What are the best Samuel Taylor Coleridge quotes?

Accurate and famous quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge about poetry, little, language, imagination, words. Samuel Taylor Coleridge is well-known English poet with many wise quotes. You can read the best of all time and enjoy Top 10 lists. Share the best Samuel Taylor Coleridge sayings with your friends and family.


  1. What comes from the heart, goes to the heart.


  2. Advice is like snow -- the softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon, and the deeper it sinks into the mind.


  3. Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm.


  4. People of humor are always in some degree people of genius.




  5. Friendship is a sheltering tree.


  6. The wise only possess ideas; the greater part of mankind are possessed by them.


  7. No one does anything from a single motive.

    • motivational

  8. And the Devil did grin, for his darling sin is pride that apes humility.


  9. Aptitude found in the understanding and is often inherited. Genius coming from reason and imagination, rarely.


  10. Plagiarists are always suspicious of being stolen from.


  11. I have seen great intolerance shown in support of tolerance.


  12. Humor is consistent with pathos, whilst wit is not.

    • humor

  13. The most happy marriage I can imagine to myselfwould be the union of a deaf man to a blind woman.


  14. Every reform, however necessary, will by weak minds be carried to an excess, which will itself need reforming.


  15. Good and bad men are less than they seem.


  16. All sympathy not consistent with acknowledged virtue is but disguised selfishness.


  17. He is the best physician who is the most ingenious inspirer of hope.


  18. Oh worse than everything, is kindness counterfeiting absent love.


  19. Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherited; genius, being the action of reason or imagination, rarely or never.


  20. My case is a species of madness, only that it is a derangement of the Volition, and not of the intellectual faculties.


  21. Prose, words in their best order. Poetry, the best words in the best order.


  22. Some men are like musical glasses; to produce their finest tones you must keep them wet.


  23. Our own heart, and not other men's opinion, forms our true honor.


  24. Oh Sleep! it is a gentle thing, beloved from pole to pole, to Mary Queen the praise be given! She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven, that slid into my soul.


  25. Works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.


  26. Poor little Foal of an oppressed race! I love the languid patience of thy face.


  27. Alas! they had been friends in youth; but whispering tongues can poison truth.


  28. To most men experience is like the stern lights of a ship, which illuminate only the track it has passed.


  29. To see him act is like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning.


  30. Greatness and goodness are not means, but ends.



Top 10 quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge image quotes

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About Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Where is Samuel Taylor Coleridge from? Samuel Taylor Coleridge is English who said awesome wise words. Well-known and respected in English society for wise sayings. The following quotations and images represent the English nature embed in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's character.

What Samuel Taylor Coleridge was famous for? Samuel Taylor Coleridge is famous poet with many good quotes. Influential and well recognized poet all over the world. Browse a lot of Samuel Taylor Coleridge books and reference books with quotes from Samuel Taylor Coleridge on Amazon.


What are the best poetry quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge?


    I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose = words in their best order; --poetry = the best words in the best order.


    That willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith.

    • poetry

    Poetry has been to me its own exceeding great reward; it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.


    I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose = words in their best order; - poetry = the best words in the best order.


    Poetry: the best words in the best order.


    In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea.

    • poetry

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What are the best little quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge?


    The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions -- the little soon forgotten charities of a kiss or smile, a kind look, a heartfelt compliment, and the countless infinitesimal of pleasurable and genial feeling.


    The genius of the Spanish people is exquisitely subtle, without being at all acute; hence there is so much humour and so little wit in their literature.


    The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions - the little, soon forgotten charities of a kiss or a smile, a kind look or heartfelt compliment.


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What are the best language quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge?


    Works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.

    • imagination

    Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.


    Poetry: the best words in the best order.

    • definitions

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What are the best imagination quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge?


    Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherited; genius, being the action of reason or imagination, rarely or never.

    • action

    Works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.

    • imagination

    A poet ought not to pick nature's pocket. Let him borrow, and so borrow as to repay by the very act of borrowing. Examine nature accurately, but write from recollection, and trust more to the imagination than the memory.


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What are the best words quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge?


    Prose, words in their best order. Poetry, the best words in the best order.

    • words

    I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose = words in their best order; - poetry = the best words in the best order.

    • best

    Poetry: the best words in the best order.

    • definitions

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More quotes by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Want some more good quotations by Samuel Taylor Coleridge? Explore the rest of 89 sayings by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.


How inimitably graceful children are in general before they learn to dance!


I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose = words in their best order; --poetry = the best words in the best order.

  • poetry

Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee,Whether the summer clothe the general earth with greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing between the tufts of snow on the bare branch Of mossy apple tree.


I do not call the sod under my feet my country; but language -- religion -- government -- blood -- identity in these makes men of one country.




General principles... are to the facts as the root and sap of a tree are to its leaves.


Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom.


In politics, what begins in fear usually ends in failure.


Five miles meandering with mazy motion,Through dale the sacred river ran,Then reached the caverns measureless to man,And sank the tumult to a lifeless ocean:And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from farAncestral voices prophesying war!


The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions -- the little soon forgotten charities of a kiss or smile, a kind look, a heartfelt compliment, and the countless infinitesimal of pleasurable and genial feeling.

  • things

Poetry: the best words in the best order.

  • definitions

The three great ends which a statesman ought to propose to himself in the government of a nation, are -- 1. Security to possessors; 2. Facility to acquirers; and, 3. Hope to all.


Forth from his dark and lonely hiding-place, (Portentous sight!) the owlet Atheism, sailing on obscene wings athwart the noon, drops his blue-fringed lids, and holds them close, and hooting at the glorious sun in Heaven, cries out, Where is it?


Poetry has been to me its own exceeding great reward; it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.

  • beautiful

Sympathy constitutes friendship; but in love there is a sort of antipathy, or opposing passion. Each strives to be the other, and both together make up one whole.


In politics, what begins in fear usually ends in folly.

  • politics

If a man could pass through Paradise in a dream, and have a flower presented to him as a pledge that his soul had really been there, and if he found that flower in his hand when he awake - Aye, what then?


The most happy marriage I can picture or imagine to myself would be the union of a deaf man to a blind woman.


Advice is like snow - the softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon, and the deeper in sinks into the mind.


A man may devote himself to death and destruction to save a nation; but no nation will devote itself to death and destruction to save mankind.


Swans sing before they die -- t'were no bad thing did certain persons die before they sing.


As I live and am a man, this is an unexaggerated tale - my dreams become the substances of my life.


The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions - the little, soon forgotten charities of a kiss or a smile, a kind look or heartfelt compliment.

  • smile

You see how this House of Commons has begun to verify all the ill prophecies that were made of it -- low, vulgar, meddling with everything, assuming universal competency, and flattering every base passion -- and sneering at everything noble refined and truly national. The direct tyranny will come on by and by, after it shall have gratified the multitude with the spoil and ruin of the old institutions of the land.


What if you slept? And what if, in your sleep, you dreamed? And what if, in your dream, you went to heavenand there plucked an strange and beautiful flower?And what if, when you awoke, you had the flower in your hand? Ah, what then?


Why are not more gems from our great authors scattered over the country? Great books are not in everybody's reach; and though it is better to know them thoroughly than to know them only here and there, yet it is a good work to give a little to those who have not the time nor means to get more.


No mind is thoroughly well organized that is deficient in a sense of humor.


How like herrings and onions our vices are in the morning after we have committed them.


Reviewers are usually people who would have been, poets, historians, biographer, if they could. They have tried their talents at one thing or another and have failed; therefore they turn critic.


What is a epigram? A dwarfish whole. Its body brevity, and wit its soul.


Water, water, everywhere,And all the boards did shrink.Water, water everywhere,Nor any drop to drink.The very deep did rot: O Christ!That ever this should be!Yea, slimy things did crawl with legsUpon the slimy sea.


A religion, that is, a true religion, must consist of ideas and facts both; not of ideas alone without facts, for then it would be mere Philosophy; -- nor of facts alone without ideas, of which those facts are symbols, or out of which they arise, or upon which they are grounded: for then it would be mere History.


Our quaint metaphysical opinions, in an hour of anguish, are like playthings by the bedside of a child deathly sick.


All thoughts, all passions, all delightsWhatever stirs this mortal frameAll are but ministers of LoveAnd feed His sacred flame.

  • love

The principle of the Gothic architecture is infinity made imaginable.


Exclusively of the abstract sciences, the largest and worthiest portion of our knowledge consists of aphorisms: and the greatest and best of men is but an aphorism.

  • profanity

A poet ought not to pick nature's pocket. Let him borrow, and so borrow as to repay by the very act of borrowing. Examine nature accurately, but write from recollection, and trust more to the imagination than the memory.

  • accurately

There are three classes into which all the women past seventy that ever I knew were to be divided: 1. That dear old soul; 2. That old woman; 3. That old witch.


That willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith.

  • poetry

Swans sing before they die - 'twere no bad thing should certain persons die before they sing.


Every reform, however necessary, will by weak minds be carried to an excess, that itself will need reforming.


Rights! There are no rights whatever without corresponding duties. Look at the history of the growth of our constitution, and you will see that our ancestors never upon any occasion stated, as a ground for claiming any of their privileges, an abstract right inherent in themselves; you will nowhere in our parliamentary records find the miserable sophism of the Rights of Man.


Readers may be divided into four classes: 1) Sponges, who absorb all that they read and return it in nearly the same state, only a little dirtied. 2) Sand-glasses, who retain nothing and are content to get through a book for the sake of getting through the time. 3) Strain-bags, who retain merely the dregs of what they read. 4) Mogul diamonds, equally rare and valuable, who profit by what they read, and enable others to profit by it also


An instinctive taste teaches men to build their churches with spire steeples which point as with a silent finger to the sky and stars.

  • religion

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea.

  • poetry

He who begins by loving Christianity more than Truth, will proceed by loving his sect or church better than Christianity, and end in loving himself better than all.


The genius of the Spanish people is exquisitely subtle, without being at all acute; hence there is so much humour and so little wit in their literature.

  • acute

As it must not, so genius cannot be lawless; for it is even that constitutes its genius -- the power of acting creatively under laws of its own origination.


Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.

  • language

An orphans curse would drag to hell A spirit from on high; But oh! How more horrible that that Is the curse in a dead man’s eye!


All thoughts, all passions, all delights Whatever stirs this mortal frame All are but ministers of Love And feed His sacred flame.


Look through the whole history of countries professing the Romish religion, and you will uniformly find the leaven of this besetting and accursed principle of action -- that the end will sanction any means.

  • religion

And though thou notest from thy safe recess old friends burn dim, like lamps in noisome air love them for what they are; nor love them less, because to thee they are not what they were.

  • friends

Silence does not always mark wisdom.


Our own heart, and not other men's opinions form our true honor.


I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose = words in their best order; - poetry = the best words in the best order.

  • best

How deep a wound to morals and social purity has that accursed article of the celibacy of the clergy been! Even the best and most enlightened men in Romanist countries attach a notion of impurity to the marriage of a clergyman. And can such a feeling be without its effect on the estimation of the wedded life in general? Impossible! and the morals of both sexes in Spain, Italy, France, and. prove it abundantly.


The three great ends which a statesman ought to propose to himself in the government of a nation, are one, Security to possessors; two, facility to acquirers; and three, hope to all.


Water, water, everywhere And all the boards did shrink Water, water everywhere Nor any drop to drink.


An orphan's curse would drag to hell, a spirit from on high; but oh! more horrible than that, is a curse in a dead man's eye!

  • death

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Poets similar to Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge favorite topics

Samuel Taylor Coleridge is famous for his passion about poetry, little, language, imagination, words. Check out great quotations and affirmations on these topics.


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When was Samuel Taylor Coleridge birthday? Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born on October 21, 1772.

Who is Samuel Taylor Coleridge? Some facts about Samuel Taylor Coleridge from biography. Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. He is probably best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well a... Read more about Samuel Taylor Coleridge on Wikipedia or watch videos with quotes from Samuel Taylor Coleridge on YouTube. Browse a lot of books about Samuel Taylor Coleridge on Amazon to get more reference.

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