Best quotes by the French Philosopher Blaise Pascal

Kind words do not cost much. Yet they accomplish much.
  • Kindness

I have discovered that all human evil comes from this, man's being unable to sit still and quiet in a room alone.
  • Evil

I maintain that, if everyone knew what others said about him, there would not be four friends in the world.
  • Gossip

People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found out by others.
  • Persuasion



Jesus is the God whom we can approach without pride and before whom we can humble ourselves without despair.
  • Christianity

Two things control men's nature, instinct and experience.
  • Experience

We must learn our limits. We are all something but none of us are everything.
  • Potential

Evil is easy, and has infinite forms.
  • Evil

In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don't.
  • Faith

It is not good to be too free. It is not good to have everything one wants.
  • Freedom

Men never do evil so fully and cheerfully as when we do it out of conscience.
  • Conscience

Do you wish people to think well of you? Don't speak well of yourself.
  • Speeches

Beauty is a harmonious relation between something in our nature and the quality of the object which delights us.
  • Beauty

The struggle alone pleases us, not the victory.
  • Effort

The war existing between the senses and reason.
  • Conflict

To have no time for philosophy is to be a true philosopher.
  • Philosophy

Man's greatness lies in his power of thought.
  • Thought

Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor the lack of contradiction a sign of truth.
  • Contradiction

I have made this letter longer, because I have not had the time to make it shorter.
  • Letters

To go beyond the bounds of moderation is to outrage humanity.
  • Moderation

The sensitivity of men to small matters, and their indifference to great ones, indicates a strange inversion.
  • ones

Our soul is cast into a body, where it finds number, time, dimension. Thereupon it reasons, and calls this nature necessity, and can believe nothing else.
  • believe

The present letter is a very long one, simply because I had no leisure to make it shorter.

Habit is the second nature which destroys the first.
  • Habits

The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing: we know this in countless ways.
  • Heart

Law, without force, is impotent.
  • Law

The least movement is of importance to all nature. The entire ocean is affected by a pebble.
  • Leadership

We never live, but we hope to live; and as we are always arranging to be happy, it must be that we never are so.
  • Life

We only consult the ear because the heart is wanting.
  • Listening

When we are in love we seem to ourselves quite different from what we were before.
  • Love


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Blaise Pascal heart quotes

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The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing: we know this in countless ways.
  • Heart

We know the truth, not only by the reason, but also by the heart.
  • heart

Men often take their imagination for their heart; and they believe they are converted as soon as they think of being converted.
  • being

The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing.
  • valentines

There are two kinds of people one can call reasonable: those who serve God with all their heart because they know him, and those who seek him with all their heart because they do not know him.
  • god

The heart has its reasons which reason knows not.
  • heart

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Blaise Pascal reason quotes

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We know the truth, not only by the reason, but also by the heart.
  • heart

Reason commands us far more imperiously than a master; for in disobeying the one we are unfortunate, and in disobeying the other we are fools.
  • commands

The last proceeding of reason is to recognize that there is an infinity of things which are beyond it. There is nothing so conformable to reason as this disavowal of reason.
  • beyond

The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing.
  • valentines

Love has reasons which reason cannot understand.
  • love

The heart has its reasons which reason knows not.
  • heart

All of our reasoning ends in surrender to feeling.
  • reasoning

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Blaise Pascal reasons quotes

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Our soul is cast into a body, where it finds number, time, dimension. Thereupon it reasons, and calls this nature necessity, and can believe nothing else.
  • believe

The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing.
  • valentines

Thus so wretched is man that he would weary even without any cause for weariness... and so frivolous is he that, though full of a thousand reasons for weariness, the least thing, such as playing billiards or hitting a ball, is sufficient enough to amuse him.
  • sports

People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others.
  • convinced

Love has reasons which reason cannot understand.
  • love

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Blaise Pascal evil quotes

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I have discovered that all human evil comes from this, man's being unable to sit still and quiet in a room alone.
  • Evil

Evil is easy, and has infinite forms.
  • Evil

Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction.
  • cheerfully

Truly it is an evil to be full of faults; but it is a still greater evil to be full of them and to be unwilling to recognize them, since that is to add the further fault of a voluntary illusion.
  • add

I have discovered that all human evil comes from this, man's being unable to sit still in a room.
  • being

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Blaise Pascal faith quotes

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In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don't.
  • Faith

Faith is different from proof; the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God.
  • Faith

Faith embraces many truths which seem to contradict each other.
  • Faith

Faith certainly tells us what the senses do not, but not the contrary of what they see; it is above, not against them.
  • Faith

It is the heart which perceives God and not the reason. That is what faith is: God perceived by the heart, not by the reason.
  • Faith

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More quotes by Blaise Pascal

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All man's miseries derive from not being able to sit quietly in a room alone.
  • Money

It is superstitious to put one's hopes in formalities, but arrogant to refuse to submit to them.
  • Ritual

If we examine our thoughts, we shall find them always occupied with the past and the future.
  • Thought

Chance gives rise to thoughts, and chance removes them; no art can keep or acquire them.
  • acquire



Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction.
  • cheerfully

Animals do not admire each other. A horse does not admire its companion.
  • Admiration

What a strange vanity painting is; it attracts admiration by resembling the original, we do not admire.
  • Art

The gospel to me is simply irresistible.
  • Bible

We are only falsehood, duplicity, contradiction; we both conceal and disguise ourselves from ourselves.
  • Conflict

Earnestness is enthusiasm tempered by reason.
  • Enthusiasm

The charm of fame is so great that we like every object to which it is attached, even death.
  • Fame

Ugly deeds are most estimable when hidden.
  • Goodness

If you would have people speak well of you, then do not speak well of yourself.
  • Humility

Imagination disposes of everything; it creates beauty, justice, and happiness, which is everything in this world.
  • Imagination

Between us and heaven or hell there is only life, which is the frailest thing in the world.
  • Life

To find recreation in amusement is not happiness.
  • Pleasure

The last thing one discovers in composing a work is what to put first.
  • Reading

Men despise religion. They hate it and are afraid it may be true.
  • Religion

There are only two kinds of men: the righteous who think they are sinners and the sinners who think they are righteous.
  • Sin

The immortality of the soul is a matter which is of so great consequence to us and which touches us so profoundly that we must have lost all feeling to be indifferent about it.
  • consequence

Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything.
  • anything

We know the truth, not only by the reason, but also by the heart.
  • heart

We like to be deceived.
  • DeceptionLying

Faith is different from proof; the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God.
  • Faith

If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager then without hesitation, that He exists.
  • God

If all men knew what each said of the other, there would not be four friends in the world.
  • Gossip

However vast a man's spiritual resources, he is capable of but one great passion.
  • Passion

The property of power is to protect.
  • Power

He who does not know his way to the sea should take a river for his guide.
  • Rivers

The eternal silence of these infinite spaces fills me with dread.
  • Space

Man is obviously made for thinking. Therein lies all his dignity and his merit; and his whole duty is to think as he ought.
  • Thought

Those are weaklings who know the truth and uphold it as long as it suits their purpose, and then abandon it.
  • Truth

The finite is annihilated in the presence of the infinite, and becomes a pure nothing. So our spirit before God, so our justice before divine justice.
  • annihilated

Reason commands us far more imperiously than a master; for in disobeying the one we are unfortunate, and in disobeying the other we are fools.
  • commands

The last proceeding of reason is to recognize that there is an infinity of things which are beyond it. There is nothing so conformable to reason as this disavowal of reason.
  • beyond

Continuous eloquence wearies. Grandeur must be abandoned to be appreciated. Continuity in everything is unpleasant. Cold is agreeable, that we may get warm.
  • abandoned

It is the fight alone that pleases us, not the victory.
  • alone

All men's miseries derive from not being able to sit in a quiet room alone.
  • able

Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere.
  • center

There is a God shaped vacuum in the heart of every man which cannot be filled by any created thing, but only by God, the Creator, made known through Jesus.
  • apologetics

On vanity: The nose of Cleopatra: if it had been shorter, the face of the earth would have changed.

If I had more time I would write a shorter letter.
  • Authors

The last thing we decide in writing a book is what to put first.
  • Authors

Faith embraces many truths which seem to contradict each other.
  • Faith

Even those who write against fame wish for the fame of having written well, and those who read their works desire the fame of having read them.
  • Fame

The whole visible world is only an imperceptible atom in the ample bosom of nature. No idea approaches it.
  • Ideas

The more intelligent one is, the more men of originality one finds. Ordinary people find no difference between men.
  • Innovation

Nothing is as approved as mediocrity, the majority has established it and it fixes it fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way.
  • Mediocrity

It is right that what is just should be obeyed. It is necessary that what is strongest should be obeyed.
  • Obedience

Nothing is so intolerable to man as being fully at rest, without a passion, without business, without entertainment, without care.
  • Passion

Nothing gives rest but the sincere search for truth.
  • Rest

Our nature consist in motion; complete rest is death.
  • Rest

When we see a natural style, we are astonished and charmed; for we expected to see an author, and we find a person.
  • Style

Curiosity is only vanity. Most frequently we wish not to know, but to talk. We would not take a sea voyage for the sole pleasure of seeing without hope of ever telling.
  • Vanity

Vanity is so secure in the heart of man that everyone wants to be admired : even I who write this, and you who read this.
  • Vanity

Time heals griefs and quarrels, for we change and are no longer the same persons. Neither the offender nor the offended are any more themselves.
  • change

Men often take their imagination for their heart; and they believe they are converted as soon as they think of being converted.
  • being

The weather and my mood have little connection. I have my foggy and my fine days within me; my prosperity or misfortune has little to do with the matter.
  • connection

Custom is our nature. What are our natural principles but principles of custom?
  • custom

The consciousness of the falsity of present pleasures, and the ignorance of the vanity of absent pleasures, cause inconstancy.
  • absent

Justice without force is powerless; force without justice is tyrannical.
  • force

The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing.
  • valentines

Imagination disposes of everything; it creates beauty, justice, and happiness, which are everything in this world.
  • beauty

The strength of a man's virtue should not be measured by his special exertions, but by his habitual acts.
  • acts

Il n'est pas certain que tout soit incertain. (Translation: It is not certain that everything is uncertain.)
  • paradox

I do not admire a virtue like valour when it is pushed to excess, if I do not see at the same time the excess of the opposite virtue, as one does in Epaminondas, who displayed extreme valour and extreme benevolence. For otherwise it is not an ascent, but a fall. We do not display our greatness by placing ourselves at one extremity, but rather by being at both at the same time, and filling up the whole of the space between them.

I have made this letter a rather long one, only because I didn't have the leisure to make it shorter.
  • Authors

Belief is a wise wager. Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation, that He exists.
  • Belief

If we let ourselves believe that man began with divine grace, that he forfeited this by sin, and that he can be redeemed only by divine grace through the crucified Christ, then we shall find peace of mind never granted to philosophers. He who cannot believe is cursed, for he reveals by his unbelief that God has not chosen to give him grace.
  • Belief

Man finds nothing so intolerable as to be in a state of complete rest, without passions, without occupation, without diversion, without effort. Then he feels his nullity, loneliness, inadequacy, dependence, helplessness, emptiness.
  • Boredom

The highest order of mind is accused of folly, as well as the lowest. Nothing is thoroughly approved but mediocrity. The majority has established this, and it fixes its fangs on whatever gets beyond it either way.
  • Choice

On the occasions when I have pondered over men's various activities, the dangers and worries they are exposed to at court or at war, from which so many quarrels, passions, risky, often ill-conceived actions and so on are born, I have often said that man's unhappiness springs from one thing alone, his incapacity to stay quietly in one room. A man wealthy enough for life's needs would never leave home to go to sea or beseige some fortress if he knew how to stay at home and enjoy it...
  • Contentment

The last act is bloody, however fine the rest of the play. They throw earth over your head and it is finished forever.
  • Death

Desire and force between them are responsible for all our actions; desire causes our voluntary acts, force our involuntary.
  • Desires

One must know oneself. If this does not serve to discover truth, it at least serves as a rule of life and there is nothing better.
  • Discovery

Faith certainly tells us what the senses do not, but not the contrary of what they see; it is above, not against them.
  • Faith

It is the heart which perceives God and not the reason. That is what faith is: God perceived by the heart, not by the reason.
  • Faith

Habit is a second nature that destroys the first. But what is nature? Why is habit not natural? I am very much afraid that nature itself is only a first habit, just as habit is a second nature.
  • Habits

Man is but a reed, the most feeble thing in nature; but he is a thinking reed. The entire universe need not arm itself to crush him. A vapour, a drop of water suffices to kill him. But, if the Universe were to crush him, man would still be more noble than that which killed him, because he knows that he dies and the advantage which the universe has over him; the universe knows nothing of this.
  • Mankind

What a chimera then is man. What a novelty! What a monster, what a chaos, what a contradiction, what a prodigy. Judge of all things, imbecile worm of the earth; depositary of truth, a sink of uncertainty and error: the pride and refuse of the universe.
  • Mankind

There are only three types of people; those who have found God and serve him; those who have not found God and seek him, and those who live not seeking, or finding him. The first are rational and happy; the second unhappy and rational, and the third foolish and unhappy.
  • People

We like security: we like the pope to be infallible in matters of faith, and grave doctors to be so in moral questions so that we can feel reassured.
  • Perfection

The origins of disputes between philosophers is, that one class of them have undertaken to raise man by displaying his greatness, and the other to debase him by showing his miseries.
  • Philosophy

Human beings must be known to be loved; but Divine beings must be loved to be known.
  • Religion

Vanity of science. Knowledge of physical science will not console me for ignorance of morality in time of affliction, but knowledge of morality will always console me for ignorance of physical science.
  • Science

Man is only a reed, the weakest in nature; but he is a thinking reed. There is no need for the whole universe to take up arms to crush him: a vapor, a drop of water is enough to kill him. But even if the universe were to crush him, man would still be nobler than his slayer, because he knows that he is dying and the advantage the universe has over him. The universe knows nothing of this.
  • Thought

We think very little of time present; we anticipate the future, as being too slow, and with a view to hasten it onward, we recall the past to stay it as too swiftly gone. We are so thoughtless, that we thus wander through the hours which are not here, regardless only of the moment that is actually our own.
  • Time

The multitude which is not brought to act as a unity, is confusion. That unity which has not its origin in the multitude is tyranny.
  • Unity

Any unity which doesn't have its origin in the multitudes is tyranny.
  • Unity

The last act is bloody, however pleasant all the rest of the play is: a little earth is thrown at last upon our head, and that is the end forever.
  • act

If we must not act save on a certainty, we ought not to act on religion, for it is not certain. But how many things we do on an uncertainty, sea voyages, battles!
  • act

Nothing fortifies scepticism more than the fact that there are some who are not sceptics; if all were so, they would be wrong.
  • fact

As men are not able to fight against death, misery, ignorance, they have taken it into their heads, in order to be happy, not to think of them at all.
  • able

If man made himself the first object of study, he would see how incapable he is of going further. How can a part know the whole?
  • first

There are two kinds of people one can call reasonable: those who serve God with all their heart because they know him, and those who seek him with all their heart because they do not know him.
  • god

Truly it is an evil to be full of faults; but it is a still greater evil to be full of them and to be unwilling to recognize them, since that is to add the further fault of a voluntary illusion.
  • add

Concupiscence and force are the source of all our actions; concupiscence causes voluntary actions, force involuntary ones.
  • actions

Can anything be stupider than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of a river and his ruler has a quarrel with mine, though I have not quarrelled with him?
  • patriotism

Thus so wretched is man that he would weary even without any cause for weariness... and so frivolous is he that, though full of a thousand reasons for weariness, the least thing, such as playing billiards or hitting a ball, is sufficient enough to amuse him.
  • sports

If all men knew what others say of them, there would not be four friends in the world.
  • four

We view things not only from different sides, but with different eyes; we have no wish to find them alike.
  • alike

Eloquence is a painting of the thoughts.
  • eloquence

In each action we must look beyond the action at our past, present, and future state, and at others whom it affects, and see the relations of all those things. And then we shall be very cautious.
  • action

The eternal silence of these infinite spaces frightens me.
  • eternal

Small minds are concerned with the extraordinary, great minds with the ordinary.
  • intelligence

Too much and too little wine. Give him none, he cannot find truth; give him too much, the same.
  • little

People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others.
  • convinced

I have discovered that all human evil comes from this, man's being unable to sit still in a room.
  • being

We sail within a vast sphere, ever drifting in uncertainty, driven from end to end.
  • drifting

We conceal it from ourselves in vain - we must always love something. In those matters seemingly removed from love, the feeling is secretly to be found, and man cannot possibly live for a moment without it.
  • conceal

Vanity is but the surface.
  • surface

Few friendships would survive if each one knew what his friend says of him behind his back.
  • behind

Love has reasons which reason cannot understand.
  • love

The heart has arguments with which the logic of mind is not aquainted.

The heart has its reasons which reason knows not.
  • heart

All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone.
  • humour

All of our reasoning ends in surrender to feeling.
  • reasoning

The only shame is to have none.
  • shame


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Part 1
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Part 2
Blaise Pascal pictures quotes

Part 3
Blaise Pascal's Quotes About ...
Heart
Reason
Reasons
Evil
Faith
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Part 4
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