The greatest magnifying glasses in the world are a man's own eyes when they look upon his own person.

— Alexander Pope

The most beautiful Alexander Pope quotes that are simple and will have a huge impact on you

To err is human; to forgive, divine.

83

In faith and hope the world will disagree, but all mankind's concern is charity.

76

The best way to prove the clearness of our mind, is by showing its faults;

as when a stream discovers the dirt at the bottom, it convinces us of the transparency and purity of the water.

74

A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.

74

Chiefs who no more in bloody fights engage, But wise through time, and narrative with age, In summer-days like grasshoppers rejoice - A bloodless race, that send a feeble voice.

72

Teach me to feel another's woe, to hide the fault I see, that mercy I to others show, that mercy show to me.

71

While pensive poets painful vigils keep, Sleepless themselves, to give their readers sleep.

65

See! From the brake the whirring pheasant springs, And mounts exulting on triumphant wings; Short is his joy! He feels the fiery wound, Flutters in blood, and panting beats the ground.

62

To the Elysian shades dismiss my soul, where no carnation fades.

62

No louder shrieks to pitying heaven are cast, When husbands or lap-dogs breathe their last.

60

Genius creates, and taste preserves.

60

Satire's my weapon, but I'm too discreet To run amuck, and tilt at all I meet.

57

About Alexander Pope

Quotes 756 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Poet
Birthday May 21, 1688

Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise; My footstool earth, my canopy the skies.

53

But see, Orion sheds unwholesome dews;

Arise, the pines a noxious shade diffuse; Sharp Boreas blows, and nature feels decay, Time conquers all, and we must time obey.

50

Every woman is at heart a rake.

50

A little learning is a dangerous thing.

50

Our plenteous streams a various race supply, The bright-eyed perch with fins of Tyrian dye, The silver eel, in shining volumes roll'd, The yellow carp, in scales bedropp'd with gold, Swift trouts, diversified with crimson stains, And pikes, the tyrants of the wat'ry plains.

48

Modest plainness sets off sprightly wit, For works may have more with than does 'em good, As bodies perish through excess of blood.

48

Now hollow fires burn out to black, And lights are fluttering low: Square your shoulders, lift your pack And leave your friends and go. O never fear, lads, naught's to dread, Look not to left nor right: In all the endless road you tread There's nothing but the night.

48

The most positive men are the most credulous, since they most believe themselves, and advise most with their falsest flatterer and worst enemy--their own self-love.

48

No one should be ashamed to admit they are wrong, which is but saying, in other words, that they are wiser today than they were yesterday.

48

On life's vast ocean diversely we sail. Reasons the card, but passion the gale.

44

Strength of mind is exercise, not rest.

42

Of all the causes which conspire to blind Man's erring judgement, and misguide the mind, What the weak head with strongest bias rules, Is PRIDE, the never-failing vice of fools.

40

To be angry is to revenge the faults of others on ourselves.

40

Monuments, like men, submit to fate.

35

At every trifle take offense, that always shows great pride or little sense.

29

Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed was the ninth beatitude.

27

Say, will the falcon, stooping from above, Smit with her varying plumage, spare the dove? Admires the jay the insect's gilded wings? Or hears the hawk when Philomela sings?

27

Hills peep o'er hills, and Alps on Alps arise.

27

Never elated when someone's oppressed, never dejected when another one's blessed.

27

A tree is a nobler object than a prince in his coronation-robes.

26

Love the offender, yet detest the offense.

26

He who tells a lie is not sensible of how great a task he undertakes;

for he must be forced to invent twenty more to maintain that one.

25

All are but parts of one stupendous whole, Whose body Nature is, and God the soul.

24

Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.

23

How shall I lose the sin, yet keep the sense, and love the offender, yet detest the offence?

23

A brain of feathers, and a heart of lead.

22

The ruling passion, be it what it will. The ruling passion conquers reason still.

21

And, after all, what is a lie? 'Tis but the truth in a masquerade.

21

Charm strikes the sight, but merit wins the soul.

21

A pear-tree planted nigh: 'Twas charg'd with fruit that made a goodly show, And hung with dangling pears was every bough.

20

Then marble, soften'd into life, grew warm.

19

An excuse is worse than a lie, for an excuse is a lie, guarded.

19

On wrongs swift vengeance waits.

19

Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll; charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.

18

Remembrance and reflection how allied. What thin partitions divides sense from thought.

17

Calm, thinking villains, whom no faith could fix, Of crooked counsels and dark politics.

17

Fools admire, but men of sense approve.

17
famous quotes