The world has no sympathy with any but positive griefs. It will pity you for what you lose; never for what you lack

— Sophie Swetchine

The most satisfaction Sophie Swetchine quotes that are proven to give you inner joy

Travel is the frivolous part of serious lives, and the serious part of frivolous ones.

48

There is a transcendent power in example.

34

Silence is like nightfall. Objects are lost in it insensibly.

18

The chains which cramp us most are those which weigh on us least.

11

There is, by God's grace, an immeasurable distance between late and too late.

8

The mind wears the colors of the soul, as a valet those of his master.

7

In youth we feel richer for every new illusion; in maturer years, for every one we lose.

6

He who has never denied himself for the sake of giving has but glanced at the joys of charity.

6

Our vanity is the constant enemy of our dignity.

5

Old age is not one of the beauties of creation, but it is one of its harmonies.

The law of contrasts is one of the laws of beauty. Under the conditions of our climate, shadow gives light its worth; sternness enhances mildness; solemnity, splendor. Varying proportions of size support and subserve one another.

5

Let us not fail to scatter along our pathway the seeds of kindness and sympathy.

Some of them will doubtless perish; but if one only lives, it will perfume our steps and rejoice our eyes.

5

A malicious enemy is better than a clumsy friend.

5

About Sophie Swetchine

Quotes 129 sayings
Nationality Russian
Profession Author
Birthday October 16

Since there must be chimeras, why is not perfection the chimera of all men?

5

We are all of us, in this world, more or less like St.

January, whom the inhabitants of Naples worship one day, and pelt with baked apples the next.

4

By becoming unhappy, we sometimes learn how to be less so.

4

There are two ways of attaining an important end, force and perseverance;

the silent power of the latter grows irresistible with time.

4

One must be a somebody before they can have an enemy.

One must be a force before he can be resisted by another force.

3

Only those faults which we encounter in ourselves are insufferable to us in others.

3

The best of lessons, for a good many people, would be to listen at a keyhole.

It is a pity for such that the practice is dishonorable.

3

Loving souls are like paupers. They live on what is given them.

3

Providence has hidden a charm in difficult undertakings, which is appreciated only by those who dare to grapple with them.

3

Might we not say to the confused voices which sometimes arise from the depths of our being: "Ladies, be so kind as to speak only four at a time?"

3

There are words which are worth as much as the best actions, for they contain the germ of them all.

3

We deceive ourselves when we fancy that only weakness needs support. Strength needs it far more.

3

A friendship will be young after the lapse of half a century;

a passion is old at the end of three months.

3

To have ideas is to gather flowers; to think is to weave them into garlands.

3

Death is the justification of all the ways of the Christian, the last end of all his sacrifices, the touch of the Great Master which completes the picture.

2

The injustice of men subserves the justice of God, and often His mercy.

1

Friendship is like those ancient altars where the unhappy, and even the guilty, found a sure asylum.

1

We are often prophets to others only because we are our own historians.

0

Time is the shower of Danae; each drop is golden.

0

Real sorrow is almost as difficult to discover as real poverty.

An instinctive delicacy hides the rays of the one and the wounds of the other.

0

The most culpable of the excesses of Liberty is the harm she does herself.

0

The best advice on the art of being happy is about as easy to follow as advice to be well when one is sick.

0

The Christian's God is a God of metamorphoses.

You cast grief into his bosom: you draw thence, peace. You cast in despair: 'tis hope that rises to the surface. It is a sinner whose heart he moves. It is a saint who returns him thanks.

0

Old age is not one of the beauties of creation, but it is one of its harmonies.

0

Youth should be a savings bank.

0

We are amused through the intellect, but it is the heart that saves us from ennui.

0

There are but two future verbs which man may appropriate confidently and without pride: "I shall suffer," and "I shall die.

0

The root of sanctity is sanity. A man must be healthy before he can be holy. We bathe first, and then perfume.

0

When we see the shameful fortunes amassed in all quarters of the globe, are we not impelled to exclaim that Judas' thirty pieces of silver have fructified across the centuries?

0

Happiness and Virtue clasp hands and walk together.

0

True poets, like great artists, have scarcely any childhood, and no old age.

0

What I value most next to eternity is time.

0

There are questions so indiscreet, that they deserve neither truth nor falsehood in reply.

0

To reveal imprudently the spot where we are most sensitive and vulnerable is to invite a blow. The demigod Achilles admitted no one to his confidence.

0

We expect everything and are prepared for nothing.

0

When fresh sorrows have caused us to take some steps in the right way, we may not complain. We have invested in a life annuity, but the income remains.

0

Years do not make sages; they only make old men.

0
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