What are the best Aldous Huxley quotes?

Accurate and famous quotes by Aldous Huxley about life, people, happiness, work, pleasure. Aldous Huxley is well-known English novelist with many wise quotes. You can read the best of all time and enjoy Top 10 lists. Share the best Aldous Huxley sayings with your friends and family.


  1. To travel is to discover that everyone is wrong about other countries.


  2. Experience is not what happens to you; it's what you do with what happens to you.


  3. The most valuable of all education is the ability to make yourself do the thing you have to do, when it has to be done, whether you like it or not.


  4. Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.


  5. The more powerful and original a mind, the more it will incline towards the religion of solitude.


  6. Experience teaches only the teachable.

    • experience

  7. An intellectual is a person who has discovered something more interesting than sex.


  8. After silence that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.


  9. Most human beings have an almost infinite capacity for taking things for granted.


  10. It takes two to make a murder. There are born victims, born to have their throats cut, as the cut-throats are born to be hanged.


  11. Most ignorance is invincible ignorance.We don't know because we don't want to know.


  12. To his dog, every man is Napoleon; hence the constant popularity of dogs.


  13. You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad.


  14. The only completely consistent people are the dead.


  15. The charm of history and its enigmatic lesson consist in the fact that, from age to age, nothing changes and yet everything is completely different.


  16. We are all geniuses up to the age of ten.


  17. If most of us remain ignorant of ourselves, it is because self-knowledge is painful and we prefer the pleasures of illusion.


  18. Good is a product of the ethical and spiritual artistry of individuals; it cannot be mass-produced.


  19. Every man's memory is his private literature.


  20. Technological progress has merely provided us with more efficient means for going backwards.


  21. It's with bad sentiments that one makes good novels.


  22. Man approaches the unattainable truth through a succession of errors.


  23. There's only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that's your own self.


  24. We participate in tragedy. At comedy we only look.


  25. Sons have always a rebellious wish to be disillusioned by that which charmed their fathers.


  26. Several excuses are always less convincing than one.


  27. Thought must be divided against itself before it can come to any knowledge of itself.


  28. Hell isn't merely paved with good intentions; it's walled and roofed with them. Yes, and furnished too.


  29. Writers write to influence their readers, their preachers, their auditors, but always, at bottom, to be more themselves.


  30. An atheist is a person who has no invisible means of support



Top 10 quotes by Aldous Huxley

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Aldous Huxley image quotes

What are the best Aldous Huxley images quotes? Read and bookmark finest sayings from Aldous Huxley, embed as quotes on beautiful images. Those images have life quotes, people quotes, happiness quotes, work quotes, pleasure quotes.


  1. Picture quote by Aldous Huxley about improve

    There's only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that's your own self.


  2. Picture quote by Aldous Huxley about fun

    Never put off till tomorrow the fun you can have today.


  3. Picture quote by Aldous Huxley about music

    After silence, that which comes from nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.


  4. Picture quote by Aldous Huxley about world

    Maybe this world is another planet's hell.


That are top sayings from Aldous Huxley as picture quotes. Access more quotations by Aldous Huxley with images on Pinterest.

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About Aldous Huxley

Name Aldous Huxley
About Aldous Leonard Huxley was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxl
Quotes 167 quotes
Nationality English
Profession Novelist
Birthday July 26, 1894
Top topics life, people, happiness, work, pleasure

Where is Aldous Huxley from? Aldous Huxley is English who said awesome wise words. Well-known and respected in English society for wise sayings. The following quotations and images represent the English nature embed in Aldous Huxley's character.

What Aldous Huxley was famous for? Aldous Huxley is famous novelist with many good quotes. Influential and well recognized novelist all over the world. Browse a lot of Aldous Huxley books and reference books with quotes from Aldous Huxley on Amazon.


What are the best life quotes by Aldous Huxley?


    Consistency is contrary to nature, contrary to life. The only completely consistent people are dead.


    Maybe this world is another planet's hell.


    A life-worshipper's philosophy is comprehensive. He is at one moment a positivist and at another a mystic: now haunted by the thought of death and now a Dionysian child of nature; now a pessimist and now, with a change of lover or liver or even the weather, an exuberant believer that God's in his heaven and all's right with the world.


    Bondage is the life of personality, and for bondage the personal self will fight with tireless resourcefulness and the most stubborn cunning.


    Perhaps it's good for one to suffer. Can an artist do anything if he's happy? Would he ever want to do anything? What is art, after all, but a protest against the horrible inclemency of life?


    Who lives longer? The man who takes heroin for two years and dies, or a man who lives on roast beef, water and potatoes 'till 95? One passes his 24 months in eternity. All the years of the beefeater are lived only in time.

    • life

    The soul of wit may become the very body of untruth. However elegant and memorable, brevity can never, in the nature of things, do justice to all the facts of a complex situations. On such a theme one can be brief only by omission and simplification. Omission and simplification help us to understand - but help is, in many cases, to understand the wrong thing; for our comprehension may be only of the abbreviator's neatly formulated notions, not of the vast, ramifying reality from which these notions have been so arbitrarily abstracted.


    The worst enemy of life, freedom and the common decencies is total anarchy; their second worst enemy is total efficiency.

    • life

    It is a bit embarrassing to have been concerned with the human problem all one's life and find at the end that one has no more to offer by way of advice than 'try to be a little kinder.'

    • life

More life quotes or go to table of contents


What are the best people quotes by Aldous Huxley?


    Consistency is contrary to nature, contrary to life. The only completely consistent people are dead.

    • completely

    The impulse to cruelty is, in many people, almost as violent as the impulse to sexual love - almost as violent and much more mischievous.


    The propagandist's purpose is to make one set of people forget that certain other sets of people are human.


    People intoxicate themselves with work so they won't see how they really are.


    Happiness is a hard master, particularly other people's happiness.


More people quotes or go to table of contents


What are the best happiness quotes by Aldous Huxley?


    I can sympathize with people's pains, but not with their pleasures. There is something curiously boring about somebody else's happiness.

    • happiness

    Actual happiness looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn

    • happiness

    God isn't compatible with machinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness. You must make your choice. Our civilization has chosen machinery and medicine and happiness.


    Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn't nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.

    • happiness

    Happiness is a hard master, particularly other people's happiness.

    • happiness

More happiness quotes or go to table of contents


What are the best work quotes by Aldous Huxley?


    Like every man of sense and good feeling, I abominate work.

    • work

    Industrial man --a sentient reciprocating engine having a fluctuating output, coupled to an iron wheel revolving with uniform velocity. And then we wonder why this should be the golden age of revolution and mental derangement.

    • work

    People intoxicate themselves with work so they won't see how they really are.

    • work

    Europe is so well gardened that it resembles a work of art, a scientific theory, a neat metaphysical system. Man has re-created Europe in his own image.

    • work

More work quotes or go to table of contents


What are the best pleasure quotes by Aldous Huxley?


    Speed, it seems to me, provides the one genuinely modern pleasure.


    Pleasure cannot be shared; like Pain, it can only be experienced or inflicted, and when we give pleasure to our Lovers or bestow Charity upon the Needy, we do so, not to gratify the object of our Benevolence, but only ourselves. For the Truth is that we are kind for the same reason as we are cruel, in order that we may enhance the sense of our own Power.

    • pleasure

    Your true traveller finds boredom rather agreeable than painful. It is the symbol of his liberty - his excessive freedom. He accepts his boredom, when it comes, not merely philosophically, but almost with pleasure.


    Amour is the one human activity of any importance in which laughter and pleasure preponderate, if ever so slightly, over misery and pain.


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More quotes by Aldous Huxley

Want some more good quotations by Aldous Huxley? Explore the rest of 167 sayings by Aldous Huxley.


Every man who knows how to read has it in his power to magnify himself, to multiply the ways in which he exists, to make his life full, significant and interesting.

  • education

The proper study of mankind is books.


That we are not much sicker and much madder than we are is due exclusively to that most blessed and blessing of all natural graces, sleep.


A man may be a pessimistic determinist before lunch and an optimistic believer in the will's freedom after it.




There is no substitute for talent. Industry and all the virtues are of no avail.


Man is an intelligence, not served by, but in servitude to his organs.


All gods are homemade, and it is we who pull their strings, and so, give them the power to pull ours.


Those who believe that they are exclusively in the right are generally those who achieve something.


Children are remarkable for their intelligence and ardor, for their curiosity, their intolerance of shams, the clarity and ruthlessness of their vision.


Speed, it seems to me, provides the one genuinely modern pleasure.

  • pleasure

Consistency is contrary to nature, contrary to life. The only completely consistent people are dead.

  • completely

From their experience or from the recorded experience of others (history), men learn only what their passions and their metaphysical prejudices allow them to learn.

  • experience

There's only one effectively redemptive sacrifice, the sacrifice of self-will to make room for the knowledge of God.


If you want to be a psychological novelist and write about human beings, the best thing you can do is keep a pair of cats.


My fate cannot be mastered; it can only be collaborated with and thereby, to some extent, directed. Nor am I the captain of my soul; I am only its noisiest passenger.


What we feel and think and are is to a great extent determined by the state of our ductless glands and viscera.


Proverbs are always platitudes until you have personally experienced the truth of them.


Orthodoxy is the diehard of the world of thought. It learns not, neither can it forget.


An unexciting truth may be eclipsed by a thrilling lie.


Facts are ventriloquist's dummies. Sitting on a wise man's knee they may be made to utter words of wisdom; elsewhere, they say nothing, or talk nonsense.

  • facts

Most of one's life is one prolonged effort to prevent oneself thinking.

  • thought

What is absurd and monstrous about war is that men who have no personal quarrel should be trained to murder one another in cold blood.


Like every man of sense and good feeling, I abominate work.

  • work

I wanted to change the world. But I have found that the only thing one can be sure of changing is oneself.


Men do not learn much from the lessons of history and that is the most important of all the lessons of history.


Defined in psychological terms, a fanatic is a man who consciously over-compensates a secret doubt.


There isn't any formula or method. You learn to love by loving - by paying attention and doing what one thereby discovers has to be done.


I'm afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.


Official dignity tends to increase in inverse ratio to the importance of the country in which the office is held.


A fanatic is a man who consciously over compensates a secret doubt.

  • fanaticism

Maybe this world is another planet's hell.

  • hell

The quality of moral behaviour varies in inverse ratio to the number of human beings involved.


The impulse to cruelty is, in many people, almost as violent as the impulse to sexual love - almost as violent and much more mischievous.

  • almost

That all men are equal is a proposition to which, at ordinary times, no sane human being has ever given his assent.


Single-mindedness is all very well in cows or baboons; in an animal claiming to belong to the same species as Shakespeare it is simply disgraceful.


I can sympathize with people's pains, but not with their pleasures. There is something curiously boring about somebody else's happiness.

  • happiness

The secret of genius is to carry the spirit of the child into old age, which mean never losing your enthusiasm.


Idealism is the noble toga that political gentlemen drape over their will to power.


The condition of being forgiven is self-abandonment. The proud man prefers self-reproach, however painful --because the reproached self isn't abandoned; it remains intact.


God isn't compatible with machinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness. You must make your choice. Our civilization has chosen machinery and medicine and happiness.

  • choice

Feasts must be solemn and rare, or else they cease to be feasts.


The worst enemy of life, freedom and the common decencies is total anarchy; their second worst enemy is total efficiency.

  • life

Actual happiness looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn

  • happiness

Now, a corpse, poor thing, is an untouchable and the process of decay is, of all pieces of bad manners, the vulgarest imaginable. For a corpse is, by definition, a person absolutely devoid of savoir vivre.


A life-worshipper's philosophy is comprehensive. He is at one moment a positivist and at another a mystic: now haunted by the thought of death and now a Dionysian child of nature; now a pessimist and now, with a change of lover or liver or even the weather, an exuberant believer that God's in his heaven and all's right with the world.

  • life

Most vices demand considerable self-sacrifices. There is no greater mistake than to suppose that a vicious life is a life of uninterrupted pleasure. It is a life almost as wearisome and painful -- if strenuously led -- as Christian's in The Pilgrim's Progress.


Uncontrolled, the hunger and thirst after God may become an obstacle, cutting off the soul from what it desires. If a man would travel far along the mystic road, he must learn to desire God intensely but in stillness, passively and yet with all his heart and mind and strength.


The most distressing thing that can happen to a prophet is to be proved wrong. The next most distressing thing is to be proved right.


Cynical realism is the intelligent man's best excuse for doing nothing in an intolerable situation.


The history of any nation follows an undulatory course. In the trough of the wave we find more or less complete anarchy; but the crest is not more or less complete Utopia, but only, at best, a tolerably humane, partially free and fairly just society that invariably carries within itself the seeds of its own decadence.


There was a thing called Heaven; but all the same they used to drink enormous quantities of alcohol.


So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly arise and make them miserable.


One of the many reasons for the bewildering and tragic character of human existence is the fact that social organization is at once necessary and fatal. Men are forever creating such organizations for their own convenience and forever finding themselves the victims of their home-made monsters.


There is no substitute for talent. Industry and all its virtues are of no avail.


The vast majority of human beings dislike and even actually dread all notions with which they are not familiar... Hence it comes about that at their first appearance innovators have generally been persecuted, and always derided as fools and madmen.


The most shocking fact about war is that its victims and its instruments are individual human beings, and that these individual beings are condemned by the monstrous conventions of politics to murder or be murdered in quarrels not their own.


The brotherhood of men does not imply their equality. Families have their fools and their men of genius, their black sheep and their saints, their worldly successes and their worldly failures. A man should treat his brothers lovingly and with justice, according to the deserts of each. But the deserts of every brother are not the same.


If it were not for the intellectual snobs who pay -- in solid cash -- the tribute which philistinism owes to culture, the arts would perish with their starving practitioners. Let us thank heaven for hypocrisy.


The Savage interrupted him. But isn't it natural to feel there's a God? You might as well ask if it's natural to do up one's trousers with zippers, said the Controller sarcastically. You remind me of another of those old fellows called Bradley. He defined philosophy as the finding of bad reason for what one believes by instinct. As if one believed anything by instinct! One believes things because one has been conditioned to believe them. Finding bad reasons for what one believes for other bad reasons–that's philosophy. People believe in God because they've been conditioned to.


I have discovered the most exciting, the most arduous literary form of all, the most difficult to master, the most pregnant in curious possibilities. I mean the advertisement. It is far easier to write ten passably effective Sonnets, good enough to take in the not too inquiring critic, than one effective advertisement that will take in a few thousand of the uncritical buying public.


People intoxicate themselves with work so they won't see how they really are.

  • work

Perhaps it's good for one to suffer. Can an artist do anything if he's happy? Would he ever want to do anything? What is art, after all, but a protest against the horrible inclemency of life?

  • against

It is perfectly possible for a man to be out of prison and yet not free—to be under no physical constraint and yet be a psychological captive, compelled to think, feel and act as the representatives of the national state, or of some private interest within the nation wants him to think, feel and act. . . . To him the walls of his prison are invisible and he believes himself to be free.

  • freedom

One of the great attractions of patriotism - it fulfills our worst wishes. In the person of our nation we are able, vicariously, to bully and cheat. Bully and cheat, what's more, with a feeling that we are profoundly virtuous.


Your true traveller finds boredom rather agreeable than painful. It is the symbol of his liberty - his excessive freedom. He accepts his boredom, when it comes, not merely philosophically, but almost with pleasure.

  • accepts

Industrial man --a sentient reciprocating engine having a fluctuating output, coupled to an iron wheel revolving with uniform velocity. And then we wonder why this should be the golden age of revolution and mental derangement.

  • work

The author of the Iliad is either Homer or, if not Homer, somebody else of the same name.


The finest works of art are precious, among other reasons, because they make it possible for us to know, if only imperfectly and for a little while, what it actually feels like to think subtly and feel nobly.

  • art

If human beings were shown what they're really like, they'd either kill one another as vermin, or hang themselves.


Silence is as full of potential wisdom and wit as the unshown marble of great sculpture. The silent bear no witness against themselves.


To associate with other like-minded people in small, purposeful groups is for the great majority of men and women a source of profound psychological satisfaction. Exclusiveness will add to the pleasure of being several, but at one; and secrecy will intensify it almost to ecstasy.


The spiritual journey does not consist of arriving at a new destination where a person gains what he did not have, or becomes what he is not. It consists in the dissipation of one's own ignorance concerning one's self and life, and gradual growth of that understanding, which begins a spiritual awakening. The finding of God is coming to one's self.


Habit converts luxurious enjoyments into dull and daily necessities.


Chronic remorse, as all the moralists are agreed, is a most undesirable sentiment. If you have behaved badly, repent, make what amends you can and address yourself to the task of behaving better next time. On no account brood over your wrongdoing. Rolling in the muck is not the best way of getting clean.


The quality of moral behavior varies in inverse ratio to the number of human beings involved.


No social stability without individual stability.

  • society

People will insist on treating the mons Veneris as though it were Mount Everest. Too silly!


Science and art are only too often a superior kind of dope, possessing this advantage over booze and morphia: that they can be indulged in with a good conscience and with the conviction that, in the process of indulging, one is leading the higher life


Ending is better than mending.


Specialized meaninglessness has come to be regarded, in certain circles, as a kind of hallmark of true science.


Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn't nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.

  • happiness

Science has explained nothing; the more we know the more fantastic the world becomes and the profounder the surrounding darkness.

  • science

The poet is born with the capacity of arranging words in such a way that something of the quality of the graces and inspirations he has received can make itself felt to other human beings in the white spaces, so to speak, between the lines of his verse. This is a great and precious gift; but if the poet remains content with his gift, if he persists in worshipping the beauty in art and nature without going on to make himself capable, through selflessness, of apprehending Beauty as it is in the divine Ground, then he is only an idolater.


A democracy which makes or even effectively prepares for modern, scientific war must necessarily cease to be democratic. No country can be really well prepared for modern war unless it is governed by a tyrant, at the head of a highly trained and perfectly obedient bureaucracy.


De Sade is the one completely consistent and thoroughgoing revolutionary of history.

  • history

Human contacts have been so highly valued in the past only because reading was not a common accomplishment.... The world, you must remember, is only just becoming literate. As reading becomes more and more habitual and widespread, an ever-increasing number of people will discover that books will give them all the pleasures of social life and none of its intolerable tedium.


Bondage is the life of personality, and for bondage the personal self will fight with tireless resourcefulness and the most stubborn cunning.

  • bondage

We are living now, not in the delicious intoxication induced by the early successes of science, but in a rather grisly morning-after, when it has become apparent that what triumphant science has done hitherto is to improve the means for achieving unimproved or actually deteriorated ends.

  • science

Amour is the one human activity of any importance in which laughter and pleasure preponderate, if ever so slightly, over misery and pain.

  • pain

Beauty for some provides escape, who gain a happiness in eyeing the gorgeous buttocks of the ape or Autumn sunsets exquisitely dying.


Every man with a little leisure and enough money for railway tickets, every man, indeed, who knows how to read, has it in his power to magnify himself, to multiply the ways in which he exists, to make his life full, significant and interesting.


Ignore death up to the last moment; then, when it can't be ignored any longer, have yourself squirted full of morphia and shuffle off in a coma. Thoroughly sensible, humane and scientific, eh?

  • death

Which is better: to have fun with fungi or to have Idiocy with ideology, to have wars because of words, to have tomorrow's misdeeds out of yesterday's miscreeds?

  • drugs

Words, words, words! They shut one off from the universe. Three quarters of the time one's never in contact with things, only with the beastly words that stand for them.


You never see animals going through the absurd and often horrible fooleries of magic and religion. . . . Dogs do not ritually urinate in the hope of persuading heaven to do the same and send down rain. Asses do not bray a liturgy to cloudless skies. Nor do cats attempt, by abstinence from cat's meat, to wheedle the feline spirits into benevolence. Only man behaves with such gratuitous folly. It is the price he has to pay for being intelligent but not, as yet, quite intelligent enough.


Chastity—the most unnatural of all the sexual perversions, he added parenthetically, out of Remy de Gourmont.


A belief in hell and the knowledge that every ambition is doomed to frustration at the hands of a skeleton have never prevented the majority of human beings from behaving as though death were no more than an unfounded rumor.

  • death

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.

  • history

There are confessable agonies, sufferings of which one can positively be proud. Of bereavement, of parting, of the sense of sin and the fear of death the poets have eloquently spoken. They command the world's sympathy. But there are also discreditable anguishes, no less excruciating than the others, but of which the sufferer dare not, cannot speak. The anguish of thwarted desire, for example.

  • desires

A squat gray building of only thirty-four stories.


The soul of wit may become the very body of untruth. However elegant and memorable, brevity can never, in the nature of things, do justice to all the facts of a complex situations. On such a theme one can be brief only by omission and simplification. Omission and simplification help us to understand - but help is, in many cases, to understand the wrong thing; for our comprehension may be only of the abbreviator's neatly formulated notions, not of the vast, ramifying reality from which these notions have been so arbitrarily abstracted.

  • real

Morality is always the product of terror; its chains and strait-waistcoats are fashioned by those who dare not trust others, because they dare not trust themselves, to walk in liberty.

  • morals

Words from the thread on which we string our experiences.


There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.


Modern man's besetting temptation is to sacrifice his direct perceptions and spontaneous feelings to his reasoned reflections; to prefer in all circumstances the verdict of his intellect to that of his immediate intuitions.


Tudo que acontece é intrinsecamente semelhante ao homem a quem acontece


Pleasure cannot be shared; like Pain, it can only be experienced or inflicted, and when we give pleasure to our Lovers or bestow Charity upon the Needy, we do so, not to gratify the object of our Benevolence, but only ourselves. For the Truth is that we are kind for the same reason as we are cruel, in order that we may enhance the sense of our own Power.

  • pleasure

But a priest's life is not supposed to be well-rounded; it is supposed to be one-pointed -- a compass, not a weathercock.

  • religion

You should hurry up and acquire the cigar habit. It's one of the major happinesses. And so much more lasting than love, so much less costly in emotional wear and tear.


The propagandist's purpose is to make one set of people forget that certain other sets of people are human.

  • people

My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing.


Pure Spirit, one hundred degrees proof -- that's a drink that only the most hardened contemplation-guzzlers indulge in. Bodhisattvas dilute their Nirvana with equal parts of love and work.


A large city cannot be experientially known; its life is too manifold for any individual to be able to participate in it.


There's only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that's your own self. So you have to begin there, not outside, not on other people. That comes afterward, when you've worked on your own corner.


It is possible to argue that the really influential book is not that which converts ten millions of casual readers, but rather that which converts the very few who, at any given moment, succeed in seizing power. Marx and Sorel have been influential in the modern world, not so much because they were best-sellers (Sorel in particular was not at all a widely read author), but because among their few readers were two men, called respectively Lenin and Mussolini.


The amelioration of the world cannot be achieved by sacrifices in moments of crisis; it depends on the efforts made and constantly repeated during the humdrum, uninspiring periods, which separate one crisis from another, and of which normal lives mainly consist.


Happiness is a hard master, particularly other people's happiness.

  • happiness

Who lives longer? The man who takes heroin for two years and dies, or a man who lives on roast beef, water and potatoes 'till 95? One passes his 24 months in eternity. All the years of the beefeater are lived only in time.

  • life

What with making their way and enjoying what they have won, heroes have no time to think. But the sons of heroes - ah, they have all the necessary leisure.


Abused as we abuse it at present, dramatic art is in no sense cathartic; it is merely a form of emotional masturbation. It is the rarest thing to find a player who has not had his character affected for the worse by the practice of his profession. Nobody can make a habit of self-exhibition, nobody can exploit his personality for the sake of exercising a kind of hypnotic power over others, and remain untouched by the process.



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When was Aldous Huxley birthday? Aldous Huxley was born on July 26, 1894.

Who is Aldous Huxley? Some facts about Aldous Huxley from biography. Aldous Leonard Huxley was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. He spent the latter part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death in 1963. Best known for his novels and wide-ranging output of essays, he also publ... Read more about Aldous Huxley on Wikipedia or watch videos with quotes from Aldous Huxley on YouTube. Browse a lot of books about Aldous Huxley on Amazon to get more reference.

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