There are few mortals so insensible that their affections cannot he gained by mildness, their confidence by sincerity, their hatred by scorn or neglect

— Johann Georg Ritter von Zimmermann

The most fascinating Johann Georg Ritter von Zimmermann quotes that are glad to read

In fame's temple there is always a niche to be found for rich dunces, importunate scoundrels, or successful butchers of the human race.

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Truth lies in a small compass! The Aristotelians say, all truth is contained in Aristotle, in one place or another. Galileo makes Simplicius say so, but shows the absurdity of that speech by answering all truth is contained in a lesser compass, namely, in the alphabet.

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Silence is the safest response for all the contradiction that arises from impertinence, vulgarity, or envy.

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Who conquers indolence conquers all other hereditary sins.

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Suicides pay the world a bad compliment.

Indeed, it may so happen that the world has been beforehand with them in incivility. Granted. Even then the retaliation is at their own expense.

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A moral lesson is better expressed in short sayings than in long discourse.

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The more you speak of yourself, the more you are likely to lie.

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In the sallies of badinage a polite fool shines;

but in gravity he is as awkward as an elephant disporting.

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Silence is a trick when it imposes. Pedants and scholars, churchmen and physicians, abound in silent pride.

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The ill usage of every minute is a new record against us in heaven.

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Be not so bigoted to any custom as to worship it at the expense of truth.

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Never lose sight of this important truth, that no one can be truly great until he has gained a knowledge of himself, a knowledge which can only be acquired by occasional retirement.

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About Johann Georg Ritter von Zimmermann

Quotes 69 sayings
Profession Writer
Birthday December 8, 1728

There appears to exist a greater desire to live long than to live well! Measure by man's desires, he cannot live long enough; measure by his good deeds, and he has not lived long enough; measure by his evil deeds, and he has lived too long.

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The weak may be joked out of anything but their weakness.

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By fools, knaves fatten; by bigots, priests are well clothed; every knave finds a gull.

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We never read without profit if with the pen or pencil in our hand we mark such ideas as strike us by their novelty, or correct those we already possess.

2

News-hunters have great leisure, with little thought;

much petty ambition to be considered intelligent, without any other pretension than being able to communicate what they have just learned.

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A good name will wear out; a bad one may be turned; a nickname lasts forever.

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Indolent people, whatever taste they may have for society, seek eagerly for pleasure, and find nothing. They have an empty head and seared hearts.

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Egotism is more like an offense, than a crime;

though it is allowable to speak of yourself, provided nothing is advanced in favor; but I cannot help suspecting that those who abuse themselves are, in reality, angling for approbation.

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Liberal of cruelty are those who pamper with promises;

promisers destroy while they deceive, and the hope they raise is dearly purchased by the dependence that is sequent to disappointment.

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The lust of dominion innovates so imperceptibly that we become complete despots before our wanton abuse of power is perceived; the tyranny first exercised in the nursery is exhibited in various shapes and degrees in every stage of our existence.

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Many species of wit are quite mechanical;

these are the favorites of witlings, whose fame in words scarce outlives the remembrance of their funeral ceremonies.

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Though fancy may be the patient's complaint, necessity is often the doctor's.

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The sluggard is a living insensible.

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Take care to be an economist in prosperity. There is no fear of your being one in adversity.

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An everlasting tranquility is, in my imagination, the highest possible felicity, because I know of no felicity on earth higher than that which a peaceful mind and contented heart afford.

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All our distinctions ire accidental; beauty and deformity, though personal qualities, are neither entitled to praise nor censure; yet it so happens that they color our opinion of those qualities to which mankind have attached responsibility.

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Nobility should be elective, not hereditary.

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Fools with bookish knowledge art children with edged weapons;

they hurt themselves, and put others in pain.

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When ill news comes too late to be serviceable to your neighbor, keep it to yourself.

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Many good qualities are not sufficient to balance a single want - the want of money.

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That happy state of mind, so rarely possessed, in which we can say, "I have enough," is the highest attainment of philosophy.

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Comedians are not usually actors, but imitations of actors.

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The man whose bosom neither riches nor luxury nor grandeur can render happy may, with a book in his hand, forget all his torments under the friendly shade of every tree; and experience pleasures as infinite as they are varied, as pure as they are lasting, as lively as they are unfading, and as compatible with every public duty as they are contributory to private happiness.

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Idlers cannot even find time to be idle, or the industrious to be at leisure.

We must always be doing or suffering

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Time is never more misspent than while we declaim against the want of it;

all our actions are then tinctured with peevishness. The yoke of life is certainly the least oppressive when we carry it with good-humor; and in the shades of rural retirement, when we have once acquired a resolution to pass our hours with economy, sorrowful lamentations on the subject of time misspent and business neglected never torture the mind.

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Economy is an excellent lure to betray people into expense.

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Unless the habit leads to happiness the best habit is to contract none.

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The purse of the patient often protracts his case.

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Surmise is the gossamer that malice blows on fair reputations, the corroding dew that destroys the choice blossom. Surmise is primarily the squint of suspicion, and suspicion is established before it is confirmed.

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Those beings only are fit for solitude who are like nobody, and are liked by nobody.

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Contempt is frequently regulated by fashion.

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The human mind, in proportion as it is deprived of external resources, sedulously labors to find within itself the means of happiness, learns to rely with confidence on its own exertions, and gains with greater certainty the power of being happy.

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The necessities that exist are in general created by the superfluities that are enjoyed.

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'We only have two things to worry about.

..... One that things will never get back to normal And two that they already have!' Open your mouth and purse cautiously, and your stock of wealth and reputation shall, at least in repute, be great.

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The love of solitude, when cultivated in the morn of life, elevates the mind to a noble independence, but to acquire the advantages which solitude is capable of affording, the mind must not be impelled to it by melancholy and discontent, but by a real distaste to the idle pleasures of the world, a rational contempt for the deceitful joys of life, and just apprehensions of being corrupted and seduced by its insinuating and destructive gayeties.

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Do not think that your Learning and Genius, your Wit or Sprightliness, are welcome everywhere. I was once told that my Company was disagreeable because I appeared so uncommonly happy.

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Leisure, the highest happiness upon earth, is seldom enjoyed with perfect satisfaction, except in solitude. Indolence and indifference do not always afford leisure; for true leisure is frequently found in that interval of relaxation which divides a painful duty from an agreeable recreation; a toilsome business from the more agreeable occupations of literature and philosophy.

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