Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes, playing a poor hand well.

— Jack London

The most dreamy Jack London quotes that are little-known but priceless

You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.

127

Show me a man with a tattoo and I'll show you a man with an interesting past.

78

The proper function of man is to live, not to exist.

I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.

72
Jack London quote A bone to the dog is not charity. Charit

A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.

4

The most beautiful stories always start with wreckage.

70

A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.

63

Love cannot in its very nature be peaceful or content.

It is a restlessness, an unsatisfaction. I can grant a lasting love just as I can grant a lasting unsatisfaction; but the lasting love cannot be coupled with possession, for love is pain and desire and possession is easement and fulfilment.

47

There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive.

38

I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.

36

I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.

35

Mercy did not exist in the primordial life.

It was misunderstood for fear, and such misunderstandings made for death.

23

The grapes on a score of rolling hills are red with autumn flame.

Across Sonoma Mountain wisps of sea fog are stealing. The afternoon sun smoulders in the drowsy sky. I have everything to make me glad I am alive. I am filled with dreams and mysteries. I am all sun and air and sparkle. I am vitalized, organic.

22

And how have I lived? Frankly and openly, though crudely.

I have not been afraid of life. I have not shrunk from it. I have taken it for what it was at its own valuation. And I have not been ashamed of it. Just as it was, it was mine.

21

About Jack London

Quotes 161 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Novelist
Birthday January 12, 1876

The function of man is to live, not to exist.

20

I'd rather sing one wild song and burst my heart with it, than live a thousand years watching my digestion and being afraid of the wet.

18

The aim of life was meat. Life itself was meat. Life lived on life. There were the eaters and the eaten.

15

He was a killer, a thing that preyed, living on the things that lived, unaided, alone, by virtue of his own strength and prowess, surviving triumphantly in a hostile environment where only the strong survive.

15

He became quicker of movement than the other dogs, swifter of foot, craftier, deadlier, more lithe, more lean with ironlike muscle and sinew, more enduring, more cruel more ferocious, and more intelligent. He had to become all these things, else he would not have held his own nor survived the hostile environment in which he found himself.

13

The scab is a traitor to his God, his mother, and his class.

12

I am a hopeless materialist. I see the soul as nothing else than the sim of activities of the organism plus personal habits - plus inherited habits, memories, experiences, of the organism. I believe that when I am dead, I am dead. I believe that with my death I am just as much obliterated as the last mosquito you and I squashed.

11

. . . and God knows we are sensitive to the suffering that has sometimes broken loose to come billowing forth from your appendages like the pungent vapors of whales - often it appears that in this life of experience and accommodation we pay just as dearly for our triumphs as we do for our defeats. But Sissy . . . hold on!

11

Pursuit and possession are accompanied by states of consciousness so wide apart that they can never be united.

10

Life, in a sense, is living and surviving.

And all that makes for living and surviving is good. He who follows the fact cannot go astray, while he who has no reverence for the fact wanders afar.

10

The ghostly winter silence had given way to the great spring murmur of awakening life.

10

He had come to know quite thoroughly the world in which he lived.

His outlook was bleak and materialistic. The world as he saw it was a fierce and brutal world, a world without warmth, a world in which caresses and affection and the bright sweetness of spirit did not exist.

10

There is such a thing as anaesthesia of pain, engendered by pain too exquisite to be borne.

10

Everything is good . . . as long as it is unpossessed. Satiety and possession are Death's horses they run in span.

9

I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot.

9

The aim of life was meat. Life itself was meat. Life lived on life. There were the eaters and the eaten. The law was: EAT OR BE EATEN. He did not formulate the law in clear, set terms and moralize about it. He did not even think the law; he merely lived the law without thinking about it at all.

8

No; I did not hate him. The word is too weak. There is no word in the language strong enough to describe my feelings. I can say only that I knew the gnawing of a desire for vengeance on him that was a pain in itself and that exceeded all the bounds of language.

7

Where others have hearts, he carries a tumor of rotten principles.

7

He was a silent fury who no torment could tame.

7

The word is too weak. There is no word in the language strong enough to describe my feelings.

6

I did not begin when I was born, nor when I was conceived.

I have been growing, developing, through incalculable myriads of millenniums... All my previous selves have their voices, echoes, promptings in me... Oh, incalculable times again shall I be born.

6

She was thrilling to a desire that urged her to go forward, to be in closer to that fire, to be squabbling with the dogs, and to be avoiding and dodging the stumbling feet of men.

4

So that was the way. No fair play. Once down, that was the end of you.

4

His conclusion was that things were not always what they appeared to be.

The cub's fear of the unknown was an inherited distrust, and it had now been strengthened by experience. Thenceforth, in the nature of things, he would possess an abiding distrust of appearances.

3

Intelligent men are cruel. Stupid men are monstrously cruel.

3

To have a full stomach, to daze lazily in the sunshine--such things were remuneration in full for his adors and toils, while his ardors and toils were in themselves self-remunerative. They were expressions of life, and life is always happy when it is expressing itself.

3

But under it all they were men, penetrating the land of desolation and mockery and silence, puny adventurers bent on colossal adventure, pitting themselves against the might of a world as remote and alien and pulseless as the abysses of space.

3

You stand on dead men's legs. You've never had any of your own. You couldn't walk alone between two sunrises and hustle the meat for your belly

3

Love, genuine passionate love, was his for the first time.

3

Affluence means influence.

3

I am first of all a white man, and only then a socialist.

3

Ever bike? Now that's something that makes life worth living!

3

White Fang knew the law well: to oppress the weak and obey the strong.

3

It was the masterful and incommunicable wisdom of eternity laughing at the futility of life and the effort of life. It was the Wild, the savage, frozen-hearted Northland Wild. (Ch.1)

3

Out of this pack-persecution he learned two important things: how to take care of himself in a mass-fight against him; and how, on a single dog, to inflict the greatest amount of damage in the briefest space of time.

3

It was the worst hurt he had ever known.

2

But it did not all happen in a day, this giving over of himself, body and soul, to the man-animals. He could not immediately forego his wild heritage and his memories of the Wild. There were days when he crept to the edge of the forest and stood and listened to something calling him far and away.

2
famous quotes