The spirit of Greece, passing through and ascending above the world, hath so animated universal nature, that the very rocks and woods, the very torrents and wilds burst forth with it.

— Walter Savage Landor

The most simplistic Walter Savage Landor quotes you will be delighted to read

There is nothing on earth divine except humanity.

49

People, like nails, lose their effectiveness when they lose direction and begin to bend.

47

My thoughts are my company; I can bring them together, select them, detain them, dismiss them.

26

A man's vanity tells him what is honor, a man's conscience what is justice.

26

We are no longer happy so soon as we wish to be happier.

23

Truth is a point, the subtlest and finest;

harder than adamant; never to be broken, worn away, or blunted. Its only bad quality is, that it is sure to hurt those who touch it; and likely to draw blood, perhaps the life blood, of those who press earnestly upon it.

22

Friendship is a vase, which, when it is flawed by heat, or violence, or accident, may as well be broken at once; it can never be trusted after.

19

We are no longer happy as soon as we wish to be happier.

18

The Siren waits thee, singing song for song.

17

The flame of anger, bright and brief, sharpens the barb of love.

17

A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods.

He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger's end.

15

What is reading, but silent conversation.

15

About Walter Savage Landor

Quotes 227 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

Great men always pay deference to greater.

14

We think that we suffer from ingratitude, while in reality we suffer from self-love.

13

Heat and animosity, contest and conflict, may sharpen the wits, although they rarely do; they never strengthen the understanding, clear the perspicacity, guide the judgment, or improve the heart.

12

Music is God's gift to man, the only art of Heaven given to earth, the only art of earth we take to Heaven.

11

We fancy we suffer from ingratitude, while in reality we suffer from self-love.

11

Religion is the eldest sister of philosophy: on whatever subjects they may differ, it is unbecoming in either to quarrel, and most so about their inheritance.

10

Study is the bane of childhood, the oil of youth, the indulgence of adulthood, and a restorative in old age.

10

We talk on principal, but act on motivation.

10

Absence and death are the same -- only that in death there is no suffering.

10

We cannot be contented because we are happy, and we cannot be happy because we are contented.

9

Men, like nails, lose their usefulness when they lose their direction and begin to bend.

9

In argument, truth always prevails finally; in politics, falsehood always.

9

Goodness does not more certainly make men happy than happiness makes them good.

9

It is delightful to kiss the eyelashes of the beloved--is it not? But never so delightful as when fresh tears are on them.

8

Cruelty is the highest pleasure to the cruel man; it is his love.

7

I strove with none; for none was worth my strife.

7

Despotism sits nowhere so secure as under the effigy and ensigns of freedom.

7

The habit of pleasing by flattery makes a language soft;

the fear of offending by truth makes it circuitous and conventional.

7

The religion of Christ is peace and good-will,--the religion of Christendom is war and ill-will.

6

Nothing is pleasanter to me than exploring in a library.

6

Of all failures, to fail in a witticism is the worst, and the mishap is the more calamitous in a drawn-out and detailed one

5

Prose on certain occasions can bear a great deal of poetry;

on the other hand, poetry sinks and swoons under a moderate weight of prose.

5

When a cat flatters ... he is not insincere: you may safely take it for real kindness.

5

It appears to be among the laws of nature, that the mighty of intellect should be pursued and carped by the little, as the solitary flight of one great bird is followed by the twittering petulance of many smaller.

5

When the mind loses its feeling for elegance, it grows corrupt and groveling, and seeks in the crowd what ought to be found at home.

5

Wrong is but falsehood put in practice.

5

He who brings ridicule to bear against truth finds in his hand a blade without a hilt.

5

We care not how many see us in choler, when we rave and bluster, and make as much noise and bustle as we can; but if the kindest and most generous affection comes across us, we suppress every sign of it, and hide ourselves in nooks and covert.

5

The wise become as the unwise in the enchanted chambers of Power, whose lamps make every face the same colour.

4

Political men, like goats, usually thrive best among inequalities.

4

Cruelty, if we consider it as a crime, is the greatest of all;

if we consider it as a madness, we are equally justifiable in applying to it the readiest and the surest means of oppression.

4

A little praise is good for a shy temper; it teaches it to rely on the kindness of others.

4

How sweet and sacred idleness is!

4

An ingenuous mind feels in unmerited praise the bitterest reproof.

If you reject it you are unhappy, if you accept it you are undone.

4

No thoroughly occupied person was ever found really miserable.

4

Dignity, in private men and in governments, has been little else than a stately and stiff perseverance in oppression; and spirit, as it is called, little else than the foam of hard-mouthed insolence.

3

Was genius ever ungrateful? Mere talents are dry leaves, tossed up and down by gusts of passion, and scattered and swept away; but, Genius lies on the bosom of Memory, and Gratitude at her feet.

3
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