The longest absence is less perilous to love than the terrible trials of incessant proximity.

— Ouida

The most beautiful Ouida quotes that are little-known but priceless

An easy-going husband is the one indispensable comfort of life.

60

Emulation is active virtue; envy is brooding malice.

49

Scandals are like dandelion seeds--they are arrow-headed, and stick where they fall, and bring forth and multiply fourfold.

48

Petty laws breed great crimes.

47

Intensely selfish people are always very decided as to what they wish.

They do not waste their energies in considering the good of others.

33

Brussels is a gay little city that lies as bright within its girdle of woodland as any butterfly that rests upon moss.

29

Could we see when and where we are to meet again, we would be more tender when we bid our friends goodbye.

29

Take hope from the heart of man and you make him a beast of prey.

24

Music is not a science any more than poetry is. It is a sublime instinct, like genius of all kinds.

15

I do not wish to be a coward like the father of mankind and throw the blame upon a woman.

13

Even of death Christianity has made a terror which was unknown to the gay calmness of the Pagan and the stoical repose of the Indian.

12

Familiarity is a magician that is cruel to beauty but kind to ugliness.

12

About Ouida

Quotes 113 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Novelist
Birthday October 16

A cruel story runs on wheels, and every hand oils the wheels as they run.

12

A great love is an absolute isolation and an absolute absorption.

7

Humiliation is a guest that only comes to those who have made ready his resting-place, and will give him a fair welcome. ... no one can disgrace you save yourself.

7

The loss of our illusions is the only loss from which we never recover.

6

There is a chord in every heart that has a sigh in it if touched aright.

6

Indifference is the invincible grant of the world.

5

In its permission to man to render subject to him all other living creatures of the earth, it continued the cruelty of the barbarian and the pagan, and endowed these with what appeared a divine authority.

5

Truth is a rough, honest, helter-skelter terrier that none like to see brought into their drawing rooms.

5

A little scandal is an excellent thing;

nobody is ever brighter or happier of tongue than when he is making mischief of his neighbors.

5

To vice, innocence must always seem only a superior kind of chicanery.

5

Men are always optimists when they look inwards, and pessimists when they look round them.

4

We only see clearly when we have reached the depths of woe.

3

Charity in various guises is an intruder the poor see often;

but courtesy and delicacy are visitants with which they are seldom honored.

3

There is no knife that cuts so sharply and with such poisoned blade as treachery.

3

The fire of true enthusiasm is like the fires of Baku, which no water can ever quench, and which burn steadily on from night to day, and year to year, because their well-spring is eternal.

3

The bread of bitterness is the food on which men grow to their fullest stature;

the waters of bitterness are the debatable ford through which they reach the shores of wisdom; the ashes boldly grasped and eaten without faltering are the price that must be paid for the golden fruit of knowledge.

3

Genius cannot escape the taint of its time more than a child the influence of its begetting.

3

It is hard work to be good when you are very little and very hungry, and have many sticks to beat you, and no mother's lips to kiss you.

3

The scorn of genius is the most arrogant and the most boundless of all scorn.

3

If all feeling for grace and beauty were not extinguished in the mass of mankind at the actual moment, such a method of locomotion as cycling could never have found acceptance; no man or woman with the slightest aesthetic sense could assume the ludicrous position necessary for it.

3

The heart of silver falls ever into the hands of brass.

The sensitive herb is eaten as grass by the swine.

3

Dishonor is like the Aaron's Beard in the hedgerows; it can only poison if it be plucked.

3

Fame! it is the flower of a day, that dies when the next sun rises.

3

Flowers belong to Fairyland: the flowers and the birds and the butterflies are all that the world has kept of its golden age--the only perfectly beautiful things on earth--joyous, innocent, half divine--useless, say they who are wiser than God.

3

Woman's fatal weakness is to desire sympathy and comprehension. --"Wanda

2

Hypocrites weep, and you cannot tell their tears from those of saints;

but no bad man ever laughed sweetly yet.

2

A pipe is a pocket philosopher,--a truer one than Socrates, for it never asks questions. Socrates must have been very tiresome, when one thinks of it.

1

Christianity has made of death a terror which was unknown to the gay calmness of the Pagan.

1

When one has not father, or mother, or brother, and all one's friends have barely bread enough for themselves, life cannot be very easy, nor its crusts very many at any time.

0

Friendship needs to be rooted in respect, but love can live upon itself alone

0

Genius scorns the power of gold: it is wrong.

Gold is the war-scythe on its chariot, which mows down the millions of its foes, and gives free passage to the sun-coursers with which it leaves those heavenly fields of light for the gross battlefields of earth.

0

A just chastisement may benefit a man, though it seldom does;

but an unjust one changes all his blood to gall.

0

When passion and habit long lie in company it is only slowly and with incredulity that habit awakens to finds its companion fled, itself alone.

0

We do not want to think. We do not want to hear. We do not care about anything. Only give us a good dinner and plenty of money, and let us outshine our neighbors. There is the Nineteenth Century Gospel.

0

Power is sweet, and when you are a little clerk you love its sweetness quite as much as if you were an emperor, and maybe you love it a good deal more.

0

The art of pleasing is more based on the art of seeming pleased than people think of, and she disarmed the prejudices of her enemies by the unaffected delight she appeared to take in themselves.

0

Why is youth so short and age so long?

0
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