Practical life teaches us that people may differ and that both may be wrong: it also teaches us that people may differ and both be right. Anchor yourself fast in the latter faith, or the former will sweep your heart away.

— Augustus William Hare

The most restlessness Augustus William Hare quotes that are little-known but priceless

Life is the hyphen between matter and spirit.

45

It is said that Windham, when he came to the end of a speech, often found himself so perplexed by his own subtlety that he hardly knew which way he was going to give his vote. This is a good illustration of the fallaciousness of reasoning, and of the uncertainties which attend its practical application.

21

Seeking is not always the way to find.

16

The feeling is often the deeper truth, the opinion the more superficial one.

15

Curiosity is little more than another name for Hope.

10

The cross was two pieces of dead wood;

and a helpless, unresisting Man was nailed to it; yet it was mightier than the world, and triumphed, and will ever triumph over it.

10

Light, when suddenly let in, dazzles and hurts and almost blinds us: but this soon passes away, and it seems to become the only element we can exist in.

10

Few take advice, or physic, without wry faces at it.

10

People cannot go wrong, if you don't let them. They cannot go right, unless you let them.

7

Moral prejudices are the stopgaps of virtue;

and, as is the case with other stopgaps, it is often more difficult to get either out or in through them than through any other part of the fence.

6

They who disbelieve in virtue because man has never been found perfect, might as reasonably deny the sun because it is not always noon.

6

When the moon, after covering herself with darkness as in sorrow, at last throws off the garments of her widowhood, she does not at once expose herself impudently to the public gaze; but for a time remains veiled in a transparent cloud, till she gradually acquires courage to endure the looks and admiration of beholders.

6

About Augustus William Hare

Quotes 91 sayings
Profession Author
Birthday November 17, 1792

In the moment of our creation we receive the stamp of our individuality;

and much of life is spent in rubbing off or defacing the impression.

5

Some persons take reproof good-humoredly enough, unless you are so unlucky as to hit a sore place. Then they wince and writhe, and start up and knock you down for your impertinence, or wish you good morning.

5

There is as much difference between good poetry and fine verses, as between the smell of a flower-garden and of a perfumer's shop.

4

The mind is like a trunk: if well-packed, it holds almost every thing;

if ill-packed, next to nothing.

4

The praises of others may be of use in teaching us, not what we are, but what we ought to be.

4

When will talkers refrain from evil speaking? When listeners refrain from evil hearing. At present there are many so credulous of evil, they will receive suspicions and impressions against persons whom they don't know, from a person whom they do know--an authority good for nothing.

4

The effects of human wickedness are written on the page of history in characters of blood: but the impression soon fades away; so more blood must be shed to renew it.

3

Nature is mighty. Art is mighty. Artifice is weak. For nature is the work of a mightier power than man. Art is the work of man under the guidance and inspiration of a mightier power. Artifice is the work of mere man, in the imbecility of his mimic understanding.

3

Leaves are light, and useless, and idle, and wavering, and changeable;

they even dance; and yet God in his wisdom has made them a part of oaks. And in so doing he has given us a lesson, not to deny the stout-heartedness within because we see the lightsomeness without.

3

What a type of happy family is the family of the Sun! With what order, with what harmony, with what blessed peace, do his children the planets move around him, shining with light which they drink in from their parent's in at once upon him and on one another!

3

Temporary madness may be necessary in some cases, to cleanse and renovate the mind; just as a fit of illness is to carry off the humours of the body.

3

The most mischievous liars are those who keep sliding on the verge of truth.

3

True modesty does not consist in an ignorance of our merits, but in a due estimate of them.

3

A lawyer's brief will be brief, before a freethinker thinks freely.

3

Forms and regularity of proceeding, if they are not justice, partake much of the nature of justice, which, in its highest sense, is the spirit of distributive order.

3

It is well for us that we are born babies in intellect.

Could we understand half what mothers say and do to their infants, we should be filled with a conceit of our own importance, which would render us insupportable through life. Happy the boy whose mother is tired of talking nonsense to him before he is old enough to know the sense of it.

3

I suspect we have internal senses. The mind's eye since Shakespeare's time has been proverbial; and we have also a mind's ear. To say nothing of dreams, one certainly can listen to one's own thoughts, and hear them, or believe that one hears them: the strongest argument adducible in favour of our hearing any thing.

3

Poetry is to philosophy what the Sabbath is to the rest of the week.

3

I bid you conquer in your warfare against your four great enemies, the world, the devil, the flesh, and above all, that obstinate and perverse self-will, unaided by which the other three would be comparatively powerless.

3

Many actions, like the Rhone, have two sources,--one pure, the other impure.

3

Some men so dislike the dust kicked up by the generation they belong to, that, being unable to pass, they lag behind it.

3

Just, harmonious, temperate as is the spirit of liberty, there is in the name and mere notion of it a vagueness so opposite to the definite clearness of the moral law.

3

There is a glare about worldly success which is very apt to dazzle men's eyes.

3

We look to our last sickness for repentance, unmindful that it is during a recovery men repent, not during a sickness.

3

To know the hight [sic] of a mountain, one must climb it.

3

I like the smell of a dunged field, and the tumult of a popular election.

3

Books, as Dryden has aptly termed them, are spectacles to read nature.

Aeschylus and Aristotle, Shakespeare and Bacon, are priests who preach and expound the mysteries of man and the universe. They teach us to understand and feel what we see, to decipher and syllable the hieroglyphics of the senses.

3

Who is fit to govern others? He who governs himself. You might as well have said: nobody.

2

Every wise man lives in an observatory.

2

We like slipping, but not falling; our real anxiety is to be tempted enough.

2

How deeply rooted must unbelief be in our hearts when we are surprised to find our prayers answered.

2

Excessive indulgence to others, especially to children is in fact only self-indulgence under an alias.

2

Life may be defined to be the power of self-augmentation or assimilation, not of self-nurture; for then a steam-engine over a coal-pit might be made to live.

1

Science sees signs; Poetry, the thing signified. Co-author with his brother Julius Hare.

0

In a mist the heights can for the most part see each other; but the valleys cannot.

0

In science its main worth is temporary, as a stepping-stone to something beyond.

Even [Newton's] Principia ... is truly but the beginning of a natural philosophy. Co-author with his brother Julius Hare.

0

It is natural that affluence should be followed by influence.

0
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