All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them.

— Galileo Galilei

The most undeniable Galileo Galilei quotes that are glad to read

I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn't learn something from him.

388

The sun, with all those planets revolving around it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do.

365

The laws of nature are written by the hand of God in the language of mathematics.

345
Galileo Galilei quote I've loved the stars too fondly to be fe

I've loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night.

38

Knowing thyself, that is the greatest wisdom.

331

To be humane, we must ever be ready to pronounce that wise, ingenious and modest statement 'I do not know'.

302

Mathematics is the language with which God has written the universe.

280
Galileo Galilei quote We cannot teach people anything; we can

We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.

24

You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself.

254

The prohibition of science would be contrary to the Bible, which in hundreds of places teaches us how the greatness and the glory of God shine forth marvelously in all His works, and is to be read above all in the open book of the heavens.

169

Long experience has taught me this about the status of mankind with regard to matters requiring thought: the less people know and understand about them, the more positively they attempt to argue concerning them, while on the other hand to know and understand a multitude of things renders men cautious in passing judgment upon anything new.

167
Galileo Galilei quote I have loved the stars too fondly to be

I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night

21

In my studies of astronomy and philosophy I hold this opinion about the universe, that the Sun remains fixed in the centre of the circle of heavenly bodies, without changing its place; and the Earth, turning upon itself, moves round the Sun.

86

The vain presumption of understanding everything can have no other basis than never having understood anything. For anyone who had ever experienced just once the perfect understanding of one single thing, and had truly tasted how knowledge is accomplished, would recognize that of the infinity of other truths he understands nothing.

84

The greatest wisdom is to get to know oneself.

78

About Galileo Galilei

Quotes 138 sayings
Nationality Italian
Profession Scientist
Birthday October 16

In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.

77

I wish, my dear Kepler, that we could have a good laugh together at the extraordinary stupidity of the mob. What do you think of the foremost philosophers of this University? In spite of my oft-repeated efforts and invitations, they have refused, with the obstinacy of a glutted adder, to look at the planets or the Moon or my glass [telescope].

75

Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so.

64

With regard to matters requiring thought: the less people know and understand about them, the more positively they attempt to argue concerning them.

59

Holy Scripture could never lie or err...its decrees are of absolute and inviolable truth.

50

It is very pious to say and prudent to affirm that the holy Bible can never speak untruth -- whenever its true meaning is understood. But I believe nobody will deny that it is often very abstruse, and may say things which are quite different from wha.

48

It is surely harmful to souls to make it a heresy to believe what is proved.

48

The Milky Way is nothing else but a mass of innumerable stars planted together in clusters.

47

I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the Scriptures, but with experiments, and demonstrations.

45

Nature is relentless and unchangeable, and it is indifferent as to whether its hidden reasons and actions are understandable to man or not.

41

It is a beautiful and delightful sight to behold the body of the Moon.

40

Wine is sunlight, held together by water.

39

Scripture is a book about going to Heaven. It's not a book about how the heavens go.

39

The laws of Nature are written in the language of mathematics.

..the symbols are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word.

32

But let us remember that we are dealing with infinities and indivisibles both of which transcend our finite understanding, the former on account of their magnitude, the latter because of their smallness.

32

By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox.

30

Among the great men who have philosophized about [the action of the tides], the one who surprised me most is Kepler. He was a person of independent genius, [but he] became interested in the action of the moon on the water, and in other occult phenomena, and similar childishness.

29

Philosophy itself cannot but benefit from our disputes, for if our conceptions prove true, new achievements will be made; if false, their refutation will further confirm the original doctrines.

27

I therefore concluded, and decided unhesitatingly, that there are three stars in the heavens moving about Jupiter, as Venus and Mercury about the Sun; which at length was established as clear as daylight by numerous other observations.

24

The number of people that can reason well is much smaller than those that can reason badly. If reasoning were like hauling rocks, then several reasoners might be better than one. But reasoning isn't like hauling rocks, it's like, it's like racing, where a single, galloping Barbary steed easily outruns a hundred wagon-pulling horses.

23

Being infinitely amazed, so do I give thanks to God, Who has been pleased to make me the first observer of marvelous things, unrevealed to bygone ages.

22

But some, besides allegiance to their original error, possess I know not what fanciful interest in remaining hostile not so much toward the things in question as toward their discoverer.

21

Nature . . . is inexorable and immutable; she never transgresses the laws imposed upon her, nor cares a whit whether her abstruse reasons and methods of operations are understandable to men.

21

Showing a greater fondness for their own opinions than for truth, they sought to deny and disprove the new things which, if they had cared to look for themselves, their own senses would have demonstrated to them.

19

It vexes me when they would constrain science by the authority of the Scriptures, and yet do not consider themselves bound to answer reason and experiment.

18

The doctrine that the earth is neither the center of the universe nor immovable, but moves even with a daily rotation, is absurd, and both philosophically and theologically false, and at the least an error of faith.

14

Nature's great book is written in mathematics.

14

I am inclined to think that the authority of Holy Scripture is intended to convince men of those truths which are necessary for their salvation, which, being far above man's understanding, can not be made credible by any learning, or any other means than revelation by the Holy Spirit.

13

Doubt is the father of invention.

12

I, Galileo, son of the late Vicenzo Galilei, swear that I never said that the prime numbers are useless. What I said was that you cannot count lunar craters by counting 2, 3, 5, 7.

10

The difficulties in the study of the infinite arise because we attempt, with our finite minds, to discuss the infinite, assigning to it those properties which we give to the finite and limited; but this...is wrong, for we cannot speak of infinite quantities as being the one greater or less than or equal to another.

10

To command their professors of astronomy to refute their own observations is to command them not to see what they do see and not to understand what they do understand.

9

I abjure with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I curse and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally all and every error and sect contrary to the Holy Catholic Church.

8

The surface of the Moon is not smooth, uniform, and precisely spherical as a great number of philosophers believe it to be, but is uneven, rough, and full of cavities and prominences, being not unlike the face of the Earth, relieved by chains of mountains and deep valleys.

8

Facts which at first seem improbable will, even on scant explanation, drop the cloak which has hidden them and stand forth in naked and simple beauty.

8

The intention of the Holy Ghost is to teach us how one goes to heaven, not how heaven goes.

8

I am certainly interested in a tribunal in which, for having used my reason, I was deemed little less than a heretic. Who knows but men will reduce me from the profession of a philosopher to that of historian of the Inquisition!

7
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