Imagination is to love what gas is to the balloon-that which raises it from earth.

— Letitia Elizabeth Landon

The most vibrant Letitia Elizabeth Landon quotes that will activate your desire to change

I can pass days Stretch'd in the shade of those old cedar trees, Watching the sunshine like a blessing fall,-- The breeze like music wandering o'er the boughs, Each tree a natural harp,--each different leaf A different note, blent in one vast thanksgiving.

16

I think hearts are very much like glasses.

If they do not break with the first ring, they usually last a considerable time.

15

Ah, tell me not that memory sheds gladness o'er the past, what is recalled by faded flowers, save that they did not last?

14

A blossom full of promise is life's joy, That never comes to fruit.

Hope, for a time, Suns the young floweret in its gladsome light, And it looks flourishing--a little while-- 'T is pass'd, we know not whither, but 't is gone.

12

Social life is filled with doubts and vain aspirings;

solitude, when the imagination is dethroned, is turned to weariness and ennui.

12

The heart's hushed secret in the soft dark eye.

11

Ah, tell me not that memory Sheds gladness o'er the past;

What is recalled by faded flowers, Save that they did not last? Were it not better to forget, Than but remember and regret?

10

In sad truth, half our forebodings of our neighbors are but our own wishes, which we are ashamed to utter in any other form.

10

there is nothing so easy as to be wise for others;

a species of prodigality, by-the-by - for such wisdom is wholly wasted.

8

Strange mystery of our nature, that those in whom genius develops itself in imagination, thus taking its most ethereal form, should yet be the most dependent on the opinions of others!

7

One of the greatest of all mental pleasures is to have our thoughts often divined: ever entered into with sympathy.

5

Enthusiasm is the divine particle in our composition: with it we are great, generous, and true; without it, we are little, false, and mean.

5

About Letitia Elizabeth Landon

Quotes 166 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

There is no existence so content as that whose present is engrossed by employment, and whose future is filled by some strong hope, the truth of which is never proved. Toil and illusion are the only secrets to make life tolerable.

4

How disappointment tracks the steps of hope.

4

I will look on the stars and look on thee, and read the page of thy destiny.

4

All profound truths startle you in the first announcement.

4

Strange the affection which clings to inanimate objects - objects which cannot even know our love! But it is not return that constitutes the strength of an attachment.

4

How often, in this cold and bitter world, is the warm heart thrown back upon itself! Cold, careless, are we of another's grief; we wrap ourselves in sullen selfishness.

4

Delicious tears! The heart's own dew.

3

My heart is its own grave!

3

Sneering springs out of the wish to deny;

and wretched must that state of mind be that wishes to take refuge in doubt.

3

And this is woman's fate: all her affections are called into life by winning flatteries, and then thrown back upon themselves to perish; and her heart, her trusting heart, filled with weak tenderness, is left to bleed or break!

3

I would give worlds, could I believe One-half that is profess'd me;

Affection! could I think it Thee, When Flattery has caress'd me.

3

sight-seeing gratifies us in different ways.

First, there is the pleasure of novelty; secondly, either that of admiration or fault-finding - the latter a very animated enjoyment.

3

What is life? A gulf of troubled waters, where the soul, like a vexed bark, is tossed upon the waves of pain and pleasure by the wavering breath of passions.

3

... many a heart is caught in the rebound ... Pride may be soothed by the ready devotion of another; vanity may be excited the more keenly by recent mortification.

3

Are we not like the actor of old times, who wore his mask so long his face took its likeness?

3

We would liken music to Aladdin's lamp — worthless in itself, not so for the spirits which obey its call. We love it for the buried hopes, the garnered memories, the tender feelings, it can summon with a touch.

3

The dream on the pillow, That flits with the day, The leaf of the willow A breath wears away; The dust on the blossom, The spray on the sea; Ay,--ask thine own bosom-- Are emblems of thee.

3

Hope is love's happiness, but not its life.

3

When does the mind put forth its powers? when are the stores of memory unlocked? when does wit 'flash from fluent lips?' -- when but after a good dinner? Who will deny its influence on the affections? Half our friends are born of turbots and truffles.

3

No thoroughly occupied man was ever yet very miserable.

3

Toil is the portion of day, as sleep is that of night;

but if there be one hour of the twenty-four which has the life of day without its labor, and the rest of night without its slumber, it is the lovely and languid hour of twilight.

3

he who seeks pleasure with reference to himself, not others, will ever find that pleasure is only another name for discontent.

3

We need to suffer, that we may learn to pity.

3

Hopes and regrets are the sweetest links of existence.

3

Memory has many conveniences, and, among others, that of foreseeing things as they have afterwards happened.

2

Praise is sometimes a good thing for the diffident and the despondent.

It teaches them properly to rely on the kindness of others.

2

To enjoy yourself is the easy method to give enjoyment to others.

2

Do anything but love; or if thou lovest and art a woman, hide thy love from him whom thou dost worship; never let him know how dear he is; flit like a bird before him; lead him from tree to tree, from flower to flower; but be not won, or thou wilt, like that bird, when caught and caged, be left to pine neglected and perish in forgetfulness.

2

I cannot love evergreens - they are the misanthropes of nature.

To them the spring brings no promise, the autumn no decline; they are cut off from the sweetest of all ties with their kind - sympathy. ... I will have no evergreens in my garden; when the inevitable winter comes, every beloved plant and favorite tree shall drop together - no solitary fir left to triumph over the companionship of decay.

2

All sweeping assertions are erroneous.

2

All beginnings are very troublesome things.

2

How beautiful, buoyant, and glad is morning! The first sunshine on the leaves: the first wind, laden with the first breath of the flowers—that deep sigh with which they seem to waken from sleep; the first dew, untouched even by the light foot of the early hare; the first chirping of the rousing birds, as if eager to begin song and flight; all is redolent of the strength given by rest, and the joy of conscious life.

1

Nothing is so fortunate for mankind as its diversity of opinion.

1

Whenever I hear a man talking of the advantages of our ill-used sex, I look upon it as the prelude to some new act of authority.

1

marriage is like money - seem to want it, and you never get it.

0

there can be neither politically nor morally a good which is not universal .

.. we cannot reform for a time or for a class, but for all and for the whole, and our very interests will draw us together in one wide bond of sympathy.

0

Oh, no! my heart can never be Again in lightest hopes the same;

The love that lingers there for thee Hath more of ashes than of flame.

0
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