Economic growth without investment in human development is unsustainable - and unethical.

— Amartya Sen

The most vibrant Amartya Sen quotes that will activate your desire to change

Human development, as an approach, is concerned with what I take to be the basic development idea: namely, advancing the richness of human life, rather than the richness of the economy in which human beings live, which is only a part of it.

337

Poverty is the deprivation of opportunity.

267

Empowering women is key to building a future we want

232

Starvation is the characteristic of some people not having enough food to eat.

It is not the characteristic of there being not enough food to eat.

194

Progress is more plausibly judged by the reduction of deprivation than by the further enrichment of the opulent

182

No famine has ever taken place in the history of the world in a functioning democracy.

172

Human ordeals thrive on ignorance. To understand a problem with clarity is already half way towards solving it.

171

Imparting education not only enlightens the receiver, but also broadens the giver - the teachers, the parents, the friends.

159

Globalization can be very unjust and unfair and unequal, but these are matters under our control. It’s not that we don’t need the market economy. We need it. But the market economy should not have priority or dominance over other institutions.

148

A society can be Pareto optimal and still perfectly disgusting.

127

Sometimes the lack of substantive freedoms relates directly to economic poverty, which robs people of the freedom to satisfy hunger; or to achieve sufficient nutrition, or to obtain remedies for treatable illnesses or the opportunity to be adequatley clothed or sheltered, or to enjoy clean water or sanitary facilities.

121

Economics, as it has emerged, can be made more productive by paying greater and more explicit attention to the ethical considerations that shape human behaviour and judgment.

108

About Amartya Sen

Quotes 142 sayings
Profession Economist
Birthday November 3, 1933

Education makes us the human beings we are.

It has major impacts on economic development, on social equity, gender equity. In all kinds of ways, our lives are transformed by education and security. Even if it had not one iota of effect [on] security, it would still remain in my judgment the biggest priority in the world.

106

we must go on fighting for basic education for all, but also emphasize the importance of the content of education. We have to make sure that sectarian schooling does not convert education into a prison, rather than being a passport to the wide world.

105

Sometimes the lack of substantive freedoms relates directly to economic poverty

85

[Globalization] has enriched the world scientifically and culturally and benefited many people economically as well.

77

Development requires major source of unfreedom: poverty as well as tyranny, poor economic opportunities as well as systematic social deprivation, neglect of public facilities as well as intolerance or overactivity of repressive states.

69

The notion of human right builds on our shared humanity.

These rights are not derived from the citizenship of any country, or the membership of any nation, but are presumed to be claims or entitlements of every human being. They differ, therefore, from constitutionally created rights guaranteed for specific people.

57

While I am interested both in economics and in philosophy, the union of my interests in the two fields far exceeds their intersection.

47

No substantial famine has ever occurred in a democratic country - no matter how poor.

45

Violence is fomented by the imposition of singular and belligerent identities on gullible people, championed by proficient artisans of terror.

31

A defeated argument that refuses to be obliterated can remain very alive.

28

The best hope for peace in the world lies in the simple but far-reaching recognition that we all have many different associations and affiliations, and we need not see ourselves as being rigidly divided by a single categorization of hardened groups, which confront each other.

27

But once we recognize that many ideas that are taken to be quintessentially Western have also flourished in other civilizations, we also see that these ideas are not as culture-specific as is sometimes claimed. We need not begin with pessimism, at least on this ground, about the prospects of reasoned humanism in the world.

25

Globalization is a complex issue, partly because economic globalization is only one part of it. Globalization is greater global closeness, and that is cultural, social, political, as well as economic.

24

Gender inequality is not one problem, it's a collection of problems.

24

There’s a clear and strong connection between fertility reduction and women’s literacy and empowerment, including women’s gainful employment. If you look at the more than 300 districts of India, the strongest influences in explaining fertility variations are women’s literacy and gainful economic employment.

23

You have to be interested in inequality.

The issue of inequality and that of poverty are not separable.

22

It is also very engaging - and a delight - to go back to Bangladesh as often as I can, which is not only my old home, but also where some of my closest friends and collaborators live and work.

21

Anything that increases the voice of young women tends therefore to reduce the fertility rate.

20

When the Nobel award came my way, it also gave me an opportunity to do something immediate and practical about my old obsessions, including literacy, basic health care and gender equity, aimed specifically at India and Bangladesh.

19

Famines occur under a colonial administration, like the British Raj in India or for that matter in Ireland, or under military dictators in one country after another, like Somalia and Ethiopia, or in one-party states like the Soviet Union and China.

19

The Arab world is also the world that produced some of the greatest improvements in mathematics and in science. Even today, when a Princeton mathematician does an algorithm, he may not remember that "algorithm" derived from the name al-Khwarizmi, who is a ninth-century Arab mathematician.

19

We might have reason to be driven! We live for a short stretch of time in a world we share with others. Virtually everything we do is dependent on others, from the arts and culture to farmers who grow the food we eat.

18

The lack of economic freedom could be a very major reason for loss of liberty, liberty of life.

16

People's identities as Indians, as Asians, or as members of the human race, seemed to give way - quite suddenly - to sectarian identification with Hindu, Muslim, or Sikh communities.

15

The exchange between different cultures can not possibly be seen as a threat, when it is friendly. But I believe that the dissatisfaction with the overall architecture often depends on the quality of leadership.

13

Unceasing change turns the wheel of life, and so reality is shown in all it's many forms. Dwell peacefully as change itself liberates all suffering sentient beings and brings them great joy.

12

Education makes human beings more articulate.

It transforms people. You can think differently about the world. It makes it possible for you to get jobs. It makes a dramatic difference. It generates a social equity that we need.

12

Your voice is much more articulate and people listen to you if you've been to school. In family decisions, not surprisingly, the biggest impact in reducing fertility is girls' education.

11

There is considerable evidence that women's education and literacy tend to reduce the mortality rates of children

9

The elimination of ignorance, of illiteracy.

.. and of needless inequalities in opportunities (is) to be seen as objectives that are valued for their own sake. They expand our freedom to lead the lives we have reason to value, and these elementary capabilities are of importance on their own

8

The opportunities, income, schools facilities, the basic income support that the government provides or any of these things .. public transport arrangements we have.. all these are part of the way our lives and freedoms are effected.

7

I attempted to see famines as broad "economic" problems (concentrating on how people can buy food, or otherwise get entitled to it), rather than in terms of the grossly undifferentiated picture of aggregate food supply for the economy as a whole.

6

I'’m generally in favor of economic globalization.

Having said that, it doesn’t always work and does not immediately work in the interest of all. There are sufferers.

4

I left Delhi, in 1971, shortly after Collective Choice and Social Welfare was published in 1970.

4

It’s very easy to capture pictures of jubilant people in the street after the nuclear bomb. But there were no pictures of morose people sitting in their kitchens and living rooms.

4

Nearly everywhere Buddhism went, there had been a higher level of literacy, even in miserable Burma, not to mention Thailand and Sri Lanka.

4

I have not had any serious non-academic job.

4
famous quotes