Introduction

What are the best Charles Dickens quotes? Charles Dickens quotations on life, heart, classic, law, upon are those, which make this novelist famous. Here you can read the most famous quotes by Charles Dickens sorted by user likes.

Best Charles Dickens quotes

A loving heart is the truest wisdom.

  • love

Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.

  • classic

No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.

  • Worth

We need never be ashamed of our tears.

  • crying



Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.

  • Charity

The word of a gentleman is as good as his bond; and sometimes better.

  • Gentlemen

I do not know the American gentleman, God forgive me for putting two such words together.

  • Gentlemen

Reflect on your present blessings, of which every man has many; not on your past misfortunes of which all men have some

  • Gratitude

They are so filthy and bestial that no honest man would admit one into his house for a water-closet doormat.

  • News

Lord, keep my memory green.

  • Memory

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

  • Perception

Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human nature .

  • Abstinence

Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew.

  • AlcoholAlcoholism

Electric communication will never be a substitute for the face of someone who with their soul encourages another person to be brave and true.

  • Communication

The men who learn endurance, are they who call the whole world, brother.

  • Endurance

Regrets are the natural property of gray hairs.

  • Regret

There is nothing so strong or safe in an emergency of life as the simple truth.

  • Truth

I never see any difference in boys. I only know two sorts of boys. Mealy boys and beef-faced boys.

  • Children

It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper; so cry away.

  • Crying

Great men are seldom over-scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire.

  • Fashion

Cheerfulness and contentment are great beautifiers and are famous preservers of youthful looks.

  • Happiness

God bless us every one! said Tiny Tim, the last of all.

  • quotes

With affection beaming in one eye, and calculation shining out of the other.

  • Hypocrisy

Philosophers are only men in armor after all.

  • Philosophy

The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.

  • again

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.

  • last-words

I wear the chain I forged in life....I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.

  • chain

He would make a lovely corpse.

  • Death

I feel an earnest and humble desire, and shall till I die, to increase the stock of harmless cheerfulness.

  • Happiness

There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast.

  • Hunting


Charles Dickens quotes images

What are the best Charles Dickens images quotes?


We need never be ashamed of our tears. - Charles Dickens

We need never be ashamed of our tears.


A loving heart is the truest wisdom. - Charles Dickens

A loving heart is the truest wisdom.


Champagne is one of the elegant extras in life. - Charles Dickens

Champagne is one of the elegant extras in life.


Where is Charles Dickens from? Charles Dickens is English. A recognized novelist. The following quotations and images represent the English peculiarities embed in Charles Dickens's character.

What Charles Dickens was famous for? Charles Dickens is famous novelist with many good quotes. Wise sayings can be accessed and memorized. Charles Dickens is well-known and respected in English society.

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Charles Dickens quotes about life

What are the best life quotations by Charles Dickens?

Let us be moral. Let us contemplate existence.

  • Life

Life is made of ever so many partings welded together.

  • Life

Anything for the quick life, as the man said when he took the situation at the lighthouse.

  • Life

This is a world of action, and not for moping and droning in.

  • Life

Whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do it well; whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself completely; in great aims and in small I have always thoroughly been in earnest.

  • aims

We forge the chains we wear in life.

  • wear

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Charles Dickens quotes about heart

What are the best heart quotations by Charles Dickens?

A loving heart is the truest wisdom.

  • love

I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.

  • christmas

There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart.

  • wisdom

Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.

  • hardens

To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart.

  • anything

Whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do it well; whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself completely; in great aims and in small I have always thoroughly been in earnest.

  • aims

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Charles Dickens quotes about classic

What are the best classic quotations by Charles Dickens?

Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.

  • classic

I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time.

  • classic

My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.

  • classic

Trifles make the sum of life.

  • classic

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Charles Dickens quotes about law

What are the best law quotations by Charles Dickens?

If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.

  • Law

Keep out of Chancery. It's being ground to bits in a slow mill; it's being roasted at a slow fire; it's being stung to death by single bees; it's being drowned by drops; it's going mad by grains.

  • Law

The one great principle of English law is to make business for itself.

  • business

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Charles Dickens quotes about upon

What are the best upon quotations by Charles Dickens?

A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.

  • constituted

Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many - not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

  • blessings

Do you spell it with a "V" or a "W"?' inquired the judge. 'That depends upon the taste and fancy of the speller, my Lord'.

  • depends

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More quotes by Charles Dickens

Want some more good quotations by Charles Dickens?

If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.

  • Law

Let us be moral. Let us contemplate existence.

  • Life

Life is made of ever so many partings welded together.

  • Life

There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.

  • Reading



Send forth the child and childish man together, and blush for the pride that libels our own old happy state, and gives its title to an ugly and distorted image.

  • blush

I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.

  • christmas

I never could have done what I have done without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one subject at a time.

  • concentrate

I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time.

  • classic

Its very strange, said Mr. Dick that I never can get that quite right; I never can make that perfectly clear.

  • quotes

A lady of what is commonly called an uncertain temper -- a phrase which being interpreted signifies a temper tolerably certain to make everybody more or less uncomfortable.

  • Anger

Industry is the soul of business and the keystone of prosperity.

  • Business

He had but one eye and the pocket of prejudice runs in favor of two.

  • Eyes

It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.

  • Greatness

Oh the nerves, the nerves; the mysteries of this machine called man! Oh the little that unhinges it, poor creatures that we are!

  • Mental

A day wasted on others is not wasted on one's self.

  • Time

Vices are sometimes only virtues carried to excess!

  • Virtue

There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart.

  • wisdom

Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.

  • hardens

A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.

  • constituted

There are strings in the human heart that had better not be vibrated.

  • Emotions

Many merry Christmases, friendships, great accumulation of cheerful recollections, affection on earth, and Heaven at last for all of us.

  • Friends

Anything for the quick life, as the man said when he took the situation at the lighthouse.

  • Life

It's my old girl that advises. She has the head. But I never own to it before her. Discipline must be maintained.

  • Marriage

There are only two styles of portrait painting; the serious and the smirk.

  • Portraits

It was a good thing to have a couple of thousand people all rigid and frozen together, in the palm of one's hand.

  • Praise

Here's the rule for bargains: Do other men, for they would do you. That's the true business precept.

  • Shopping

How many young men, in all previous times of unprecedented steadiness, had turned suddenly wild and wicked for the same reason, and, in an ecstasy of unrequited love, taken to wrench off door-knockers, and invert the boxes of rheumatic watchmen!

  • Unrequited

A boy's story is the best that is ever told.

  • Youth

To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart.

  • anything

Any man may be in good spirits and good temper when he's well dressed. There ain't much credit in that.

  • credit

Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, are all very good words for the lips.

  • words

No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of it to anyone else.

  • anyone

My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.

  • classic

[S]he stood for some moments gazing at the sisters, with affection beaming in one eye, and calculation shining out of the other.

  • calculation

A prison taint was on everything there. The imprisoned air, the imprisoned light, the imprisoned damps, the imprisoned men, were all deteriorated by confinement. As the captive men were faded and haggard, so the iron was rusty, the stone was slimy, the wood was rotten, the air was faint, the light was dim. Like a well, like a vault, like a tomb, the prison had no knowledge of the brightness outside; and would have kept its polluted atmosphere intact, in one of the spice islands of the Indian Ocean.

  • quotes

If the law supposes that, said Mr. Bumble, the law is a assa idiot. If thats the eye of the law, the law is a bachelor; and the worst I wish the law is that his eye may be opened by experienceby experience.

  • quotes

Father Time is not always a hard parent, and, though he tarries for none of his children, often lays his hand lightly upon those who have used him well; making them old men and women inexorably enough, but leaving their hearts and spirits young and in full vigour. With such people the grey head is but the impression of the old fellow's hand in giving them his blessing, and every wrinkle but a notch in the quiet calendar of a well-spent life.

  • Age

If its individual citizens, to a man, are to be believed, it always is depressed, and always is stagnated, and always is at an alarming crisis, and never was otherwise; though as a body, they are ready to make oath upon the Evangelists, at any hour of the day or night, that it is the most thriving and prosperous of all countries on the habitable globe.

  • America

It is a pleasant thing to reflect upon, and furnishes a complete answer to those who contend for the gradual degeneration of the human species, that every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last.

  • Baby

I am quite serious when I say that I do not believe there are, on the whole earth besides, so many intensified bores as in these United States. No man can form an adequate idea of the real meaning of the word, without coming here.

  • Boredom

Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own; and from morning to night, as from the cradle to the grave, it is but a succession of changes so gentle and easy that we can scarcely mark their progress.

  • Change

Change begets change. Nothing propagates so fast. If a man habituated to a narrow circle of cares and pleasures, out of which he seldom travels, step beyond it, though for never so brief a space, his departure from the monotonous scene on which he has been an actor of importance would seem to be the signal for instant confusion. The mine which Time has slowly dug beneath familiar objects is sprung in an instant; and what was rock before, becomes but sand and dust.

  • Change

Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine.

  • Company

I never could have done what I have done without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one subject at a time...

  • Concentration

The whole difference between construction and creation is this; that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.

  • Creativity

A person who can't pay gets another person who can't pay to guarantee that he can pay. Like a person with two wooden legs getting another person with two wooden legs to guarantee that he has got two natural legs. It don't make either of them able to do a walking-match.

  • Credit

I have known a vast quantity of nonsense talked about bad men not looking you in the face. Don't trust that conventional idea. Dishonesty will stare honesty out of countenance any day in the week, if there is anything to be got by it.

  • Crime

I believe no satirist could breathe this air. If another Juvenal or Swift could rise up among us tomorrow, he would be hunted down. If you have any knowledge of our literature, and can give me the name of any man, American born and bred, who has anatomized our follies as a people, and not as this or that party; and who has escaped the foulest and most brutal slander, the most inveterate hatred and intolerant pursuit; it will be a strange name in my ears, believe me.

  • Cynicism

Credit is a system whereby a person who can not pay gets another person who can not pay to guarantee that he can pay.

  • Debt

My other piece of advice, Copperfield, said Mr. Micawber, you know. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery. The blossom is blighted, the leaf is withered, the god of day goes down upon the dreary scene, and - and in short you are for ever floored. As I am!

  • Economics

Minerva House was a finishing establishment for young ladies, where some twenty girls of the ages from thirteen to nineteen inclusive, acquired a smattering of everything and a knowledge of nothing.

  • Education

Now, what I want is, facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!

  • Facts

Accidents will occur in the best-regulated families; and in families not regulated by that pervading influence which sanctifies while it enhances... in short, by the influence of Woman, in the lofty character of Wife, they may be expected with confidence, and must be borne with philosophy.

  • Family

. . . although a skilful flatterer is a most delightful companion, if you can keep him all to yourself, his taste becomes very doubtful when he takes to complimenting other people.

  • Flattery

The law is sic a ass - a idiot.

  • Government

Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one; stronger than magician ever spoke, or spirit ever answered to, in the strongest conjuration.

  • Home

Such is hope, heaven's own gift to struggling mortals, pervading, like some subtle essence from the skies, all things both good and bad.

  • Hope

Keep out of Chancery. It's being ground to bits in a slow mill; it's being roasted at a slow fire; it's being stung to death by single bees; it's being drowned by drops; it's going mad by grains.

  • Law

This is a world of action, and not for moping and droning in.

  • Life

I revere the memory of Mr. F. as an estimable man and most indulgent husband, only necessary to mention Asparagus and it appeared or to hint at any little delicate thing to drink and it came like magic in a pint bottle; it was not ecstasy but it was comfort.

  • Marriage

When you're a married man, Samivel, you'll understand a good many things as you don't understand now; but whether it's worth while, going through so much, to learn so little, as the charity-boy said when he got to the end of the alphabet, is a matter o taste.

  • Marriage

After musing for some minutes, the old gentleman walked, with the same meditative face, into a back anteroom opening from the yard; and there, retiring into a corner, called up before his mind's eye a vast amphitheatre of faces over which a dusky curtain had hung for many years.

  • Memory

We know, Mr. Weller -- we, who are men of the world -- that a good uniform must work its way with the women, sooner or later.

  • Military

The bright old day now dawns again; the cry runs through the land, in England there shall be dear bread -- in Ireland, sword and brand; and poverty, and ignorance, shall swell the rich and grand, so rally round the rulers with the gentle iron hand, of the fine old English Tory days; hail to the coming time!

  • Politics

To be shelterless and alone in the open country, hearing the wind moan and watching for day through the whole long weary night; to listen to the falling rain, and crouch for warmth beneath the lee of some old barn or rick, or in the hollow of a tree; are dismal things -- but not so dismal as the wandering up and down where shelter is, and beds and sleepers are by thousands; a houseless rejected creature.

  • Poverty

A man in public life expects to be sneered at -- it is the fault of his elevated situation, and not of himself.

  • Public

A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those dark, clustered houses encloses it

  • Reflection

A moment, and its glory was no more. The sun went down beneath the long dark lines of hill and cloud which piled up in the west an airy city, wall heaped on wall, and battlement on battlement; the light was all withdrawn; the shining church turned cold and dark; the stream forgot to smile; the birds were silent; and the gloom of winter dwelt on everything.

  • Sunset

Minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort, and like them, are often successfully cured by remedies in themselves very nauseous and unpalatable.

  • Wealth

Take example by your father, my boy, and be very careful of vidders all your life, specially if they've kept a public house, Sammy.

  • Widow

May not the complaint, that common people are above their station, often take its rise in the fact of uncommon people being below theirs?

  • being

Although a skillful flatterer is a most delightful companion if you have him all to yourself, his taste becomes very doubtful when he takes to complimenting other people.

  • becomes

That sort of half sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity's small change in general society.

  • accompanied

Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childhood days, recall to the old man the pleasures of his youth, and transport the traveler back to his own fireside and quiet home!

  • christmas

You don't carry in your countenance a letter of recommendation.

  • carry

The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.

  • between

Whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do it well; whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself completely; in great aims and in small I have always thoroughly been in earnest.

  • aims

Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many - not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

  • blessings

Do you spell it with a "V" or a "W"?' inquired the judge. 'That depends upon the taste and fancy of the speller, my Lord'.

  • depends

I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free.

  • ask

The first rule of business is: Do other men for they would do you.

  • business

The one great principle of English law is to make business for itself.

  • business

Regrets are the natural property of grey hairs.

  • grey

We are so very 'umble.

  • very

In the little world in which children have their existence, whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt, as injustice.

  • brings

The mother who lay in the grave, was the mother of my infancy; the little creature in her arms, was myself, as I had once been, hushed for ever on her bosom.

  • david

In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong.

  • cowardice

Give me a moment, because I like to cry for joy. It's so delicious, John dear, to cry for joy.

  • joy

A year or two younger than his eminently practical friend, Mr. Bounderby looked older; his seven or eight and forty might have had the seven or eight added to it again, without surprising anybody. He had not much hair. One might have fancied he had talked it off; and that what was left, all standing up in disorder, was in that condition from being constantly blown about by his windy boastfulness.

  • book

There is a wisdom of the head, and... there is a wisdom of the heart.

  • wisdom

Marley was dead: to begin with.

  • first

No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot.

  • mutual

Trifles make the sum of life.

  • classic

We forge the chains we wear in life.

  • wear

Family not only need to consist of merely those whom we share blood, but also for those whom we'd give blood.

  • merely

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Novelists similar to Charles Dickens

Which novelist has the best quotes? Top quotes from famous novelists like the following.


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Charles Dickens favorite topics

Charles Dickens is famous for his passion for life, heart, classic, law, upon. Check out great quotations and affirmations.


Conclusion

That were all of the 125 Charles Dickens quotes. Maybe some questions are in your head.

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When Charles Dickens was born? Charles Dickens was born on February 7, 1812.

Who is Charles Dickens? Charles Dickens biography. A prolific 19th Century author of short stories, plays, novellas, novels, fiction and non-fiction; during his lifetime Dickens became known the world over for his remarkable characters, his mastery of prose in the telling of their lives, and his depictions of the social classes, morals and values of his times. Some considered him the spokesman for the poor, for he definitely brought much awareness to their plight, the downtrodden and the have-nots. He had his share of critics, like Virginia Woolf and Henry James, but also many admirers, even into the 21st Century.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1
Introduction

Part 2
Best Charles Dickens quotes

Part 3
Charles Dickens quotes images

Part 4
Life
Heart
Classic
Law
Upon
All quotes

Part 5
Similar Novelists

Part 6
Favorite topics

Part 7
Conclusion

Quote
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