People sometimes attribute my success to my genius; all the genius I know anything about is hard work.

— Alexander Hamilton

The most controversy Alexander Hamilton quotes to discover and learn by heart

When a government betrays the people by amassing too much power and becoming tyrannical, the people have no choice but to exercise their original right of self-defense — to fight the government.

602

The people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government and to reform, alter, or totally change the same when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.

427

I think the first duty of society is justice.

397
Alexander Hamilton quote If you don't stand for something, you wi

If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

10

Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike.

377

There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism.

366

Foreign influence is truly the Grecian horse to a republic.

We cannot be too careful to exclude its influence.

334

He who stands for nothing will fall for anything.

326

To my utter astonishment I saw an airship descending over my cow lot.

It was occupied by six of the strangest beings I ever saw. They were jabbering together, but we could not understand a word they said.

307

It's not tyranny we desire; it's a just, limited, federal government.

266

There are seasons in every country when noise and impudence pass current for worth; and in popular commotions especially, the clamors of interested and factious men are often mistaken for patriotism.

261

The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed.

226

[H]owever weak our country may be, I hope we shall never sacrifice our liberties.

210

About Alexander Hamilton

Quotes 362 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Politician
Birthday October 16

I have carefully examined the evidences of the Christian religion, and if I was sitting as a juror upon its authenticity I would unhesitatingly give my verdict in its favor. I can prove its truth as clearly as any proposition ever submitted to the mind of man.

209

A sacred respect for the constitutional law is the vital principle, the sustaining energy of a free government.

198

Ambition without principle never was long under the guidance of good sense.

172

Our countrymen have all the folly of the ass and all the passiveness of the sheep.

146

I would die to preserve the law upon a solid foundation;

but take away liberty, and the foundation is destroyed.

146

It is the Press which has corrupted our political morals - and it is to the Press we must look for the means of our political regeneration.

145

Remember civil and religious liberty always go together: if the foundation of the one be sapped, the other will fall of course.

137

The honor of a nation is its life. Deliberately to abandon it is to commit an act of political suicide.

131

It has been observed that a pure democracy if it were practicable would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position is more false than this. The ancient democracies in which the people themselves deliberated never possessed one good feature of government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure deformity.

130

The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself; and can never be erased.

129

The people are turbulent and changing; they seldom judge right or make good decision.

125

If it were to be asked, What is the most sacred duty and the greatest source of our security in a Republic? The answer would be, An inviolable respect for the Constitution and Laws - the first growing out of the last . . . . A sacred respect for the constitutional law is the vital principle, the sustaining energy of a free government.

121

We are now forming a republican government.

Real liberty is never found in despotism or the extremes of democracy, but in moderate governments.

111

The natural cure for an ill-administration, in a popular or representative constitution, is a change of men.

107

When the sword is once drawn, the passions of men observe no bounds of moderation.

95

Hard words are very rarely useful. Real firmness is good for every thing. Strut is good for nothing.

86

. . . [The Judicial Branch] may truly be said to have neither FORCE nor WILL, but merely judgment; and must ultimately depend upon the aid of the executive arm even for the efficacy of its judgments.

77

Nothing could be more ill-judged than that intolerant spirit which has, at all times, characterized political parties.

73

Constitutions should consist only of general provisions;

the reason is that they must necessarily be permanent, and that they cannot calculate for the possible change of things.

72

The love for our native land strengthens our individual and national character.

61

A national debt if it is not excessive will be to us a national blessing;

it will be powerfull cement of our union. It will also create a necessity for keeping up taxation to a degree which without being oppressive, will be a spur to industry.

55

A fondness for power is implanted in most men, and it is natural to abuse it when acquired.

54

If the federal government should overpass the just bounds of its authority and make a tyrannical use of its powers, the people, whose creature it is, must appeal to the standard they have formed, and take such measures to redress the injury done to the Constitution as the exigency may suggest and prudence justify.

52

Of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people, commencing demagogues and ending tyrants.

49

We must make the best of those ills which cannot be avoided.

49

[If you understood the natural rights of mankind,] [y]ou would be convinced that natural liberty is a gift of the beneficent Creator to the whole human race, and that civil liberty is founded in that, and cannot be wrested from any people without the most manifest violation of justice.

49

Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of man will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice without constraint.

46

Civil liberty is only natural liberty, modified and secured by the sanctions of civil society. It is not a thing, in its own nature, precarious and dependent on human will and caprice; but it is conformable to the constitution of man, as well as necessary to the well-being of society.

45

As to Taxes, they are evidently inseparable from Government.

It is impossible without them to pay the debts of the nation, to protect it from foreign danger, or to secure individuals from lawless violence and rapine.

44

In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place, oblige it to control itself.

35

What is the most sacred duty and the greatest source of our security in a Republic? An inviolable respect for the Constitution and Laws.

34

And it is long since I have learned to hold popular opinion of no value.

34

Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive, that, in a government in which they are separated from each other, the judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution; because it will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them.

33

Experience teaches, that men are often so much governed by what they are accustomed to see and practice, that the simplest and most obvious improvements . . . are adopted with hesitation, reluctance, and slow gradations.

31

Now, mark my words. So long as we are a young and virtuous people, this instument will bind us together in mutual interests, mutual welfare, and mutual happiness. But when we become old and corrupt, it will bind no longer.

29

Americans rouse - be unanimous, be virtuous, be firm, exert your courage, trust in Heaven, and nobly defy the enemies both of God and man!

29

Happy will it be for ourselves, and most honorable for human nature, if we have wisdom and virtue enough to set so glorious an example to mankind!

28
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