We can think for ourselves and we can awaken the world to a greater consciousness.

— Anne Waldman

The most courageous Anne Waldman quotes to get the best of your day

I took my vow to poetry; this is where I'm going to be. These are my people; this is my tribe. This is where I'm going to put my energy.

9

Your compassion travels beyond your own inner circle.

And then you breathe out an alternative version where you mentally and emotionally and psychologically purify the poisons. So indeed, the generative idea is in the crux of this practice and of my propensity toward poetry, which is a practice of the imagination.

8

We pride ourselves at Natrona - I mean, pride {ironically] - on developing a noncompetitive community. That's very important. The values that can come from that kind of meditative work combined with the creative work you do, combined with your activism, can come together.

7

The dichotomies, the brokenness of the culture around things like the Vietnam war, and then a lot of it has to do with war and where we put our energy and money and attention. And the military industrial complex, which dominates our whole economy. Even with the vision of democracy in other places we know the dark side.

5

A lot of my father's generation were thinking about communism and had deep liberal and progressive connections. He never admitted whether he was a card-carrying communist party member but I think its possible.

5

A lot of my life has involved with helping create cultures that have as their basis this vision of the sharing, the partaking of a certain ethos together.

4

I still had to correct Allen Ginsberg at times when he called women girls.

I'd say. Allen please, it's not politically correct.

3

Idea that all the beats are wildly liberal and progressive is ridiculous.

You have people thinking for themselves and having certain affinities because of their upbringing and who their family are, their own people who were close to them who fought in these wars and so on. It's complicated. But they had that ability to continue the conversation.

3

My older brother was involved in the folk movement.

We would gather every weekend in Washington Park. The folk songs were so important to my reality.

3

I was going to public school in the post-World War II, the grey doldrum years.

But I was in this extraordinary environment of Manhattan, of Greenwich Village, of bohemian parents.

3

My last bedside conversation in the hospital just a few weeks before Allen Ginsberg died was 'please take care of so and so. And the legacy of the Kerouac school.

3

Growing up in the fifties, having to wear a dog tag, having to take shelter in a bomb shelter. That turned me toward the road, I did not want to live in fear of that, I was gong to work somehow against what that vision was, and what that horror was. It was poetry, art, music.

3

About Anne Waldman

Quotes 105 sayings
Profession Poet
Birthday April 2, 1945

I was not ever hitchhiking alone. I've done solo train trips but I've never driven myself alone.

3

Contemporary movies just drive me crazy.

The violence and the sentimentality and the spiritual materialism and Theism and the incredible indulgence in ignorance is so claustrophobic.

3

I had parents who were attentive to what was going on politically.

There was the Greek connection, a sense of a larger world. People coming in from abroad. There was a sense of community around ideas: a discourse and an adhesiveness which is my favorite word from [Walt] Whitman.

3

My father was a frustrated writer. I think he wanted to write the great American novel.

3

How infuriating it is to be continually born to war that continues one's whole lifetime, even as one protests it - what futility. It is perhaps a more public epic in this regard, and carries a ritual vocalization.

3

Certainly the beat writers I've known who carried forward the original, you know, I'd say that came together in the 1940s and 50s. So I was inheriting in a way some of that ethos.

2

What I propose for the "life of a poet" goes against the grain of the fossil fuel monoculture. Maybe the most revolutionary act these days is not to watch television and to read a book a day at least.

2

My mother actually left American in 1929 to be part of an alternative community of bohemians around her then father-in-law who was a well-known Greek poet. This group of people were living in this semi-Luddite reality and weaving their own clothes - proto-hippies in a way- -but around an artistic vision.

2

My father shared the ethos of many of the beat writers and was a friend of Allen Ginsberg. Probably for 25 years of my father's life, He had been an itinerant piano player and so traveled the road with bands and that sort of thing.

2

No one begs you to be a poet or write a 1000-page poem.

You have to be fueled by a drive, a conviction - a need, a necessity, a vision that is so pressing that it has no other outlet but through you. That doesn't mean that you are unconscious or in trance, but there can be moments like that.

2

I grew up in New York City in Greenwich Village and had parents who were somewhat bohemian so I was always on the nonconformist side of the equation.

2

The color red is symbolic of passion and action, so this Vajrayogini, as she's called, comes with a mantra and she comes with these various weapons and accouterments that are all symbolic of the kind of activity that this principle, as it were, this psychological principle, does or activates in the world. And there's text and mantra as well.

1

It was a little harder when I first went to Egypt when I was 18 years old and being a white woman with a knapsack and in blue jeans. But again I was part of the rucksack revolution there was some grace there. You could put it that way. And confidence as well because I thought of myself as a poet. That was part of it. I was going for that, to have experiences to make the work.

1

We humans need to do better with our vast minds and alchemical powers.

Future radial poetries might be more symbiotic with the rest of consciousness.

0

Personally there is first: imagination;

second: the act of writing - and third: the act/act of vocalizing.

0

We need a world-wide Department of Peace.

0

I think anything that gets people outside [is good] - I'm a big supporter of public parks and public spaces.

0

The whole red state/blue state thing is very interesting. Watching that shift over the years.

0

As a younger person you can come in through many, many gateways.

It's like some huge Mandela. You can enter into this and get refreshed.

0

I remember being caught in this earthquake in Mexico City and having a sense of people coming before me, of being part of this lineage. I felt similarly when I went to India and South America.

0

For me there is a poesis, a poetics, around the trope of the road that is embedded within many life experiences of the people I've been close to.

0

World War II synchronizes things for a lot of people. There's a kind of wakeup call.

0

It was really hard coming to terms with the Nazi history.

Then in my twenties I was traveling to Germany. There was a lot of poetry activity and some of my first readings abroad and trying to relate with people my own age there and what they were discovering and learning had to examine in terms of their backgrounds. Then so many of my friends had family who had either perished in the holocaust or survived in the holocaust. It was very palpable.

0

As a woman I have felt encouraged and fed by and nurtured by the work of [Jack] Kerouac and others.

0

To conjure a particular knowledge you visualize an architectural structure and then you walk around and see the details that then bring back the words or the poetry or the lines of thought. Memory's going extinct because we rely on machines and copies and so on. The idea of working with structures that conjure dreams, personages, history, time, that can be contained in this way as you walk through your mind, is a challenge.

0

For me the road became a zone, in places like Saint Marks poetry Project where I worked for 12 years.

0

I'm concerned about the overuse of spectacular places.

And there's no real wilderness left and so there's a heartbreak there. You can go anywhere and be rescued through your cell phone and have some helicopter drop down.

0

Allen's [Gisberg] loyalty to his friends was extraordinary.

And as he was dying he was calling people: "What can I do for you before I die? Do you need money? What can I do?".

0

There is a pretty interesting document called 'action writing.

' Which is not all about spontaneity and first thought, best thought,' but a certain kind of attention to the smallest increments of the phonemes of language, The kind of power of connection, what he is able to do with language.

0

This will be a good time for poetry, you know, when things get darker and stranger and your very speech is being questioned and the sense of trusting that human thing.

0

I was raised with a sense of democratic vistas and egalitarianism.

0

There's a numbness in our culture to the continuing horrors of genocide.

0

What I'm after is that wakeful state through language that stays alive.

0

I have students whose fathers are voting for Sarah Palin. It's wild.

0

The beat literary movement is strong because of those very challenging and individual relationships and styles and contention and so on. So I just feel blessed by this kind of opportunity that came from it. It was a kind of seed.

0

I think for me in terms of this kind of dichotomy you have to hold the sense of negative capability in your mind - which is Keats line about being able to hold two different ideas 'without any irritable reach after fact or reason.'

0

Connection to Buddhism is strand in my life.

0