Introduction

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What are the best Emily Dickinson quotes? Emily Dickinson quotes on poetry, words, love, hope, death are the ones, which make this Poet famous. Access the best quotes from Emily Dickinson sorted by user likes.

Where is Emily Dickinson from? Emily Dickinson is American. A recognized Poet. The following quotes and images represent the American peculiarities embed in Emily Dickinson's character.

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Best Emily Dickinson quotes

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Forever is composed of nows.

  • experience


Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul -- and sings the tunes without the words -- and never stops at all.

  • Hope


Dogs are better than human beings because they know but do not tell.

  • poetry


Beauty is not caused. It is.

  • Beauty




Finite to fail, but infinite to venture.

  • Bravery


A wounded deer leaps the highest.

  • Adversity


The Brain is wider than the sky-.

  • Mind


A word is dead when it is said. Some say. I say it just, begins to live that day.

  • Words


Parting is all we know of heaven and all we need of hell.

  • Last


They might not need me; but they might. I'll let my head be just in sight; a smile as small as mine might be precisely their necessity.

  • smile


Death is a Dialogue between, the Spirit and the Dust.

  • Death


Not knowing when the dawn will come, I open every door.

  • Opportunity


I hope you love birds, too. It is economical. It saves going to Heaven.

  • Birds


Dying is a wild night and a new road.

  • Death


Fame is a fickle food upon a shifting plate.

  • Fame


There is no Frigate like a book to take us lands away nor any coursers like a page of prancing Poetry.

  • Reading


We outgrow love like other things and put it in a drawer, till it an antique fashion shows like costumes grandsires wore.

  • love


This is my letter to the world That never wrote to me

  • compassion


They say that God is everywhere, and yet we always think of Him as somewhat of a recluse.

  • God


Where thou art, that is home.

  • Home


Much Madness is divinest Sense -- to a discerning Eye -- much Sense -- the starkest Madness --

  • Madness


Of Consciousness, her awful Mate. The Soul cannot be rid -- as easy the secreting her behind the Eyes of God.

  • Thought


Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul And sings the tune without the words And never stops at all.

  • feathers


Let us go in; the fog is rising.

  • Death


To live is so starling it leaves little time for anything else.

  • Present


Truth is so rare that it is delightful to tell it.

  • Truth


Tell the truth, but tell it slant.

  • Truth


Find ecstasy in life; the mere sense of living is joy enough.

  • ecstasy


Anger as soon as fed is dead; 'Tis starving makes it fat.

  • Anger


Because I could not stop for Death -- He kindly stopped for me -- The carriage held but just ourselvesAnd immortality.

  • Death



Images quotes by Emily Dickinson

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Emily Dickinson Quotes About

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Emily Dickinson quotes about poetry

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Dogs are better than human beings because they know but do not tell.

  • poetry


PHOSPHORESCENCE. Now there's a word to lift your hat to... to find that phosphorescence, that light within, that's the genius behind poetry.

  • light


If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.

  • Poetry


Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those we have personality and emotion know what it means to want to escape from these things.

  • Poetry


If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry.

  • body


If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.

  • feel


If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry. These are the only ways I know it. Is there any other way?

  • poetry


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Emily Dickinson quotes about words

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A word is dead when it is said. Some say. I say it just, begins to live that day.

  • Words


Parting is all we know of heaven and all we need of hell.

  • Last


The fog is rising.

  • Last


PHOSPHORESCENCE. Now there's a word to lift your hat to... to find that phosphorescence, that light within, that's the genius behind poetry.

  • light


Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.

  • hope


A word is dead when it's been said, some say. I say it just begins to live that day.

  • words


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Emily Dickinson quotes about love

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We outgrow love like other things and put it in a drawer, till it an antique fashion shows like costumes grandsires wore.

  • love


For love is immortality.

  • love


Morning without you is a dwindled dawn.

  • love


I argue thee that love is life. And life hath immortality.

  • Love


I hope you love birds too. It is economical. It saves going to heaven.

  • birds


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Emily Dickinson quotes about hope

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Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul -- and sings the tunes without the words -- and never stops at all.

  • Hope


Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul And sings the tune without the words And never stops at all.

  • feathers


Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul And sings the tune without the words And never stops at all, And sweetest in the gale is heard; And sore must be the storm That could abash the little bird That kept so many warm. I've heard it in the chillest land And on the strangest sea, Yet never, in extremity, It asked a crumb of me.

  • Hope


I hope you love birds too. It is economical. It saves going to heaven.

  • birds


Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.

  • hope


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Emily Dickinson quotes about death

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Death is a Dialogue between, the Spirit and the Dust.

  • Death


Dying is a wild night and a new road.

  • Death


Let us go in; the fog is rising.

  • Death


Because I could not stop for Death -- He kindly stopped for me -- The carriage held but just ourselvesAnd immortality.

  • Death


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More quotes by Emily Dickinson

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After great pain, a formal feeling comes. The Nerves sit ceremonious, like tombs.

  • Pain


He ate and drank the precious Words, his Spirit grew robust; He knew no more that he was poor, nor that his frame was Dust.

  • Reading


I like a look of Agony, because I know it's true -- men do not sham Convulsion, nor simulate, a Throe --

  • Suffering


The soul should always stand ajar, ready to welcome the ecstatic experience.

  • ajar




Nature is a haunted house--but Art--is a house that tries to be haunted.

  • art


The abdication of belief makes the behavior small -- better an ignis fatuus than no illume at all.

  • Belief


The fog is rising.

  • Last


To fight aloud is very brave, but gallanter, I know, who charge within the bosom, the Cavalry of Woe.

  • Sadness


Success is counted sweetest by those who never succeed.

  • Success


To live is so startling it leaves little time for anything else.

  • life


How strange that nature does not knock, and yet does not intrude!

  • nature


Whenever a thing is done for the first time, it releases a little demon.

  • demon


For love is immortality.

  • love


To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee, One clover, and a bee, And revery. The revery alone will do, If bees are few.

  • nature


Morning without you is a dwindled dawn.

  • love


That it will never come again is what makes life so sweet.

  • life


Will you tell me my fault, frankly as to yourself, for I had rather wince, than die. Men do not call the surgeon to commend the bone, but to set it, Sir.

  • Authors


Assent -- and you are sane -- , demur -- you're straightway dangerous -- , and handled with a Chain -- .

  • Dissent


Drab Habitation of Whom? Tabernacle or Tomb -- or Dome of Worm -- or Porch of Gnome -- or some Elf's Catacomb?

  • Home


A Letter always seemed to me like Immortality, for is it not the Mind alone, without corporeal friend?

  • Letters


I argue thee that love is life. And life hath immortality.

  • Love


Luck is not chance, it is toil. Fortune is expensive smile is earned.

  • Luck


Faith is a fine invention when Gentleman can see -- but microscopes are prudent in an emergency

  • Science


If I can stop one heart from breakingI shall not live in vainIf I can ease on Life the AchingOr cool one painOr help one fainting RobinUnto his Nest againI shall not live in Vain.

  • Service


If I can stop one heart from breaking, I shall not live in vain.

  • breaking


People need hard times and oppression to develop psychic muscles.

  • develop


One need not be a chamber to be haunted.

  • poet


PHOSPHORESCENCE. Now there's a word to lift your hat to... to find that phosphorescence, that light within, that's the genius behind poetry.

  • light


I am going to learn to make bread tomorrow. So if you may imagine me with my sleeves rolled up, mixing flour, milk, saleratus, etc., with a deal of grace. I advise you if you dont know how to make the staff of life to learn with dispatch.

  • Bread


Surgeons must be very careful. When they take the knife!,Underneath their fine incisions, stirs the Culprit - Life!

  • Doctors


Proud of my broken heart since thou didst break it,Proud of the pain I did not feel till thee,Proud of my night since thou with moons dost slake it,Not to partake thy passion, my humility.

  • Heart


Heaven is so far of the mind that were the mind dissolved -- the site of it by architect could not again be proved.

  • Heaven


Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul And sings the tune without the words And never stops at all, And sweetest in the gale is heard; And sore must be the storm That could abash the little bird That kept so many warm. I've heard it in the chillest land And on the strangest sea, Yet never, in extremity, It asked a crumb of me.

  • Hope


His Labor is a Chant -- his Idleness -- a Tune -- oh, for a Bee's experience of Clovers, and of Noon!

  • Insects


'Tis so much joy! 'Tis so much joy! If I should fail, what poverty! And yet, as poor as I Have ventured all upon a throw; Have gained! Yes! Hesitated so this side the victory!

  • Joy


Nature, like us is sometimes caught without her diadem.

  • Nature


If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.

  • Poetry


Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion; it is not the expression of personality but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those we have personality and emotion know what it means to want to escape from these things.

  • Poetry


I dwell in PossibilityA fairer House than ProseMore numerous of WindowsSuperior--for DoorsOf Chambers as the CedarsImpregnable of EyeAnd for an Everlasting RoofThe Gambrels of the SkyOf Visitors--the fairestFor Occupation--ThisThe spreading wide my narrow HandsTo gather Paradise

  • Potential


We never know how high we are till we are called to rise; and then, if we are true to plan, our stature's touch the skies.

  • Potential


His mind of man, a secret makes I meet him with a start he carries a circumference in which I have no part.

  • Secrets


This is the Hour of Lead --Remembered, if outlived,As Freezing persons, recollect the Snow --First --Chill --then Stupor --then the letting go --.

  • Snow


How the old mountains drip with sunset,And the brake of dun!How the hemlocks are tipped in tinselBy the wizard sun!How the old steeples hand the scarlet,Till the ball is full, --Have I the lip of the flamingoThat I dare to tell?Then, how the fire ebbs like billows,Touching all the grassWith a departing, sapphire feature,As if a duchess pass!How a small dusk crawls on the villageTill the houses blot;And the odd flambeaux no men carryGlimmer on the spot!Now it is night in nest and kennel,And where was the wood,Just a dome of abyss is noddingInto solitude! --These are the visions baffled Guido;Titian never told;Domenichino dropped the pencil,Powerless to unfold.

  • Sunset


Celebrity is the chastisement of merit and the punishment of talent.

  • celebrity


Behavior is what a man does, not what he thinks, feels, or believes.

  • behavior


If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry.

  • body


A word is dead when it is said, some say. I say it just begins to live that day.

  • begins


Not knowing when the dawn will come I open every door.

  • come


Luck is not chance, it's toil; fortune's expensive smile is earned.

  • chance


I hope you love birds too. It is economical. It saves going to heaven.

  • birds


Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all.

  • hope


If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.

  • feel


If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry. These are the only ways I know it. Is there any other way?

  • poetry


A word is dead when it's been said, some say. I say it just begins to live that day.

  • words


I dwell in possibility…

  • possibility


I'm Nobody! Who are you? Are you – Nobody – too? Then there's a pair of us? Don't tell! they'd advertise – you know! How dreary – to be – Somebody! How public – like a Frog – To tell one's name – the livelong June – To an admiring Bog!

  • fame


There is no Frigate like a book To take us Lands away, Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry...

  • books



Poet similar to Emily Dickinson


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Conclusion

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When Emily Dickinson was born? Emily Dickinson was born on December 10, 1830.

Who is Emily Dickinson? Emily Dickinson biography. Emily Dickinson was an American poet who, despite the fact that less than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime, is widely considered one of the most original and influential poets of the 19th century.Dickinson was born to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence.Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime.The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation.Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends.Although most of her acquaintances were probably aware of Dickinson's writing, it was not until after her death in 1886—when Lavinia, Emily's younger sister, discovered her cache of poems—that the breadth of Dickinson's work became apparent. Her first collection of poetry was published in 1890 by personal acquaintances Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Mabel Loomis Todd, both of whom heavily edited the content. A complete and mostly unaltered collection of her poetry became available for the first time in 1955 when The Poems of Emily Dickinson was published by scholar Thomas H. Johnson. Despite unfavorable reviews and skepticism of her literary prowess during the late 19th and early 20th century, critics now consider Dickinson to be a major American poet.For more information, please see http://www.answers.com/topic/emily-di...

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1
Introduction

Part 2
Best Emily Dickinson quotes

Part 3
Emily Dickinson quotes images

Part 4
Emily Dickinson's Quotes About ...
Poetry
Words
Love
Hope
Death
All Emily Dickinson quotes

Part 5
Similar Poets

Part 6
Conclusion

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