Why is that so terrible these days? The liberals were liberators -- they fought slavery, fought for women to have the right to vote, fought against Hitler, Stalin, fought to end segregation, fought to end apartheid. Liberals put an end to child labor and they gave us the five day work week! What's to be ashamed of?

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As a matter of history, the Fourteenth Amendment was not understood to ban segregation on the basis of race.

That white uniform was her 'pass' to get into white places with us - the grocery store, the state fair, the movies. Even though this was the 70s and the segregation laws had changed, the 'rules' had not.

I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny, and I say segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever.

Segregation was wrong when it was forced by white people, and I believe it is still wrong when it is requested by black people.

From slavery to segregation, we remember that America did not always live up to its ideals. In fact, we often fell far short of them. But we also learned that fundamental to our national character is the drive to live out the true meaning of our creed.

Segregation was a burden for many blacks, because the end of the civil war and the amendments added to the constitution elevated expectations beyond reality in some respects.

Segregation in the South is honest, open and aboveboard.

Of the two systems, or styles of segregation, the Northern and the Southern, there is no doubt whatever in my mind which is the better.

While housing discrimination and segregation in 2005 still affect millions of people, that's not the way it has to be. Some things can change and should.

We do not show the Negro how to overcome segregation, but we teach him how to accept it as final and just.

And thus goes segregation which is the most far-reaching development in the history of the Negro since the enslavement of the race.

Segregation never brought anyone anything except trouble.

The grand irony, however, is that Southern segregation was not brought to an end, nor redneck violence dramatically reduced, by violence.

I, like many members of my generation, was concerned with segregation and the repeated violation of civil rights.

It was the best route to get folks to understand segregation fast.

Civil rights and women's rights had a clear history. Making the transition to rights for people with disabilities became easier because we had the history of the other two.

What is our greatest enemy? Segregation.

During the days of segregation, there was not a place of higher learning for African Americans. They were simply not welcome in many of the traditional schools. And from this backward policy grew the network of historical black colleges and universities.

I didn't actually realise what apartheid meant.

I'm probably a bit naive, but I thought it was more of a vague segregation, like on the beaches and buses.

We didn't have any segregation at the Cotton Club. No. The Cotton Club was wide open, it was free.

Everybody did something. It was very entertaining. We had a lot of fun. Lot of fun. And there was no segregation, that I could see. I never saw any.

Marriage is an institution fits in perfect harmony with the laws of nature;

whereas systems of slavery and segregation were designed to brutally oppress people and thereby violated the laws of nature.

The tragedy of the civil rights movement is that just as it achieved the beginning of the end of racial segregation, white educated elites became swept up in the glamour of the sexual revolution.

When you live under the power of terror and segregation, you can't ever start a work of art.

In so many ways, segregation shaped me, and education liberated me.

I grew up in the South under segregation.

So, I know what terrorism feels like - when your father could be taken out in the middle of the night and lynched just because he didn't look like he was in an obeying frame of mind when a white person said something he must do. I mean, that's terrorism, too.

My family was a poor farming family, and we lived under absolute segregation.

There is no scriptural basis for segregation.

Segregation is that which is forced upon an inferior by a superior.

Separation is done voluntarily by two equals.

America preaches integration and practices segregation.

For me, the real earth is that chosen part of the universe, still almost universally dispersed and in course of gradual segregation, but which is little by little taking on body and form in Christ.

I have never been what you would call just an integrationist.

I know I've been called that... Integrating that bus wouldn't mean more equality. Even when there was segregation, there was plenty of integration in the South, but it was for the benefit and convenience of the white person, not us.

We still have many neighborhoods that are racially identified.

We still have many schools that even though the days of state-enforced segregation are gone, segregation because of geographical boundaries remains.

We've come a long way from the days where there was state-enforced segregation.

But we still have a way to go.

In this country, there is a segregation of Black Turks and White Turks.

Your brother Tayyip belongs to the Black Turks.

The March on Washington affirmed our values as a people: equality and opportunity for all. Forty-one years ago, during a time of segregation, these were an ideal.

An awful lot of people come to college with this strange idea that there's no longer segregation in America's schools, that our schools are basically equal; neither of these things is true.

The legal battle against segregation is won, but the community battle goes on.