I used to walk to school with my nose buried in a book.

— Jeremy Collier

The most blissful Jeremy Collier quotes that are life-changing and eye-opening

Temperance keeps the senses clear and unembarrassed, and makes them seize the object with more keenness and satisfaction. It appears with life in the face, and decorum in the person; it gives you the command of your head, and secures your health, and preserves you in a condition for business.

51

Emulation is a handsome passion; it is enterprising, but just withal. It keeps a man within the terms of honor, and makes the contest for glory just and generous. He strives to excel, but it is by raising himself, not by depressing others.

51

People's opinions of themselves are legible in their countenances.

50

As the language of the face is universal, so 'tis very comprehensive;

no laconism can reach it: 'Tis the short hand of the mind, and crowds a great deal in a little room

44

Fortitude implies a firmness and strength of mind, that enables us to do and suffer as we ought. It rises upon an opposition, and, like a river, swells the higher for having its course stopped.

27

Passing too eagerly upon a provocation loses the guard and lays open the body;

calmness and leisure and deliberation do the business much better.

14

Intemperance is a dangerous companion.

It throws many people off their guard, betrays them to a great many indecencies, to ruinous passions, to disadvantages in fortune; makes them discover secrets, drive foolish bargains, engage in play, and often to stagger from the tavern to the stews.

13

Atheism is the result of ignorance and pride;

of strong sense and feeble reasons; of good eating and ill-living. It is the plague of society, the corrupter of manners, and the underminer of property.

13

A man may as well expect to grow stronger by always eating as wiser by always reading.

12

Patient waiting is often the highest way of doing God's will.

8

Envy, like a cold prison, benumbs and stupefies;

and, conscious of its own impotence, folds its arms in despair.

7

Books support us in our solitude and keep us from being a burden to ourselves.

7

About Jeremy Collier

Quotes 67 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Clergyman
Birthday October 16

Perpetual pushing and assurance put a difficulty out of countenance and make a seeming difficulty gives way.

7

Rhetoric is nothing but reason well dressed and argument put in order.

6

Despair makes a despicable figure, and descends from a mean original.

'Tis the offspring of fear, of laziness and impatience; it argues a defect of spirit and resolution, and oftentimes of honesty, too. I would not despair unless I saw misfortune recorded in the book of fate, and signed and sealed by necessity.

5

A man by tumbling his thoughts, and forming them into expressions, gives them a new fermentation, which works them into a finer body.

5

True courage is a result of reasoning. A brave mind is always impregnable.

5

Those who despise fame seldom deserve it.

We are apt to undervalue the purchase we cannot reach, to conceal our poverty the better. It is a spark which kindles upon the best fuel, and burns brightest in the bravest breast.

5

The end of pleasure is to support the offices of life, to relieve the fatigues of business, to reward a regular action, and to encourage the continuance.

5

There are few things reason can discover with so much certainty and ease as its own insufficiency.

5

People who have nothing to do are quickly tired of their own company.

4

Vanity is a strong temptation to lying;

it makes people magnify their merit, over flourish their family, and tell strange stories of their interest and acquaintance.

4

Learning gives us a fuller conviction of the imperfections of our nature;

which one would think, might dispose us to modesty.

4

Envy is an ill-natured vice, and is made up of meanness and malice.

It wishes the force of goodness to be strained, and the measure of happiness abated. It laments over prosperity, and sickens at the sight of health. It oftentimes wants spirit as well as good nature.

3

Self-conceit is a weighty quality, and will sometimes bring down the scale when there is nothing else in it. It magnifies a fault beyond proportion, and swells every omission into an outrage.

3

By reading a man does, as it were, antedate his life, and make himself contemporary with the ages past; and this way of running up beyond one's nativity is better than Plato's pre-existence.

3

Confidence, as opposed, to modesty and distinguished from decent assurance, proceeds from self-opinion, and is occasioned by ignorance and flattery.

3

It is a difficult task to talk to the purpose, and to put life and perspicuity into our discourse.

3

Remorse of conscience is like an old wound;

a man is in no condition to fight under such circumstances. The pain abates his vigor and takes up too much of his attention.

3

Not that the moderns are born with more wit than their predecessors, but, finding the world better furnished at their coming into it, they have more leisure for new thoughts, more light to direct them, and more hints to work upon.

3

Knowledge is the consequence of time, and multitude of days are fittest to teach wisdom.

3

To believe a business impossible is the way to make it so.

How many feasible projects have miscarried through despondency, and been strangled in their birth by a cowardly imagination.

3

Prudence is a necessary ingredient in all the virtues, without which they degenerate into folly and excess.

3

Everyone has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases.

3

I would not despair unless I knew the irrevocable decree was passed;

saw my misfortune recorded in the book of fate, and signed and sealed by neces-sity.

3

True courage is the result of reasoning.

A brave mind is always impregnable. Resolution lies more in the head than in the veins, and a just sense of honor and of infamy, of duty and of religion, will carry us farther than all the force of mechanism.

3

Envy lies between two beings equal in nature though unequal in circumstances.

3

Conscience and covetousness are never to be reconciled;

like fire and water they always destroy each other, according to the predominancy of the element.

3

Books are but waste paper unless we spend in action the wisdom we get from thought -- asleep. When we are weary of the living, we may repair to the dead, who have nothing of peevishness, pride, or design in their conversation.

2

Without discretion, people may be overlaid with unreasonable affection, and choked with too much nourishment.

2

Envy is of all others the most ungratifying and disconsolate passion.

There is power for ambition, pleasure for luxury, and pelf even for covetousness; but envy gets no reward but vexation.

1

What sun is there within us that shoots his rays with so sudden a vigor? To see the soul flash in the face at this rate one would think would convert an atheist. By the way, we may observe that smiles are much more becoming than frowns. This seems a natural encouragement to good-humor; as much as to say, if people have a mind to be handsome, they must not be peevish and untoward.

0

What can be more honorable than to have courage enough to execute the commands of reason and conscience,--to maintain the dignity of our nature, and the station assigned us?

0

Books are a guide in youth, and an entertainment for age.

They support us under solitude, and keep us from being a burden to ourselves. They help us to forget the crossness of men and things, compose our cares and our passions, and lay our disappointments asleep. When we are weary of the living, we may repair to the dead, who have nothing of peevishness, pride or design in their conversation.

0

The road to heaven lies as near by water as by land.

0

Heroes are a mischievous race.

0

Idleness is an inlet to disorder, and makes way for licentiousness.

People who have nothing to do are quickly tired of their own company.

0

How many feasible projects have miscarried through despondency, and been strangled in their birth by a cowardly imagination.

0

We must not let go manifest truths because we cannot answer all questions about them.

0
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