Ignorance and inconsideration are the two great causes of the ruin of mankind.

— John Tillotson

The most perspective John Tillotson quotes that will activate your inner potential

A good word is an easy obligation; but not to speak ill requires only our silence, which costs us nothing.

31

Of all parts of wisdom the practice is the best.

10

The art of using deceit and cunning grow continually weaker and less effective to the user.

6

Sincerity is to speak as we think, to do as we pretend and profess, to perform and make good what we promise, and really to be what we would seem and appear to be.

6

Zeal is fit for wise men, but flourishes chiefly among fools.

6

Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy; but he that can moderate these affections will find ease in his mind.

5

When we have practiced good actions awhile, they become easy;

when they are easy, we take pleasure in them; when they please us, we do them frequently; and then, by frequency of act, they grow into a habit.

5

Our belief or disbelief of a thing does not alter the nature of the thing.

5

To be able to bear provocation is an argument of great reason, and to forgive it of a great mind.

5

True wisdom is a thing very extraordinary.

Happy are they that have it: and next to them, not those many that think they have it, but those few that are sensible of their own defects and imperfections, and know that they have it not.

5

Was ever any wicked man free from the stings of a guilty conscience?

4

The angriest person in a controversy is the one most liable to be in the wrong.

4

About John Tillotson

Quotes 79 sayings
Nationality British
Profession Theologian
Birthday October 16

If people would but provide for eternity with the same solicitude and real care as they do for this life, they could not fail of heaven.

4

Abstinence is many times very helpful to the end of religion.

4

Every Christian is endued with a power whereby he is enabled to resist temptations.

3

If our souls be immortal, this makes amends for the frailties of life and the sufferings of this state.

3

No man's body is as strong as his appetites, but Heaven has corrected the boundlessness of his voluptuous desires by stinting his strength and contracting his capacities.

3

There are two restraints which God has laid upon human nature, shame and fear;

shame is the weaker, and has place only in those in whom there are some reminders of virtue.

3

Sincerity is like traveling on a plain, beaten road, which commonly brings a man sooner to his journey's end than by-ways, in which men often lose themselves.

3

If the show of any thing be good for any thing, I am sure sincerity is better;

for why does any man dissemble, or seem to be that which he is not, but because he thinks it good to have such a quality as he pretends to?

3

Some things will not bear much zeal; and the more earnest we are about them, the less we recommend ourselves to the approbation of sober and considerate men.

3

Truth is always consistent with itself, and needs nothing to help it out.

It is always near at hand, and sits upon our lips, and is ready to drop out before we are aware; whereas a lie is troublesome, and sets a man's invention upon the rack; and one trick needs a great many more to make it good.

3

Though all afflictions are evils in themselves, yet they are good for us, because they discover to us our disease and tend to our cure.

3

Truth is the shortest and nearest way to our end, carrying us thither in a straight line.

3

Whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks the truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly.

3

Virtue and vice are not arbitrary things;

but there is a natural and eternal reason for goodness and virtue, and against vice and wickedness.

3

Take away God and religion, and men live to no purpose, without proposing any worthy end of life to themselves.

3

Piety and virtue are not only delightful for the present, but they leave peace and contentment behind them.

3

Is not he imprudent, who, seeing the tide making haste towards him apace, will sleep till the sea overwhelms him?

3

A little wit and a great deal of ill-nature will furnish a man for satire;

but the greatest instance of wit is to commend well.

3

Whether religion be true or false, it must be necessarily granted to be the only wise principle and safe hypothesis for a man to live and die by.

3

When a man has once forfeited the reputation of his integrity, he is set fast, and nothing will then serve his turn, neither truth nor falsehood.

3

Religion in a magistrate strengthens his authority, because it procures veneration, and gains a reputation to it. In all the affairs of this world, so much reputation is in reality so much power.

3

The covetous man heaps up riches, not to enjoy them, but to have them;

and starves himself in the midst of plenty, and most unnaturally cheats and robs himself of that which is his own; and makes a hard shift, to be as poor and miserable with a great estate, as any man can be without it.

3

He who is sincere hath the easiest task in the world, for, truth being always consistent with itself, he is put to no trouble about his words and actions; it is like traveling in a plain road, which is sure to bring you to your journey's end better than byways in which many lose themselves.

3

Of all parts of wisdom, the practice is the best.

Socrates was esteemed the wisest man of his time because he turned his acquired knowledge into morality, and aimed at goodness more than greatness.

3

Wickedness is a kind of voluntary frenzy, and a chosen distraction.

2

None so nearly disposed to scoffing at religion as those who have accustomed themselves to swear on trifling occasions.

2

The crafty person is always in danger;

and when they think they walk in the dark, all their pretenses are transparent.

2

There is no man that is knowingly wicked but is guilty to himself;

and there is no man that carries guilt about him but he receives a sting in his soul.

2

How often might a man, after he had jumbled a set of letters in a bag, fling them out upon the ground before they would fall into an exact poem, yea, or so much as make a good discourse in prose? And may not a little book be as easily made by chance as this great volume of the world?

2

Of some calamity we can have no relief but from God alone;

and what would men do, in such a case if it were not for God?

2

In all the affairs of this world, so much reputation is in reality so much power.

2

Every man hath greater assurance that God is good and just than he can have of any subtle speculations about predestination and the decrees of God.

1

The true ground of most men's prejudice against the Christian doctrine is because they have no mind to obey it.

1

Convulsive anger storms at large; or pale And silent, settles into full revenge.

0

To be happy is not only to be freed from the pains and diseases of the body, but from anxiety and vexation of spirit; not only to enjoy the pleasures of sense, but peace of conscience and tranquillity of mind.

0

Wealth and riches, that is, an estate above what sufficeth our real occasions and necessities, is in no other sense a 'blessing' than as it is an opportunity put into our hands, by the providence of God, of doing more good.

0

Fill each day with light and heart.

0
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