Life is a journey that must be traveled no matter how bad the roads and accommodations.

— Oliver Goldsmith

The most floundering Oliver Goldsmith quotes that will add value to your life

Blame where you must, be candid where you can, And be each critic the Good-natured Man.

153

To make a fine gentleman, several trades are required, but chiefly a barber.

83

Fine declamation does not consist in flowery periods, delicate allusions of musical cadences, but in a plain, open, loose style, where the periods are long and obvious, where the same thought is often exhibited in several points of view.

77

One writer, for instance, excels at a plan or a title page, another works away at the body of the book, and a third is a dab at an index.

75

People seldom improve when they have no other model but themselves to copy.

67

Ridicule has always been the enemy of enthusiasm, and the only worthy opponent to ridicule is success.

65

Ceremonies are different in every country, but true politeness is everywhere the same.

59

Vain, very vain is my search to find; that happiness which only centers in the mind.

58

Life has been compared to a race, but the allusion improves by observing, that the most swift are usually the least manageable and the most likely to stray from the course. Great abilities have always been less serviceable to the possessors than moderate ones.

58

A man who leaves home to mend himself and others is a philosopher;

but he who goes from country to country, guided by the blind impulse of curiosity, is a vagabond.

58

Don't let us make imaginary evils, when you know we have so many real ones to encounter.

48

As for murmurs, mother, we grumble a little now and then, to be sure;

but there's no love lost between us.

48

About Oliver Goldsmith

Quotes 345 sayings
Nationality Irish
Profession Poet
Birthday November 10, 1730

Tenderness is a virtue.

38

People seldom improve when they have no other model, but themselves to copy after.

33

Wealth accumulates, and men decay.

32

Ask me no questions, and I'll tell you no lies.

31

Little things are great to little men.

28

Error is always talkative.

24

The ingratitude of the world can never deprive us of the conscious happiness of having acted with humanity ourselves.

22

Law grinds the poor, and rich men rule the law.

21

Good counsel rejected returns to enrich the givers bosom.

19

In all the silent manliness of grief.

19

No one but a fool would measure their satisfaction by what the world thinks of it.

19

Hope is such a bait, it covers any hook.

19

The ambitious are forever followed by adulation for they receive the most pleasure from flattery.

17

If one wishes to become rich they must appear rich.

17

Both wit and understanding are trifles without integrity;

it is that which gives value to every character. The ignorant peasant, without fault, is greater than the philosopher with many; for what is genius or courage without a heart?

16

Villainy, when detected, never gives up, but boldly adds impudence to imposture.

16

If you were to make little fishes talk, they would talk like whales.

15

The heart of every man lies open to the shafts of correction if the archer can take proper aim.

13

Hope, like the gleaming taper's light, Adorns and cheers our way;

And still, as darker grows the night, Emits a brighter ray.

13

The true use of speech is not so much to express our wants as to conceal them.

13

Silence is become his mother tongue.

12

Of praise a mere glutton, he swallow'd what came, And the puff a dunce, he mistook it for fame; Till his relish grown callous, almost to displease, Who pepper'd the highest was surest to please.

12

The pregnant quarry teem'd with human form.

12

People seek within a short span of life to satisfy a thousand desires, each of which is insatiable.

12

Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog And in that town a dog was found, As many dogs there be, Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound, And curs of low degree.

12

Aromatic plants bestowno spicy fragrance while they grow;

but crush'd or trodden to the ground,diffuse their balmy sweets around.

11

The mind is ever ingenious in making its own distress.

10

The first time I read an excellent book, it is to me just as if I had gained a new friend. When I read a book over I have perused before, it resembles the meeting with an old one.

10

Processions, cavalcades, and all that fund of gay frippery, furnished out by tailors, barbers, and tire-women, mechanically influence the mind into veneration; an emperor in his nightcap would not meet with half the respect of an emperor with a crown.

9

Every absurdity has a champion to defend it.

9

Let schoolmasters puzzle their brain, With grammar, and nonsense, and learning, Good liquor, I stoutly maintain, Gives genius a better discerning.

8

To what fortuitous occurrence do we not owe every pleasure and convenience of our lives.

8

Modesty seldom resides in a breast that is not enriched with nobler virtues.

7

When lovely woman stoops to folly, and finds too late that men betray, what charm can soothe her melancholy, what art can wash her guilt away?

7

A great source of calamity lies in regret and anticipation;

therefore a person is wise who thinks of the present alone, regardless of the past or future.

7

The company of fools may first make us smile, but in the end we always feel melancholy.

7

As boys should be educated with temperance, so the first greatest lesson that should be taught them is to admire frugality. It is by the exercise of this virtue alone they can ever expect to be useful members of society.

7
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