Real love is the love that sometimes arises after sensual pleasure: if it does, it is immortal; the other kind inevitably goes stale, for it lies in mere fantasy.

— Giacomo Casanova

The most successful Giacomo Casanova quotes that will transform you to a better person

one who makes no mistakes makes nothing

84

Be the flame, not the moth.

81

As for myself, I always willingly acknowledge my own self as the principal cause of every good and of every evil which may befall me; therefore, I have always found myself capable of being my own pupil, and ready to love my teacher.

68

Beauty without wit offers nothing but the enjoyment of its material charms, whilst witty ugliness captivates by the charms of the mind, and at last fulfils all the desires of the man it has captivated.

62

Happy are those lovers who, when their senses require rest, can fall back upon the intellectual enjoyments afforded by the mind! Sweet sleep then comes, and lasts until the body has recovered its general harmony. On awaking, the senses are again active and always ready to resume their action.

57

Nobody can deprive me of the fact that I had a good time.

57

Love is a great poet, its resources are inexhaustible, but if the end it has in view is not obtained, it feels weary and remains silent.

53

I have always had such sincere love for truth, that I have often begun by telling stories for the purpose of getting truth to enter the heads of those who could not appreciate its charms.

51

There is no honest woman with an uncorrupted heart whom a man is not sure of conquering by dint of gratitude. It is one of the surest and shortest means.

47

[Matrimony] is the grave of love.

35

The pleasure I gave my lovers was a four fifth of the pleasure I experienced.

33

Hope is nothing but a deceitful flatterer accepted by reason only because it is often in need of palliatives.

29

About Giacomo Casanova

Quotes 100 sayings
Nationality Italian
Profession Celebrity
Birthday October 16

I have always loved truth so passionately that I have often resorted to lying as a way of introducing it into the minds which were ignorant of its charms.

29

The man who seeks to educate himself must first read and then travel in order to correct what he has learned.

26

I will begin with this confession: whatever I have done in the course of my life, whether it be good or evil, has been done freely; I am a free agent.

25

I have had friends who have acted kindly towards me, and it has been my good fortune to have it in my power to give them substantial proofs of my gratitude.

24

A man who makes known his love by words is a fool.

24

In fact, to gull a fool seems to me an exploit worthy of a witty man.

23

The raging fire which urged us on was scorching us;

it would have burned us had we failed to restrain it.

15

Man is free, but his freedom ceases when he has no faith in it;

and the greater power he ascribes to faith, the more he deprives himself of that power which God has given to him when He endowed him with the gift of reason.

14

As to the deceit perpetrated upon women, let it pass, for, when love is in the way, men and women as a general rule dupe each other.

14

The history of my life must begin by the earliest circumstance which my memory can evoke; it will therefore commence when I had attained the age of eight years and four months.

13

The man who forgets does not forgive, he only loses the remembrance;

forgiveness is the offspring of a noble heart, of a generous mind, whilst forgetfulness is only the result of a weak memory, or of an easy carelessness.

13

I have felt in my very blood, ever since I was born, a most unconquerable hatred towards the whole tribe of fools, and it arises from the fact that I feel myself a blockhead whenever I am in their company.

13

I leave to others the decision as to the good or evil tendencies of my character, but such as it is it shines upon my countenance, and there it can easily be detected by any physiognomist.

12

Man is a free agent; but he is not free if he does not believe it.

12

I learned very early that our health is always impaired by some excess either of food or abstinence, and I never had any physician except myself.

12

If you want to make people laugh, your face must remain serious.

11

It is only necessary to have courage, for strength without self-confidence is useless.

9

I know that I have lived because I have felt, and, feeling giving me the knowledge of my existence.

9

In the mean time I worship God, laying every wrong action under an interdict which I endeavour to respect, and I loathe the wicked without doing them any injury.

9

I have often met with happiness after some imprudent step which ought to have brought ruin upon me, and although passing a vote of censure upon myself I would thank God for his mercy.

8

The thing is to dazzle

8

If I had married a woman intelligent enough to guide me, to rule me without my feeling that I was ruled, I should have taken good care of my money, I should have had children, and I should not be, as now I am, alone in the world and possessing nothing.

8

From that moment our love became sad, and sadness is a disease which gives the death-blow to affection.

7

The spirit of rebellion is present in every great city, and the great task of wise government is to keep it dormant, for if it wakes it is a torrent which no dam can hold back.

7

Thence, I suppose, my natural disposition to make fresh acquaintances, and to break with them so readily, although always for a good reason, and never through mere fickleness.

7

My success and my misfortunes, the bright and the dark days I have gone through, everything has proved to me that in this world, either physical or moral, good comes out of evil just as well as evil comes out of good.

6

The mind of a human being is formed only of comparisons made in order to examine analogies, and therefore cannot precede the existence of memory.

6

I have met with some of them - very honest fellows, who, with all their stupidity, had a kind of intelligence and an upright good sense, which cannot be the characteristics of fools.

6

To lead a blameless life you must curb your passions , and whatever misfortune may befall you cannot be ascribed by anyone to want of good luck, or attributed to fate; these words are devoid of sense, and all fault will rightly fall on your own head.

6

For my future I have no concern, and as a true philosopher, I never would have any, for I know not what it may be: as a Christian, on the other hand, faith must believe without discussion, and the stronger it is, the more it keeps silent.

5

I found that the writer who says SUBLATA LUCERNA NULLUM DISCRIMEN INTER MULIERES ('when the lamp is taken away, all women are alike') says true; but without love, this great business is a vile thing.

5

When a sonnet is mediocre it is bad, for it should be sublime.

5

My errors will point to thinking men the various roads, and will teach them the great art of treading on the brink of the precipice without falling into it.

5

Since, though I do not repent my amorous exploits, I am far from wanting my example to contribute to the corruption of the fair sex, which deserves our homage for so many reasons, I hope that my observations will foster prudence in fathers and mothers and thus at least deserve their esteem.

5

I always made my food congenial to my constitution, and my health was always excellent.

4

Heart and head are the constituent parts of character;

temperament has almost nothing to do with it, and, therefore, character is dependent upon education, and is susceptible of being corrected and improved.

4

I am bound to add that the excess in too little has ever proved in me more dangerous than the excess in too much; the last may cause indigestion, but the first causes death.

4
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