Best quotes by the French Author Marcel Proust

Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.
  • gratitude

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
  • consists

The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.
  • discovery

Let us be grateful to people who make us happy, they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.
  • friendship



Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.
  • Happiness

We become moral when we are unhappy.
  • Morals

Everything great in the world comes from neurotics. They alone have founded our religions and composed our masterpieces.
  • Mental

A woman one loves rarely suffices for all our needs, so we deceive her with another whom we do not love.
  • Infidelity

In a separation it is the one who is not really in loved who says the more tender things.
  • Love

People wish to learn to swim and at the same time to keep one foot on the ground.
  • Risk

We don't receive wisdom; we must discover it for ourselves after a journey that no one can take for us or spare us.
  • discover

Things don't change, but by and by our wishes change.
  • Change

Impelled by a state of mind which is destined not to last, we make our irrevocable decisions
  • Decisions

We do not succeed in changing things according to our desire, but gradually our desire changes.
  • Desires

We are healed of a suffering only by experiencing it in full.
  • Suffering

What a profound significance small things assume when the woman we love conceals them from us.
  • Things

A change in the weather is sufficient to recreate the world and ourselves.
  • Weather

All our final decisions are made in a state of mind that is not going to last.
  • Decisions

Time passes, and little by little everything that we have spoken in falsehood becomes true.
  • DeceptionLying

People have many different kinds of pleasure. The real one is that for which they will forsake the others.
  • Pleasure

There are perhaps no days of our childhood we lived so fully as those we spent with a favorite book.
  • Youth

Love is space and time measured by the heart.
  • heart

The charms of the passing woman are generally in direct proportion to the swiftness of her passing.
  • Charisma

Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible.
  • Happiness

It is always during a passing state of mind that we make lasting resolutions.
  • Solutions

A cathedral, a wave of storm, a dancer's leap, never turn out to be as high as we had hoped.
  • Expectation

Illness is the doctor to whom we pay most heed; to kindness, to knowledge we make promise only; pain we obey.
  • Illness

Often it is just lack of imagination that keeps a man from suffering very much.
  • Imagination

Let us leave pretty women to men devoid of imagination.
  • Men

The human plagiarism which is most difficult to avoid, for individuals... is the plagiarism of ourselves.
  • Plagiarism


Pictures quotes by Marcel Proust

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Marcel Proust Quotes About

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Marcel Proust time quotes

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Love is space and time measured by the heart.
  • heart

The time at our disposal each day is elastic; the passions we feel dilate it, those that inspire us shrink it, and habit fills it.
  • disposal

The world was not created once and for all time for each of us individually. There are added to it in the course of our life things of which we have never had any suspicion.
  • added

In theory one is aware that the earth revolves, but in practice one does not perceive it, the ground upon which one treads seems not to move, and one can live undisturbed. So it is with Time in one's life.
  • aware

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Marcel Proust love quotes

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In a separation it is the one who is not really in loved who says the more tender things.
  • Love

Love is space and time measured by the heart.
  • heart

Like everybody who is not in love, he thought one chose the person to be loved after endless deliberations and on the basis of particular qualities or advantages.
  • advantages

People who are not in love fail to understand how an intelligent man can suffer because of a very ordinary woman. This is like being surprised that anyone should be stricken with cholera because of a creature so insignificant as the comma bacillus.
  • Love

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Marcel Proust illness quotes

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Everything great in the world comes from neurotics. They alone have founded our religions and composed our masterpieces.
  • Mental

Illness is the doctor to whom we pay most heed; to kindness, to knowledge we make promise only; pain we obey.
  • Illness

The sensitiveness claimed by neurotic is matched by their egotism: they cannot abide the flaunting by others of the sufferings to which they pay an even increasing amount of attention in themselves.
  • Mental

Neurosis has an absolute genius for malingering. There is no illness which it cannot counterfeit perfectly. If it is capable of deceiving the doctor, how should it fail to deceive the patient?
  • Mental

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Marcel Proust happiness quotes

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Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.
  • gratitude

Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.
  • Happiness

Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible.
  • Happiness

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Marcel Proust memory quotes

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That translucent alabaster of our memories.
  • Memory

We are able to find everything in our memory, which is like a dispensary or chemical laboratory in which chance steers our hand sometimes to a soothing drug and sometimes to a dangerous poison.
  • Memory

Our memory is like a shop in the window of which is exposed now one, now another photograph of the same person. And as a rule the most recent exhibit remains for some time the only one to be seen.
  • Memory

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The time which we have at our disposal every day is elastic; the passions we feel expand it, those that we inspire contract it, and habit fills up what remains.
  • Relaxation

The true paradises are the paradises that we have lost.
  • paradise

The regularity of a habit is generally in proportion to its absurdity.
  • Habits

A powerful idea communicates some of its strength to him who challenges it.
  • Ideas



That translucent alabaster of our memories.
  • Memory

No exile at the South Pole or on the summit of Mont Blanc separates us more effectively from others than the practice of a hidden vice.
  • Virtue

Like everybody who is not in love, he thought one chose the person to be loved after endless deliberations and on the basis of particular qualities or advantages.
  • advantages

Happiness is beneficial for the body, but it is grief that develops the powers of the mind.
  • temps

Now are the woods all black, But still the sky is blue.
  • paul

A work of art that contains theories is like an object on which the price tag has been left.
  • Art

I perceived that to express those impressions, to write that essential book, which is the only true one, a great writer does not, in the current meaning of the word, invent it, but, since it exists already in each one of us, interprets it. The duty and the task of a writer are those of an interpreter.
  • Authors

It is in moments of illness that we are compelled to recognize that we live not alone but chained to a creature of a different kingdom, whole worlds apart, who has no knowledge of us and by whom it is impossible to make ourselves understood: our body.
  • Body

I understood that all the material of a literary work was in my past life, I understood that I had acquired it in the midst of frivolous amusements, in idleness, in tenderness and in pain, stored up by me without my divining its destination or even its survival, as the seed has in reserve all the ingredients which will nourish the plant.
  • Creativity

We say that the hour of death cannot be forecast, but when we say this we imagine that hour as placed in an obscure and distant future. It never occurs to us that it has any connection with the day already begun or that death could arrive this same afternoon, this afternoon which is so certain and which has every hour filled in advance.
  • Death

Lies are essential to humanity. They are perhaps as important as the pursuit of pleasure and moreover are dictated by that pursuit.
  • DeceptionLying

There's nothing like desire to prevent the things one says from having any resemblance to the things in one's mind.
  • Desires

The only real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes, in seeing the universe with the eyes of another, of hundreds of others, in seeing the hundreds of universes that each of them sees.
  • Discovery

For each illness that doctors cure with medicine, they provoke ten in healthy people by inoculating them with the virus that is a thousand times more powerful than any microbe: the idea that one is ill.
  • Doctors

The mistakes made by doctors are innumerable. They err habitually on the side of optimism as to treatment, of pessimism as to the outcome.
  • Doctors

When the mind has a tendency to dream, it is a mistake to keep dreams away from it, to ration its dreams. So long as you distract your mind from its dreams, it will not know them for what they are; you will always be being taken in by the appearance of things, because you will not have grasped their true nature. If a little dreaming is dangerous, the cure for it is not to dream less but to dream more, to dream all the time. One must have a thorough understanding of one
  • Dreams

The features of our face are hardly more than gestures which force of habit made permanent. Nature, like the destruction of Pompeii, like the metamorphosis of a nymph into a tree, has arrested us in an accustomed movement.
  • Face

Everything we think of as great has come to us from neurotics. It is they and they alone who found religions and create great works of art. The world will never realize how much it owes to them, and what they have suffered in order to bestow their gifts on it.
  • Greatness

Our intellect is not the most subtle, the most powerful, the most appropriate, instrument for revealing the truth. It is life that, little by little, example by example, permits us to see that what is most important to our heart, or to our mind, is learned not by reasoning but through other agencies. Then it is that the intellect, observing their superiority, abdicates its control to them upon reasoned grounds and agrees to become their collaborator and lackey.
  • Intelligence

People who are not in love fail to understand how an intelligent man can suffer because of a very ordinary woman. This is like being surprised that anyone should be stricken with cholera because of a creature so insignificant as the comma bacillus.
  • Love

We are able to find everything in our memory, which is like a dispensary or chemical laboratory in which chance steers our hand sometimes to a soothing drug and sometimes to a dangerous poison.
  • Memory

Our memory is like a shop in the window of which is exposed now one, now another photograph of the same person. And as a rule the most recent exhibit remains for some time the only one to be seen.
  • Memory

The sensitiveness claimed by neurotic is matched by their egotism: they cannot abide the flaunting by others of the sufferings to which they pay an even increasing amount of attention in themselves.
  • Mental

Neurosis has an absolute genius for malingering. There is no illness which it cannot counterfeit perfectly. If it is capable of deceiving the doctor, how should it fail to deceive the patient?
  • Mental

The paradoxes of today are the prejudices of tomorrow, since the most benighted and the most deplorable prejudices have had their moment of novelty when fashion lent them its fragile grace.
  • Paradox

The moments of the past do not remain still; they retain in our memory the motion which drew them towards the future, towards a future which has itself become the past, and draw us on in their train.
  • Past

As the Arab proverb says, The dog barks and the caravan passes. After having dropped this quotation, Mr. Norpois stopped to judge the effect it had on us. It was great; the proverb was known to us: it had been replaced that year among men of high worth by this other: Whoever sows the wind reaps the storm, which had needed some rest since it was not as indefatigable and hardy as, Working for the King of Prussia.
  • Profanity

There is no man, however wise, who has not at some period of his youth said things, or lived in a way the consciousness of which is so unpleasant to him in later life that he would gladly, if he could, expunge it from his memory.
  • Regret

It is comforting when one has a sorrow to lie in the warmth of one's bed and there, abandoning all effort and all resistance, to bury even one's head under the cover, giving one's self up to it completely, moaning like branches in the autumn wind. But there is still a better bed, full of divine odors. It is our sweet, our profound, our impenetrable friendship.
  • Sleep

Life is extraordinarily suave and sweet with certain natural, witty, affectionate people who have unusual distinction and are capable of every vice, but who make a display of none in public and about whom no one can affirm they have a single one. There is something supple and secret about them. Besides, their perversity gives spice to their most innocent occupations, such as taking a walk in the garden at night.
  • Virtue

The time at our disposal each day is elastic; the passions we feel dilate it, those that inspire us shrink it, and habit fills it.
  • disposal

A fashionable milieu is one in which everybody's opinion is made up of the opinion of all the others. Has everybody a different opinion? Then it is a literary milieu.
  • different

The world was not created once and for all time for each of us individually. There are added to it in the course of our life things of which we have never had any suspicion.
  • added

Every reader finds himself. The writer's work is merely a kind of optical instrument that makes it possible for the reader to discern what, without this book, he would perhaps never have seen in himself.
  • book

In theory one is aware that the earth revolves, but in practice one does not perceive it, the ground upon which one treads seems not to move, and one can live undisturbed. So it is with Time in one's life.
  • aware

People can have many different kinds of pleasure. The real one is that for which they will forsake the others.
  • different

There are perhaps no days of our childhood we lived so fully as those we believe we left without having lived them, those we spent with a favorite book.
  • books


Author similar to Marcel Proust


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Mark Twain 580 quotes
Samuel Johnson 438 quotes
George Eliot 218 quotes

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1
Best Marcel Proust quotes

Part 2
Marcel Proust pictures quotes

Part 3
Marcel Proust's Quotes About ...
Time
Love
Illness
Happiness
Memory
All Marcel Proust quotes

Part 4
Quotes by authors similar to Marcel Proust

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