It is the nature of the strong heart, that like the palm tree it strives ever upwards when it is most burdened.

— Philip Sidney

The most inspiring Philip Sidney quotes that will transform you to a better person

In forming a judgment, lay your hearts void of foretaken opinions;

else, whatsoever is done or said, will be measured by a wrong rule; like them who have jaundice, to whom everything appears yellow.

77

It is a great happiness to be praised of them that are most praise-worthy.

60

My true love hath my heart, and I have his

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Philip Sidney quote Either I will find a way, or I will make

Either I will find a way, or I will make one.

18

Either I will find a way, or I will make one.

45

The ingredients of health and long life, are great temperance, open air, easy labor, and little care.

44

Like the air-invested heron, great persons should conduct themselves;

and the higher they be, the less they should show.

34
Philip Sidney quote Either I will find a way, or I will make

Either I will find a way, or I will make One.

6

Happiness is a sunbeam, which may pass though a thousand bosoms without losing a particle of its original ray.

24

Cupid makes it his sport to pull the warrior's plum.

19

Fool," said my muse to me. "Look in thy heart and write.

14

No decking sets forth anything so much as affection.

12

There is little hope of equity where rebellion reigns.

10

Music, I say, the most divine striker of the senses.

9

About Philip Sidney

Quotes 185 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Soldier
Birthday October 16

The only disadvantage of an honest heart is credulity.

9

Sin is the mother, and shame the daughter of lewdness.

9

No is no negative in a woman's mouth.

7

Malice, in its false witness, promotes its tale with so cunning a confusion, so mingles truths with falsehoods, surmises with certainties, causes of no moment with matters capital, that the accused can absolutely neither grant nor deny, plead innocen.

7

Come Sleep! Oh Sleep, the certain knot of peace, the baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, the poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, the indifferent judge between the high and low.

6

O you virtuous owle, The wise Minerva's only fowle.

6

They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts.

5

Love, one time, layeth burdens; another time, giveth wings.

5

The observances of the church concerning feasts and fasts are tolerably well kept, since the rich keep the feasts and the poor the fasts.

5

The truly valiant dare everything but doing anybody an injury.

4

Every present occasion will catch the senses of the vain man;

and with that bridle and saddle you may ride him.

4

The scourge of life, and death's extreme disgrace, The smoke of hell,--that monster called Paine.

4

Those lovers scorn whom that love doth possess? Do they call virtue there ungratefulness?

4

The first mark of valor is defence.

3

In victory, the hero seeks the glory, not the prey.

3

Shallow brooks murmur most, deep and silent slide away.

3

To be ambitious of true honor and of the real glory and perfection of our nature is the very principle and incentive of virtue; but to be ambitious of titles, place, ceremonial respects, and civil pageantry, is as vain and little as the things are which we court

3

My true-love hath my heart, and I have his, By just exchange, one for the other given; I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss, There never was a better bargain driven.

3

It is a lively spark of nobleness to descend in most favour to one when he is lowest in affliction

3

A dull head thinks of no better way to show himself wise, than by suspecting everything in his way.

3

What is birth to a man if it shall be a stain to his dead ancestors to have left such an offspring?

3

Laws are not made like lime-twigs or nets, to catch everything that toucheth them; but rather like sea-marks, to guide from shipwreck the ignorant passenger.

3

There is no man suddenly either excellently good or extremely evil, but grows either as he holds himself up in virtue or lets himself slide to viciousness.

3

It many times falls out that we deem ourselves much deceived in others because we first deceived ourselves.

3

Woman was formed to admire; man to be admirable. His are the glories of the sun at noonday; hers the softened splendors of the midnight moon.

2

Take thou of me, sweet pillowes, sweetest bed;

A chamber deafe of noise, and blind of light, A rosie garland and a weary hed.

2

As the love of the heavens makes us heavenly, the love of virtue virtuous, so doth the love of the world make one become worldly.

2

What is mine, even to my life, is hers I love; but the secret of my friend is not mine!

2

Contentions for trifles can get but a trifling victory.

2

Vice is but a nurse of agonies.

2

Blasphemous words betray the vain foolishness of the speaker.

2

A brave captain is as a root, out of which, as branches, the courage of his soldiers doth spring.

2

When it shall please God to bring thee to man's estate, use great providence and circumspection in choosing thy wife. For from thence will spring all thy future good or evil; and it is an action of life, like unto a stratagem of war; wherein a man can err but once!

2

Much more may a judge overweigh himself in cruelty than in clemency.

1

Valor is abased by too much loftiness.

1

In the performance of a good action, we not only benefit ourselves, but we confer a blessing upon others.

1

In the clear mind of virtue treason can find no hiding-place.

1
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