In dark ages people are best guided by religion, as in a pitch-black night a blind man is the best guide; he knows the roads and paths better than a man who can see. When daylight comes, however, it is foolish to use blind, old men as guides.

— Heinrich Heine

The most satisfaction Heinrich Heine quotes that are proven to give you inner joy

If you wish to strive for peace of soul and pleasure, then believe.

66

Wherever they burn books they will also, in the end, burn human beings.

56

It must require an inordinate share of vanity and presumption, too, after enjoying so much that is good and beautiful on earth, to ask the Lord for immortality in addition to it all.

51

The beauteous dragonfly's dancing By the waves of the rivulet glancing;

She dances here and she dances there, The glimmering, glittering flutterer fair. Full many a beetle with loud applause Admires her dress of azure gauze, Admires her body's bright splendour, And also her figure so slender...

49

Every man, either to his terror or consolation, has some sense of religion.

48

The deepest truth blooms only from the deepest love.

48

There are more fools in the world than there are people.

47

Experience is a good school, but the fees are high.

47

The swan, like the soul of the poet, By the dull world is ill understood.

39

Like a great poet, Nature produces the greatest results with the simplest means.

These are simply a sun, trees, flowers, water and love.

38

Experience is a good school. But the fees are high.

37

The stones here speak to me, and I know their mute language.

Also, they seem deeply to feel what I think. So a broken column of the old Roman times, an old tower of Lombardy, a weather- beaten Gothic piece of a pillar understands me well. But I am a ruin myself, wandering among ruins.

35

About Heinrich Heine

Quotes 222 sayings
Nationality German
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

The gazelles so gentle and clever Skip lightly in frolicsome mood.

32

Woman is at once apple and serpent.

30

You cannot feed the hungry on statistics.

27

We should forgive our enemies, but not before they are hanged

26

Mark this well, you proud men of action! you are, after all, nothing but unconscious instruments of the men of thought.

26

Ask me not what I have, but what I am.

25

My heart resembles the ocean; has storm, and ebb and flow; and many a beautiful pearl lies hid in its depths below.

20

Be entirely tolerant or not at all; follow the good path or the evil one. To stand at the crossroads requires more strength than you possess.

20

If the Romans had been obliged to learn Latin, they would never have found time to conquer the world.

19

Perfumes are the feelings of flowers.

18

A brainiac notices everything, an ignoramus comments about everything.

18

I call'd the devil, and he came, And with wonder his form did I closely scan;

He is not ugly, and is not lame, But really a handsome and charming man. A man in the prime of life is the devil, Obliging, a man of the world, and civil; A diplomatist too, well skill'd in debate, He talks quite glibly of church and state.

18

Poverty sits by the cradle of all our great men and rocks all of them to manhood.

17

I bequeath all my property to my wife on the condition that she remarry immediately. Then there will be at least one man to regret my death.

16

Newness hath an evanescent beauty.

16

As the moon's fair image quaketh In the raging waves of ocean, Whilst she, in the vault of heaven, Moves with silent peaceful motion.

14

The arrow belongs not to the archer when it has once left the bow;

the word no longer belongs to the speaker when it has once passed his lips, especially when it has been multiplied by the press.

14

God will pardon me. It is His trade.

13

When the heroes go off the stage, the clowns come on.

13

Whenever books are burned men also in the end are burned.

13

God will forgive me. It's his job.

12

Whether a revolutions succeeds or fails people of great hearts will always be sacrificed to it.

11

True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and nothing but what is necessary.

11

Sweet May hath come to love us, Flowers, trees, their blossoms don;

And through the blue heavens above us The very clouds move on.

11

Ordinarily he was insane, but he had lucid moments when he was merely stupid

10

Pretty women without religion are like flowers without perfume.

10

Great genius takes shape by contact with another great genius, but, less by assimilation than by fiction.

9

Whatever tears one may shed, in the end one always blows one's nose.

9

Sleep is lovely, death is better still, not to have been born is of course the miracle.

9

In blissful dream, in silent night, There came to me, with magic might, With magic might, my own sweet love, Into my little room above.

9

On the waves of the brook she dances by, The light, the lovely dragon-fly;

She dances here, she dances there, The shimmering, glimmering flutterer fair. And many a foolish young beetle's impressed By the blue gauze gown in which she is dressed; They admire the enamel that decks her bright, And her elegant waist so slim and slight.

9

Wild, dark times are rumbling toward us, and the prophet who wishes to write a new apocalypse will have to invent entirely new beasts, and beasts so terrible that the ancient animal symbols of St. John will seem like cooing doves and cupids in comparison.

9

And over the pond are sailing Two swans all white as snow;

Sweet voices mysteriously wailing Pierce through me as onward they go. They sail along, and a ringing Sweet melody rises on high; And when the swans begin singing, They presently must die.

9

A pine tree standeth lonely In the North on an upland bare;

It standeth whitely shrouded With snow, and sleepeth there. It dreameth of a Palm tree Which far in the East alone, In the mournful silence standeth On its ridge of burning stone.

8

The sea appears all golden. Beneath the sun-lit sky.

8

And the dancing has begun now, And the Dancings whirl round gaily In the waltz's giddy mazes, And the ground beneath them trembles.

7

Our souls must become expanded by the contemplation of Nature's grandeur, before we can fully comprehend the greatness of man.

7
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