For Satan always finds some mischief still for idle hands to do.

— Isaac Watts

The most eye-opening Isaac Watts quotes that are simple and will have a huge impact on you

The eyes of a man in the jaundice make yellow observations on everything;

and the soul tinctured with any passion diffuses a false color over the appearance of things.

75

Poesy and oratory omit things not essential, and insert little beautiful digressions, in order to place everything in the most effective light.

64

If I could reach from pole to pole or grasp the ocean with a span, I would be measured by the soul The mind's the standard of the Man.

37
Isaac Watts quote Learning to trust is one of life's most

Learning to trust is one of life's most difficult tasks.

23

Speak softly. It is far better to rule by love than fear.Speak softly. Let no harsh words mar the good we may do here.

37

When I survey the wondrous cross On which the Prince of Glory died, My richest gain I count but loss, And pour contempt on all my pride.

30

To be angry about trifles is mean and childish;

to rage and be furious is brutish; and to maintain perpetual wrath is akin to the practice and temper of devils; but to prevent and suppress rising resentment is wise and glorious, is manly and divine.

25

Learning to trust is one of life's most difficult tasks.

24

Our God, our help in ages past,Our hope for years to come,Our shelter from the stormy blast,And our eternal home.

23

Love is amazing, so divine, demands my soul, my life, my all.

23

Tell of his wondrous faithfulness, And sound his power abroad;

Sing the sweet promise of his grace, And the performing God.

21

Roses grow on thorns and honey wears a sting.

18

I would not change my native landFor rich Peru with all her gold

16

About Isaac Watts

Quotes 124 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Politician
Birthday October 16

When a false argument puts on the appearance of a true one, then it is properly called a sophism or fallacy.

15

How glad the heathens would have been, That worship idols, wood and stone, If they the book God had seen.

15

There is a land of pure delight, Where saints immortal reign;

Infinite day excludes the night, And pleasures banish pain.

12

Now shall my inward joys arise, And burst into a song;

Almighty love inspires my heart, And pleasure tunes my tongue.

12

Vice and virtue chiefly imply the relation of our actions to men in this world;

sin and holiness rather imply their relation to God and the other world.

12

Everyday is a birthday; every moment of it is new to us; we are born again, renewed for fresh work and endeavor.

12

Flies, worms, and flowers exceed me still.

10

Disputation carries away the mind from that calm and sedate temper which is so necessary to contemplate truth.

10

Acquaint yourself with your own ignorance.

9

From all who dwell below the skiesLet the Creator's praise arise;

Let the Redeemer's name be sungThrough every land, by every tongue.

9

In matters of equity between man and man, our Saviour has taught us to put my neighbor in place of myself, and myself in place of my neighbor.

9

To God the Father, God the Son, And God the Spirit, Three in One, Be honour, praise, and glory given By all on earth, and all in heaven.

9

Prayer is a sacred and appointed means to obtain all the blessings that we want, whether they relate to this life or the life to come.

8

A dogmatical spirit inclines a man to be censorious of his neighbors.

Every one of his opinions appears to him written, as it were, with sunbeams, and he grows angry that his neighbors do not see it in the same light. He is tempted to disdain his correspondents as men of low and dark understandings because they do not believe what he does.

8

Abandon the secret chamber and the spiritual life will decay.

8

I would not change my blest estate for all the world calls good or great.

8

Once a day, especially in the early years of life and study, call yourselves to an account what new ideas, what new proposition or truth you have gained, what further confirmation of known truths, and what advances you have made in any part of knowledge.

7

Let dogs delight to bark and bite, for God hath made them so.

7

In works of labour or of skillI would be busy too:For Satan finds some mischief stillFor idle hands to do.

7

The stars, that in their courses roll, Have much instruction given;

But Thy good Word informs my soul How I may climb to Heaven.

6

The tulip and the butterfly Appear in gayer coats than I: Let me be dressed fine as I will, Flies, worms, and flowers exceed me still.

6

Do not be deceived; happiness and enjoyment do not lie in wicked ways.

6

There's not a plant or flower below but makes Thy glories known, And clouds arise, and tempests blow by order from Thy throne; While all that borrows life from Thee is ever in Thy care; And everywhere that we can be, Thou, God art present there.

6

How doth the little busy bee Improve each shining hour, And gather honey all the day From every opening flower!

6

It is not to be expected that we should love God supremely if we have not known him to be more desirable than all other things.

6

Not all the blood of beasts On Jewish altars slain, Could give the guilty conscience peace, Or wash away the stain: But Christ, the heav'nly Lamb, Takes all our sins away, A sacrifice of nobler nam' And richer blood than they.

4

Do not hover always on the surface of things, nor take up suddenly, with mere appearances; but penetrate into the depth of matters, as far as your time and circumstances allow, especially in those things which relate to your profession.

4

A hermit who has been shut up in his cell in a college has contracted a sort of mould and rust upon his soul.

4

To prevent and suppress rising resentment is wise and glorious, is manly and divine.

4

Earth, thou great footstool of our God, who reigns on high;

thou fruitful source of all our raiment, life, and food; our house, our parent, and our nurse.

3

The Fondness we have for Self, and the Relation which other Persons and Things have to ourselves, furnish us with another long Rank of Prejudices.

3

Lord, I ascribe it to thy grace,And not to chance as others do,That I was born of Christian race,And not a Heathen, or a Jew.

3

It was a saying of the ancients, "Truth lies in a well;

" and to carry on this metaphor, we may justly say that logic does supply us with steps, whereby we may go down to reach the water.

3

When general observations are drawn from so many particulars as to become certain and indisputable, these are jewels of knowledge.

3

Learn good-humor, never to oppose without just reason; abate some degree of pride and moroseness.

3

Our life contains a thousand springs, And dies if one be gone.

Strange! that a harp of thousand strings Should keep in tune so long.

3

Ten thousand things there are which we believe merely upon the authority or credit of those who have spoken or written them.

3
famous quotes