Those who are animated by hope can perform what would seem impossibilities to those who are under the depressing influence of fear.

— Maria Edgeworth

The most spectacular Maria Edgeworth quotes that are new and everybody is talking about

The human heart, at whatever age, opens only to the heart that opens in return.

43

Surely it is much more generous to forgive and remember, than to forgive and forget.

18

If young women were not deceived into a belief that affectation pleases, they would scarcely trouble themselves to practise it so much.

14

What a misfortune it isto be bornawoman!? Why seek for knowledge, which can prove only that our wretchedness is irremediable? If a ray of light break in upon us, it is but to make darkness more visible; to show usthenew limits, the Gothic structure, theimpenetrable barriers of our prison.

11

I find the love of garden grows upon me as I grow older more and more.

Shrubs and flowers and such small gay things, that bloom and please and fade and wither and are gone and we care not for them, are refreshing interests, in life, and if we cannot say never fading pleasures, we may say unreproved pleasures and never grieving losses.

10

According to the Asiatics, Cupid's bow is strung with bees which are apt to sting, sometimes fatally, those who meddle with it.

7

Persons not habituated to reason often argue absurdly, because, from particular instances, they deduce general conclusions, and extend the result of their limited experience of individuals indiscriminately to whole classes.

6

In real friendship the judgment, the genius, the prudence of each party become the common property of both.

6

wit is often its own worst enemy.

6

Nature knows best, and she says, roar!

6

I've a great fancy to see my own funeral afore I die.

4

There is no moment like the present. The man who will not execute his resolutions when they are fresh upon him can have no hope from them afterwards: they will be dissipated, lost, and perish in the hurry and scurry of the world, or sunk in the slough of indolence.

3

About Maria Edgeworth

Quotes 87 sayings
Nationality Irish
Profession Novelist
Birthday October 16

Fortune's wheel never stands still the highest point is therefore the most perilous.

3

Business was his aversion; Pleasure was his business.

3

half the good intentions of my life have been frustrated by my unfortunate habit of putting things off till to-morrow.

3

Those who have lived in a house with spoiled children must have a lively recollection of the degree of torment they can inflict upon all who are within sight or hearing.

2

When one illusion vanishes, another shall appear, and, still leading me forward towards an horizon that retreats as I advance, the happy prospect of futurity shall vanish only with my existence.

1

The unaffected language of real feeling and benevolence is easily understood, and is never ridiculous.

1

We perfectly agreed in our ideas of traveling;

we hurried from place to place as fast as horses and wheels, and curses and guineas, could carry us.

1

Confidence is the best proof of love.

1

Young ladies who think of nothing but dress, public amusements, and forming what they call high connexions, are undoubtedly most easily managed, by the fear of what the world will say of them.

1

Our pleasures in literature do not, I think, decline with age;

last 1st of January was my eighty-second birthday, and I think that I had as much enjoyment from books as I ever had in my life.

1

Justice satisfies everybody.

0

Did the Warwickshire militia, who were chiefly artisans, teach the Irish to drink beer, or did they learn from the Irish how to drink whiskey?

0

Books only spoil the originality of genius.

Very well for those who can't think for themselves - But when one has made up one's opinions, there is no use in reading.

0

Man is to be held only by the slightest chains;

with the idea that he can break them at pleasure, he submits to them in sport.

0

there is no reasoning with imagination.

0

I ... practiced all the arts of apology, evasion, and invisibility, to which procrastinators must sooner or later be reduced.

0

We may make our future by the best use of the present. There is no moment like the present.

0

In marrying, a man does not, to be sure, marry his wife's mother;

and yet a prudent man, when he begins to think of the daughter, would look sharp at the mother; ay, and back to the grandmother too, and along the whole female line of ancestry.

0

It sometimes requires courage to fly from danger.

0

Promises are dangerous things to ask or to give.

0

The bore is good for promoting sleep;

but though he causeth sleep in others, it is uncertain whether he ever sleeps himself; as few can keep awake in his company long enough to see. It is supposed that when he sleeps it is with his mouth open.

0

No man ever distinguished himself who could not bear to be laughed at.

0

Politeness only teaches us to save others from unnecessary pain.

... You are not bound by politeness to tell any falsehoods.

0

Health can make money, but money cannot make health.

0

The everlasting quotation-lover dotes on the husks of learning.

0

There are two sorts of content; one is connected with exertion, the other with habits of indolence. The first is a virtue; the other, a vice.

0

A love-match was the only thing for happiness, where the parties could any way afford it.

0

Hope can produce the finest and most permanent springs of action.

0

Artificial manners vanish the moment the natural passions are touched.

0

Home! With what different sensations different people pronounce and hear that word pronounced!

0

The bore is usually considered a harmless creature, or of that class of irrationa bipeds who hurt only themselves.

0

Idleness, ennui, noise, mischief, riot, and a nameless train of mistaken notions of pleasure, are often classed, in a young man's mind, under the general head of liberty.

0

how impossible it is not to laugh in some company, or to laugh in others.

0

Alarmed successively by every fashionable medical terror of the day, she dosed her children with every specific which was publicly advertised or privately recommended...The consequence was, that the dangers, which had at first been imaginary, became real: these little victims of domestic medicine never had a day's health: they looked, and were, more dead than alive.

0

Illness was a sort of occupation to me, and I was always sorry to get well.

0

when driven to the necessity of explaining, I found that I did not myself understand what I meant.

0

every man who takes a part in politics, especially in times when parties run high, must expect to be abused; they must bear it; and their friends must learn to bear it for them.

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