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What are the best Charles Caleb Colton quotes? Charles Caleb Colton quotations on time, happiness, authors, writing, pride are those that make this writer famous. Here you can read the most famous quotes by Charles Caleb Colton sorted by user likes.

Best Charles Caleb Colton quotes

Friendship often ends in love; but love in friendship - never.

  • Love

No man is wise enough, or good enough to be trusted with unlimited power.

  • Power

True friendship is like sound health; the value of it is seldom known until it is lost.

  • friendship

Next to acquiring good friends, the best acquisition is that of good books.

  • Reading



It is the briefest yet wisest maxim which tells us to meddle not.

  • Argument

Nothing more completely baffles one who is full of tricks and duplicity than straight forward and simple integrity in another.

  • Integrity

The greatest friend of truth is Time, her greatest enemy is Prejudice, and her constant companion is humility.

  • Humility

We often pretend to fear what we really despise, and more often despise what we really fear.

  • Fear

Great minds must be ready not only to take opportunities, but to make them.

  • Opportunity

Men are born with two eyes, but only one tongue, in order that they should see twice as much as they say.

  • Sight

When millions applaud you seriously ask yourself what harm you have done; and when they disapprove you, what good.

  • Praise

Doubt is the vestibule through which all must pass before they can enter into the temple of wisdom.

  • Doubt

Money is the most envied, but the least enjoyed. Health is the most enjoyed, but the least envied.

  • Health

The intoxication of anger, like that of the grape, shows us to others, but hides us from ourselves.

  • Anger

Where we cannot invent, we may at least improve.

  • Progress

When we fail our pride supports us and when we succeed, it betrays us.

  • Success

To sentence a man of true genius, to the drudgery of a school is to put a racehorse on a treadmill.

  • Ability

Those that are the loudest in their threats are the weakest in their actions.

  • Conflict

We own almost all our knowledge not to those who have agreed but to those who have differed.

  • Knowledge

Patience is the support of weakness; impatience the ruin of strength

  • Patience

Nothing so completely baffles one who is full of trick and duplicity himself, than straightforward and simple integrity in another.

  • another

Men's arguments often prove nothing but their wishes.

  • Argument

Did universal charity prevail, earth would be a heaven, and hell a fable.

  • Charity

There are some frauds so well conducted that it would be stupidity not to be deceived by them.

  • Corruption

True friendship is like sound health, the value of it is seldom known until it be lost.

  • Friends

Honor is unstable and seldom the same; for she feeds upon opinion, and is as fickle as her food.

  • Honor

To despise our own species is the price we must often pay for knowledge of it.

  • Knowledge

Moderation is the inseparable companion of wisdom, but with it genius has not even a nodding acquaintance.

  • Moderation

There is this paradox in pride -- it makes some men ridiculous, but prevents others from becoming so.

  • Pride

There are three modes of bearing the ills of life, by indifference, by philosophy, and by religion.

  • Adversity


Charles Caleb Colton quotes images

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Where is Charles Caleb Colton from? Charles Caleb Colton is English. A recognized writer. The following quotations and images represent the English peculiarities embed in Charles Caleb Colton's character.

What Charles Caleb Colton was famous for? Charles Caleb Colton is famous writer with many good quotes. Wise sayings can be accessed and memorized. Charles Caleb Colton is well-known and respected in English society.

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Charles Caleb Colton quotes about time

What are the best time quotations by Charles Caleb Colton?

Time; that black and narrow isthmus between two eternities.

  • Time

Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time, which every day produces, and which most men throw away, but which nevertheless will make at the end of it no small deduction for the life of man.

  • Time

Time is the most undefinable yet paradoxical of things; the past is gone, the future is not come, and the present becomes the past even while we attempt to define it, and, like the flash of lightning, at once exists and expires.

  • Time

Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time which every day produces, and which most men throw away.

  • time

The present time has one advantage over every other - it is our own.

  • advantage

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Charles Caleb Colton quotes about happiness

What are the best happiness quotations by Charles Caleb Colton?

To be obliged to beg our daily happiness from others bespeaks a more lamentable poverty than that of him who begs his daily bread.

  • beg

There is this difference between happiness and wisdom, that he that thinks himself the happiest man, really is so; but he who thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.

  • Happiness

Happiness, that grand mistress of the ceremonies in the dance of life, impels us through all its mazes and meandering, but leads none of us by the same route

  • Happiness

Happiness, that grand mistress of the ceremonies in the dance of life, impels us through all its mazes and meanderings, but leads none of us by the same route.

  • ceremonies

There is this difference between happiness and wisdom: he that thinks himself the happiest man, really is so; but he that thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.

  • between

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Charles Caleb Colton quotes about authors

What are the best authors quotations by Charles Caleb Colton?

Our admiration of fine writing will always be in proportion to its real difficulty and its apparent ease.

  • Authors

To write what is worth publishing, to find honest people to publish it, and get sensible people to read it, are the three great difficulties in being an author.

  • Authors

Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason; they made no such demand upon those who wrote them.

  • Authors

The society of dead authors has this advantage over that of the living: they never flatter us to our faces, nor slander us behind our backs, nor intrude upon our privacy, nor quit their shelves until we take them down.

  • Authors

Justice to my readers compels me to admit that I write because I have nothing to do; justice to myself induces me to add that I will cease to write the moment I have nothing to say.

  • Authors

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Charles Caleb Colton quotes about writing

What are the best writing quotations by Charles Caleb Colton?

Our admiration of fine writing will always be in proportion to its real difficulty and its apparent ease.

  • Authors

To write what is worth publishing, to find honest people to publish it, and get sensible people to read it, are the three great difficulties in being an author.

  • Authors

Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason; they made no such demand upon those who wrote them.

  • Authors

The society of dead authors has this advantage over that of the living: they never flatter us to our faces, nor slander us behind our backs, nor intrude upon our privacy, nor quit their shelves until we take them down.

  • Authors

Justice to my readers compels me to admit that I write because I have nothing to do; justice to myself induces me to add that I will cease to write the moment I have nothing to say.

  • Authors

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Charles Caleb Colton quotes about pride

What are the best pride quotations by Charles Caleb Colton?

There is this paradox in pride -- it makes some men ridiculous, but prevents others from becoming so.

  • Pride

Of all the marvelous works of God, perhaps the one angels view with the most supreme astonishment, is a proud man.

  • Pride

To know a man, observe how he wins his object, rather than how he loses it; for when we fail, our pride supports; when we succeed; it betrays us.

  • Pride

To know a man, observe how he wins his object, rather than how he loses it; for when we fail, our pride supports us - when we succeed, it betrays us.

  • betrays

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More quotes by Charles Caleb Colton

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Constant success shows us but one side of the world; adversity brings out the reverse of the picture.

  • Adversity

Our admiration of fine writing will always be in proportion to its real difficulty and its apparent ease.

  • Authors

Grant graciously what you cannot refuse safely and conciliate those you cannot conquer.

  • Business

It is always safe to learn, even from our enemies; seldom safe to venture to instruct, even our friends.

  • Education



Friendship, of itself a holy tie, is made more sacred by adversity.

  • Friends

We hate some persons because we do not know them, and will not know them because we hate them.

  • Hate

Applause is the spur of noble minds, the end and aim of weak ones.

  • Praise

Bigotry murders religion to frighten fools with her ghost.

  • Prejudice

Secrecy is the soul of all great designs.

  • Soul

It is only when the rich are sick that they fully feel the impotence of wealth.

  • Wealth

We ask advice but we mean approbation.

  • Advice

It is with disease of the mind, as with those of the body; we are half dead before we understand our disorder, and half cured when we do.

  • Advice

He that will believe only what he can fully comprehend must have a long head or a very short creed.

  • Belief

If you would be known, and not know, vegetate in a village; if you would know, and not be known, live in a city.

  • City

Levity is often less foolish and gravity less wise than each of them appears.

  • Humor

Of all the marvelous works of God, perhaps the one angels view with the most supreme astonishment, is a proud man.

  • Pride

There is nothing more imprudent than excessive prudence.

  • Prudence

Silence is foolish if we are wise, but wise if we are foolish.

  • Silence

Pity is a thing often vowed, seldom felt; hatred is a thing often felt, seldom avowed.

  • Sympathy

Time; that black and narrow isthmus between two eternities.

  • Time

Many speak the truth when they say that they despise riches, but they mean the riches possessed by other men.

  • Wealth

The excess of our youth are checks written against our age and they are payable with interest thirty years later.

  • Age

Were we as eloquent as angels we still would please people much more by listening rather than talking.

  • Angels

To write what is worth publishing, to find honest people to publish it, and get sensible people to read it, are the three great difficulties in being an author.

  • Authors

Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason; they made no such demand upon those who wrote them.

  • Authors

Reply to wit with gravity, and to gravity with wit.

  • Conversation

Deliberate with caution, but act with decision; and yield with graciousness or oppose with firmness.

  • Decisions

Ladies of Fashion starve their happiness to feed their vanity, and their love to feed their pride.

  • Fashion

Tyrants have not yet discovered any chains that can fetter the mind.

  • Freedom

The drafts which true genius draws upon posterity, although they may not always be honored so soon as they are due, are sure to be paid with compound interest in the end.

  • Genius

None are so fond of secrets as those who do not mean to keep them.

  • Gossip

He that knows himself, knows others; and he that is ignorant of himself, could not write a very profound lecture on other men's heads.

  • Identity

Never join with your friend when he abuses his horse or his wife, unless the one is to be sold and the other to be buried.

  • Marriage

Corruption is like a ball of snow, once it's set a rolling it must increase.

  • Morals

Mystery is not profoundness.

  • Mystery

To dare to live alone is the rarest courage; since there are many who had rather meet their bitterest enemy in the field, than their own hearts in their closet.

  • Solitude

Theories are private property, but truth is common stock.

  • Truth

To be obliged to beg our daily happiness from others bespeaks a more lamentable poverty than that of him who begs his daily bread.

  • beg

He who studies books alone will know how things ought to be, and he who studies men will know how they are.

  • alone

Knowledge is two-fold, and consists not only in an affirmation of what is true, but in the negation of that which is false.

  • affirmation

The firmest friendships have been formed in mutual adversity, as iron is most strongly united by the fiercest flame

  • inspirational

Nothing more completely baffles one who is full of trick and duplicity, than straightforward and simple integrity in another.

  • another

Ambition makes the same mistake concerning power that avarice makes concerning wealth. She begins by accumulating power as a means to happiness, and she finishes by continuing to accumulate it as an end.

  • Ambition

The society of dead authors has this advantage over that of the living: they never flatter us to our faces, nor slander us behind our backs, nor intrude upon our privacy, nor quit their shelves until we take them down.

  • Authors

Justice to my readers compels me to admit that I write because I have nothing to do; justice to myself induces me to add that I will cease to write the moment I have nothing to say.

  • Authors

Physical courage, which engages all danger, will make a person brave in one way; and moral courage, which defies all opinion, will make a person brave in another.

  • Bravery

Posthumous charities are the very essence of selfishness, when bequeathed by those who. when alive, would not have contributed.

  • Charity

They that are loudest in their threats are the weakest in the execution of them. It is probable that he who is killed by lightning hears no noise; but the thunder-clap which follows, and which most alarms the ignorant, is the surest proof of their safety.

  • Conversation

Repartee is perfect when it effects its purpose with a double edge. It is the highest order of wit, as it indicates the coolest yet quickest exercise of genius, at a moment when the passions are roused.

  • Conversation

It is better to meet danger than to wait for it. He that is on a lee shore, and foresees a hurricane, stands out to sea and encounters a storm to avoid a shipwreck.

  • Danger

Death is the liberator of him whom freedom cannot release, the physician of him whom medicine cannot cure, and the comforter of him whom time cannot console.

  • Death

My lowest days as a Christian and There Were Low Ones--Seven Months Worth Of Them In Prison, To Be Exact have been more fulfilling and rewarding than all the days of glory in the White House.

  • Defeat

When the frustration of my helplessness seemed greatest, I discovered God's grace was more than sufficient. And after my imprisonment, I could look back and see how God used my powerlessness for His purpose. What He has chosen for my most significant witness was not my triumphs or victories, but my defeat.

  • Defeat

Times of great calamity and confusion have been productive for the greatest minds. The purest ore is produced from the hottest furnace. The brightest thunder-bolt is elicited from the darkest storm.

  • Determination

Commerce flourishes by circumstances, precarious, transitory, contingent, almost as the winds and waves that bring it to our shores.

  • Economics

Pedantry is the showy display of knowledge which crams our heads with learned lumber and then takes out our brains to make room for it.

  • Facts

Of present fame think little, and of future less; the praises that we receive after we are buried, like the flowers that are strewed over our grave, may be gratifying to the living, but they are nothing to the dead.

  • Fame

The family is the most basic unit of government. As the first community to which a person is attached and the first authority under which a person learns to live, the family establishes society's most basic values.

  • Family

Liberty will not descend to a people; a people must raise themselves to liberty; it is a blessing that must be earned before it can be enjoyed.

  • Freedom

Avarice has ruined more souls than extravagance.

  • Greed

There is this difference between happiness and wisdom, that he that thinks himself the happiest man, really is so; but he who thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.

  • Happiness

Happiness, that grand mistress of the ceremonies in the dance of life, impels us through all its mazes and meandering, but leads none of us by the same route

  • Happiness

Law and equity are two things which God has joined, but which man has put asunder.

  • Law

Life isn't like a book. Life isn't logical or sensible or orderly. Life is a mess most of the time. And theology must be lived in the midst of that mess.

  • Life

Logic is a large drawer, containing some useful instruments, and many more that are superfluous. A wise man will look into it for two purposes, to avail himself of those instruments that are really useful, and to admire the ingenuity with which those that are not so, are assorted and arranged.

  • Logic

If you cannot inspire a woman with love of you, fill her above the brim with love of herself; all that runs over will be yours.

  • Love

Love is an alliance of friendship and animalism; if the former predominates it is passion exalted and refined; if the latter, gross and sensual.

  • Love

Contemporaries appreciate the person rather than their merit, posterity will regard the merit rather than the person.

  • Memory

Our income are like our shoes; if too small, they gall and pinch us; but if too large, they cause us to stumble and trip.

  • Money

There are two principles of established acceptance in morals; first, that self-interest is the mainspring of all of our actions, and secondly, that utility is the test of their value.

  • Morals

Mystery magnifies danger, as a fog the sun, the hand that warned Belshazzar derived its horrifying effect from the want of a body.

  • Mystery

Opinions, like showers, are generated in high places, but they invariably descend into lower ones, and ultimately flow down to the people as rain unto the sea.

  • Opinion

Subtract from the great man all that he owes to opportunity, all that he owes to chance, and all that he gained by the wisdom of his friends and the folly of his enemies, and the giant will often be seen to be a pygmy.

  • Opportunity

To look back to antiquity is one thing, to go back to it is another.

  • Past

Philosophy is a bully that talks loud when the danger is at a distant; but, the moment she is pressed hard by an enemy, she is nowhere to be found and leaves the brunt of the battle to be fought by her steady, humble comrade, religion.

  • Philosophy

To know the pains of power, we must go to those who have it; to know its pleasures, we must go to those who are seeking it. The pains of power are real; its pleasures imaginary.

  • Power

Power will intoxicate the best hearts, as wine the strongest heads. No man is wise enough, nor good enough to be trusted with unlimited power.

  • Power

To know a man, observe how he wins his object, rather than how he loses it; for when we fail, our pride supports; when we succeed; it betrays us.

  • Pride

He that is good, will infallibly become better, and he that is bad, will as certainly become worse; for vice, virtue and time are three things that never stand still.

  • Progress

Examinations are formidable even to the best prepared, for the greatest fool may ask more than the wisest man can answer.

  • Questions

Books, like friends, should be few and well chosen. Like friends, too, we should return to them again and again for, like true friends, they will never fail us -- never cease to instruct -- never cloy.

  • Reading

There are two way of establishing a reputation, one to be praised by honest people and the other to be accused by rogues. It is best, however, to secure the first one, because it will always be accompanied by the latter.

  • Reputation

The two most precious things this side of the grave are our reputation and our life. But it is to be lamented that the most contemptible whisper may deprive us of the one, and the weakest weapon of the other.

  • Reputation

The consequences of things are not always proportionate to the apparent magnitude of those events that have produced them. Thus the American Revolution, from which little was expected, produced much; but the French Revolution, from which much was expected, produced little.

  • Results

Suicide sometimes proceeds from cowardice, but not always; for cowardice sometimes prevents it; since as many live because they are afraid to die, as die because they are afraid to live.

  • Suicide

He that thinks he is the happiest man, really is so. But he that thinks he is the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.

  • Thought

Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time, which every day produces, and which most men throw away, but which nevertheless will make at the end of it no small deduction for the life of man.

  • Time

Time is the most undefinable yet paradoxical of things; the past is gone, the future is not come, and the present becomes the past even while we attempt to define it, and, like the flash of lightning, at once exists and expires.

  • Time

As no roads are so rough as those that have just been mended, so no sinners are so intolerant as those that have just turned saints.

  • Tolerance

Wealth after all is a relative thing since he that has little and wants less is richer than he that has much and wants more.

  • Wealth

The mistakes of the fool are known to the world, but not to himself. The mistakes of the wise man are known to himself, but not to the world.

  • Wisdom

In America every woman has her set of girl-friends; some are cousins, the rest are gained at school. These form a permanent committee who sit on each other's affairs, who come out together, marry and divorce together, and who end as those groups of bustling, heartless well-informed club-women who govern society. Against them the Couple of Ehepaar is helpless and Man in their eyes but a biological interlude.

  • Women

In religion as in politics it so happens that we have less charity for those who believe half our creed, than for those who deny the whole of it.

  • believe

To know a man, observe how he wins his object, rather than how he loses it; for when we fail, our pride supports us - when we succeed, it betrays us.

  • betrays

True contentment depends not upon what we have; a tub was large enough for Diogenes, but a world was too little for Alexander.

  • alexander

We hate some persons because we do not know them; and will not know them because we hate them.

  • hate

He that has energy enough to root out a vice should go further, and try to plant a virtue in its place.

  • energy

Marriage is a feast where the grace is sometimes better than the dinner.

  • marriage

Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time which every day produces, and which most men throw away.

  • time

When you have nothing to say, say nothing.

  • quotes

Many speak the truth when they say that they despise riches, but they mean the riches possessed by others.

  • despise

We ask advice, but we mean approbation.

  • advice

Posthumous charities are the very essence of selfishness when bequeathed by those who, even alive, would part with nothing.

  • alive

Those who visit foreign nations, but associate only with their own country-men, change their climate, but not their customs. They see new meridians, but the same men; and with heads as empty as their pockets, return home with traveled bodies, but untravelled minds.

  • associate

Happiness, that grand mistress of the ceremonies in the dance of life, impels us through all its mazes and meanderings, but leads none of us by the same route.

  • ceremonies

There is this difference between happiness and wisdom: he that thinks himself the happiest man, really is so; but he that thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.

  • between

Physical courage, which despises all danger, will make a man brave in one way; and moral courage, which despises all opinion, will make a man brave in another.

  • another

Books, like friends, should be few and well chosen. Like friends, too, we should return to them again and again for, like true friends, they will never fail us - never cease to instruct - never cloy.

  • again

Our incomes should be like our shoes; if too small, they will gall and pinch us; but if too large, they will cause us to stumble and to trip.

  • cause

Patience is the support of weakness; impatience the ruin of strength.

  • patience

Men are born with two eyes, but with one tongue, in order that they should see twice as much as they say.

  • born

The present time has one advantage over every other - it is our own.

  • advantage

In life we shall find many men that are great, and some that are good, but very few men that are both great and good.

  • life

True friendship is like sound health; the value of it is seldom known until it be lost.

  • amity

There are three difficulties in authorship: to write anything worth publishing, to find honest men to publish it, and to find sensible men to read it.

  • anything

No company is preferable to bad. We are more apt to catch the vices of others than virtues, as disease is far more contagious than health.

  • apt

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

  • flattery

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Charles Caleb Colton is famous for his passion for time, happiness, authors, writing, pride. Check out great quotations and affirmations.


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When Charles Caleb Colton was born? Charles Caleb Colton was born on 1780.

Who is Charles Caleb Colton? Charles Caleb Colton biography. Charles Caleb Colton (1780–1832) was an English cleric, writer and collector, well known for his eccentricities. Colton was educated at Eton and King's College, graduating with a B.A. in 1801 and an M.A. in 1804. In 1801, he was presented by the college with the perpetual curacy of Tiverton's Prior's Quarter in Devon, where he lived for many years. He was appointed to the vicarage of Kew and Petersham in 1812. His performance of church-related functions at both locations was erratic: at times conscientious and brilliant while at other times cursory and indulgent. He left formal church service, and England, in 1828. Contemporaries believed that he had fled from his creditors, who took out a legal "docket" against him, identifying him as a wine-merchant. For two years Colton traveled throughout the United States. He later established a modest residence in Paris. There he invested in an art gallery and had a large private collection of valuable paintings. Other pastimes included wine collecting and partridge-shooting. He also frequented the gaming salons of the "Palais Royal" and was so successful that in a year or two he acquired the equivalent of 25,000 English pounds. He continued gambling, however, and lost his French fortune. At the time of his death, Colton was living on funds received from his immediate family. An illness required surgery, but Colton dreaded the operation. He eventually killed himself rather than undergo the procedure.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1
Introduction

Part 2
Best Charles Caleb Colton quotes
Top 10 quotes by Charles Caleb Colton

Part 3
Charles Caleb Colton quotes images

Part 4
Time
Happiness
Authors
Writing
Pride
All quotes

Part 5
Similar Writers

Part 6
Favorite topics

Part 7
Conclusion

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