Constant dripping hollows out a stone.

— Lucretius

The most helpful Lucretius quotes you will be delighted to read

Why shed tears that you must die? For if your past life has been one of enjoyment, and if all your pleasures have not passed through your mind, as through a sieve, and vanished, leaving not a rack behind, why then do you not, like a thankful guest, rise cheerfully from life's feast, and with a quiet mind go take your rest.

39

The drops of rain make a hole in the stone, not by violence, but by oft falling.

30

Too often in time past, religion has brought forth criminal and shameful actions... How many evils has religion caused?

27

What came from the earth returns back to the earth, and the spirit that was sent from heaven, again carried back, is received into the temple of heaven.

20

For fools admire and love those things they see hidden in verses turned all upside down, and take for truth what sweetly strokes the ears and comes with sound of phrases fine imbued.

16

It's easier to avoid the snares of love than to escape once you are in that net whose cords and knots are strong; but even so, enmeshed, entangled, you can still get out unless, poor fool, you stand in your own way.

16

From the very fountain of enchantment there arises a taste of bitterness to spread anguish amongst the flowers.

14

From the heart of the fountain of delight rises a jet of bitterness that tortures us among the very flowers.

13

The greatest wealth is to live content with little, for there is never want where the mind is satisfied.

12

Were a man to order his life by the rules of true reason, a frugal substance joined to a contented mind is for him great riches; for never is there any lack of a little.

11

To none is life given in freehold; to all on lease.

8

Fear is the mother of all gods ... Nature does all things spontaneously, by herself, without the meddling of the gods.

8

About Lucretius

Quotes 184 sayings
Nationality Roman
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

Tis pleasant to stand on shore and watch others labouring in a stormy sea.

7

The sum of all sums is eternity.

6

The fall of dropping water wears away the Stone.

6

For piety lies not in being often seen turning a veiled head to stones, nor in approaching every altar, nor in lying prostratebefore the temples of the gods, nor in sprinkling altars with the blood of beastsbut rather in being able to look upon all things with a mind at peace.

6

What is food to one man may be fierce poison to others

6

The gods and their tranquil abodes appear, which no winds disturb, nor clouds bedew with showers, nor does the white snow, hardened by frost, annoy them; the heaven, always pure, is without clouds, and smiles with pleasant light diffused.

6

Even if I knew nothing of the atoms, I would venture to assert on the evidence of the celestial phenomena themselves, supported by many other arguments, that the universe was certainly not created for us by divine power: it is so full of imperfections.

5

We, peopling the void air, make gods to whom we impute the ills we ought to bear.

5

Anything made out of destructible matter Infinite time would have devoured before. But if the atoms that make and replenish the world Have endured through the immense span of the past Their natures are immortal-that is clear. Never can things revert to nothingness!

5

The first-beginnings of things cannot be distinguished by the eye.

5

For it is unknown what is the real nature of the soul, whether it be born with the bodily frame or be infused at the moment of birth, whether it perishes along with us, when death separates the soul and body, or whether it visits the shades of Pluto and bottomless pits, or enters by divine appointment into other animals.

5

Therefore there is not anything which returns to nothing, but all things return dissolved into their elements.

5

If atom stocks are inexhaustible, Greater than power of living things to count, If Nature's same creative power were present too To throw the atoms into unions - exactly as united now, Why then confess you must That other worlds exist in other regions of the sky, And different tribes of men, kinds of wild beasts.

5

We cannot conceive of matter being formed of nothing, since things require a seed to start from.

4

The sum total of all sums total is eternal.

4

O goddess, bestow on my words an immortal charm.

4

So potent was religion in persuading to evil deeds.

4

Why dost thou not retire like a guest sated with the banquet of life, and with calm mind embrace, thou fool, a rest that knows no care?

4

In the midst of the fountain of wit there arises something bitter, which stings in the very flowers.

4

Violence and wrong enclose all who commit them in their meshes and do mostly recoil on him from whom they begin.

4

There can be no centre in infinity.

4

The dreadful fear of hell is to be driven out, which disturbs the life of man and renders it miserable, overcasting all things with the blackness of darkness, and leaving no pure, unalloyed pleasure.

4

Nature impelled men to make sounds with their tongues And they found it useful to give names to things Much for the same reason that we see children now Have recourse to gestures because they cannot speak And point their fingers at things which appear before them.

4

Long time men lay oppress'd with slavish fear Religion's tyranny did domineer .

.. At length a mighty one of Greece began To assert the natural liberty of man, By senseless terrors and vain fancies let To slavery. Straight the conquered phantoms fled.

4

It is great wealth to a soul to live frugally with a contented mind.

4

Thus the sum of things is ever being reviewed, and mortals dependent one upon another. Some nations increase, others diminish, and in a short space the generations of living creatures are changed and like runners pass on the torch of life.

3

From the midst of the very fountain of pleasure, something of bitterness arises to vex us in the flower of enjoyment.

3

Sweet it is, when on the high seas the winds are lashing the waters, to gaze from the land on another's struggles.

3

... we in the light sometimes fear what is no more to be feared than the things children in the dark hold in terror and imagine will come true.

3

The highest summits and those elevated above the level of other things are mostly blasted by envy as by a thunderbolt.

3

Some species increase, others diminish, and in a short space the generations of living creatures are changed and, like runners, pass on the torch of life.

3

When the body is assailed by the strong force of time and the limbs weaken from exhausted force, genius breaks down, and mind and speech fail. [Lat., Ubi jam valideis quassatum est viribus aevi Corpus, et obtuseis ceciderunt viribus artus, Claudicat ingenium delirat linguaque mensque.]

3

What is food to one man is bitter poison to others.

3

Such evil deeds could religion prompt.

3

Nothing comes from nothing.

3

From the heart of this fountain of delights wells up some bitter taste to choke them even amid the flowers.

3

Though the dungeon, the scourge, and the executioner be absent, the guilty mind can apply the goad and scorch with blows.

3
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