Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goals.

— Sydney Smith

The most fantastic Sydney Smith quotes that will add value to your life

It is the greatest of all mistakes to do nothing because you can only do little — do what you can.

123

Whatever you are by nature, keep to it;

never desert your line of talent. Be what nature intended you for, and you will succeed.

45

If you want to improve your understanding, drink coffee.

32

Life is to be fortified by many friendships.

To love and to be loved is the greatest happiness of existence.

30

To love and be loved is the great happiness of existence.

25

Madam, I have been looking for a person who disliked gravy all my life;

let us swear eternal friendship.

22

A comfortable house is a great source of happiness.

It ranks immediately after health and a good conscience.

21

Never try to reason the prejudice out of a man. It was not reasoned into him, and cannot be reasoned out.

21

The thing about performance, even if it's only an illusion, is that it is a celebration of the fact that we do contain within ourselves infinite possibilities.

20

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea! How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea.

20

A man who wishes to make his way in life could do no better than go through the world with a boiling tea-kettle in his hand.

17

In composing, as a general rule, run your pen through every other word you have written; you have no idea what vigor it will give your style.

14

About Sydney Smith

Quotes 88 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Clergyman
Birthday 3 June 1771

You find people ready enough to do the Samaritan, without the oil and twopence.

14

It is the greatest of all mistakes to do nothing because you can only do a little. Do what you can.

14

No furniture is so charming as books.

13

The writer does the most good who gives his reader the most knowledge and takes from him the least time.

13

we know nothing of tomorrow, our business is to be good and happy today

11

I look upon Switzerland as an inferior sort of Scotland.

11

Marriage resembles a pair of shears, so joined that they cannot be separated;

often moving in opposite directions, yet always punishing anyone who comes between them.

10

If I were to begin life again, I would devote it to music.

It is the only cheap and unpunished rapture upon earth.

9

No man can ever end with being superior who will not begin with being inferior.

8

I always fear that creation will expire before teatime.

8

Poverty is no disgrace to a man, but it is confoundedly inconvenient.

6

Have the courage to be ignorant of a great number of things, in order to avoid the calamity of being ignorant of everything.

6

Live always in the best company when you read.

6

When you rise in the morning, form a resolution to make the day a happy one for a fellow creature.

5

He who drinks a tumbler of London water has literally in his stomach more animated beings than there are men, women, and children on the face of the globe.

5

Lucy, dear child, mind your arithmetic.

You know in the first sum of yours I ever saw there was a mistake. You had carried two (as a cab is licensed to do), and you ought, dear Lucy, to have carried but one. Is this a trifle? What would life be without arithmetic, but a scene of horrors.

5

People who love only once in their lives are shallow people.

What they call their loyalty, and their fidelity, I call either the lethargy of custom, or their lack of imagination

5

What would life be without arithmetic, but a scene of horrors?

5

Never talk for half a minute without pausing and giving others a chance to join in.

5

A great deal of talent is lost to the world for want of a little courage.

5

Politeness is good nature regulated by good sense.

4

The longer I live, the more I am convinced that the apothecary is of more importance than Seneca; and that half the unhappiness in the world proceeds from little stoppages; from a duct choked up, from food pressing in the wrong place, from a vexed duodenum, or an agitated pylorus.

4

Human beings cling to their delicious tyrannies and to their exquisite nonsense, till death stares them in the face.

4

Errors, to be dangerous, must have a great deal of truth mingled with them.

It is only from this alliance that they can ever obtain an extensive circulation.

4

Among the smaller duties of life I hardly know any one more important than that of not praising where praise is not due.

4

Let the Dean and Canons lay their heads together and the thing will be done.

3

Resolve to make at least one person happy every day, and then in ten years you may have made three thousand, six hundred and fifty persons happy, or brightened a small town by your contribution to the fund of general enjoyment.

3

Great men hallow a whole people, and lift up all who live in their time.

3

He had occasional flashes of silence that made his conversation perfectly delightful.

3

Avoid shame but do not seek glory --nothing so expensive as glory.

3

Heat, ma am! It was so dreadful here that I found there was nothing left for it but to take off my flesh and sit in my bones.

3

It is always right that a man should be able to render a reason for the faith that is within him.

3

I am convinced digestion is the great secret of life.

2

Correspondences are like small clothes before the invention of suspenders;

it is impossible to keep them up.

2

His enemies might have said before that he talked rather too much;

but now he has occasional flashes of silence, that make his conversation perfectly delightful.

1

A great deal of talent is lost to the world for want of a little courage.

Every day sends to their graves obscure men whose timidity prevented them from making a first effort.

1

Some men have only one book in them, others a library.

1
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