In some ways, I never outgrew my adolescence. I wake up in the morning and think, 'Oh my God, I'm late for a math test!' But then I say, 'Wait a minute. I'm 40.

— Daniel Clowes

The most captivate Daniel Clowes quotes that are simple and will have a huge impact on you

You try to make the world a better place and what does it get you? I mean, Christ, how the hell does one man stand a chance against four billion assholes?

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I was a very fearful little kid, and I would always see the worst in everything.

The glass was half-empty. I would see people kissing, and I would think one was trying to bite the other.

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I think I'm gonna attach myself to the sinking ship that is book publishing.

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When you see somebody who's got a complaining personality, it usually means that they had some vision of what things could be, and they're constantly disappointed by that. I think that would be the camp that I would fall into - constantly horrified by the things people do.

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I believe in the transformative power of cinema.

It is only through this shared dream-experience that we can transcend the oppressive minutiae of daily existence and find some spiritual connection in the deeper reality of our mutual desire.

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One of my weekend hobbies is to go look at old houses when there are open houses around here. Just to go look at the architecture. And you can see how many houses were built around 1977, the year where everyone said, "Let's put in these aluminum windows instead of beautiful hand-made wood ones."

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I have this certain vision of the way I want my comics to look;

this sort of photographic realism, but with a certain abstraction that comics can give. It's kind of a fine line.

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Everybody just lets the media do their thinking for them.

.. that's why you'll never hear any reggae on the radio!

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It's much more liberating as a artist to feel like you can approach each page and each panel with the way that inspires you the most. I think the thing that bogs down a lot of artists is that you're kind of stuck drawing in a style you've developed.

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It's embarrassing to be involved in the same business as the mainstream comic thing. It's still very embarrassing to tell other adults that I draw comic books - their instant, preconceived notions of what that means.

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Face it, you hate every single boy on the face of the Earth!" "That's not TRUE, I just hate all these obnoxious, extroverted, pseudo-bohemian art-school losers

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The trouble is the kind of guy I want to go out with doesn't even exist.

.. Like a rugged, chain-smoking, intellectual, adventurer guy who's really serious, but also really funny and mean.

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About Daniel Clowes

Quotes 92 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Author
Birthday October 16

Film is a director's medium, and a film set is a complicated military structure - I have to keep reminding myself to stay in my place, or all will burst into chaos.

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When I go back and reread the stuff, I'm always floored by how deeply personal and revealing it actually is.

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There are certain comics that just seem like they have this perfect balance between dialogue and image that I can't not read. I'll want to save it for later, and the next thing I know, I'm reading it. That's what I'm kind of trying to do with my comics.

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Even if I only had 10 readers, I'd rather do the book for them than for a million readers online.

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I was 30 before I made a living that was not embarrassing.

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I think politics has an influence on my work now, perhaps more so than when I was a childless young man, but I hope never to deal with these kinds of issues in anything more than a covert manner. I'm more interested in figuring out what I think than in pronouncing my views to the world.

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Comics seldom move me the way I would be moved by a novel or movie.

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I just try to make comics for myself, try to give it some kind of unity throughout. That often involves tiny details. I'm never sure what's going to be obvious or what nobody will ever notice. I put stuff in my comics that I thought was blatantly obvious, and nobody noticed. And things that I think are buried in the background, everybody gets it. So I try to be consistently aware of every part of the frame.

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I've felt that in the past, where I just felt like I had to keep drawing in the same way to maintain this sameness and rhythm throughout an entire book, and it was not really necessary.

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Something I always wanted to do, to capture that later half of the '70s.

It's like the early half of the '70s is still the '60s, in that there's still kind of a playfulness and inventiveness in terms of design and the things that were going on in the culture. The second half, it got much more commodified. It's possibly the ugliest era of architecture and clothes and design in the entire 20th century, from 1975 to '81 or '82.

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For me, the whole process involves envisioning this Ghost World comic book in my head as I'm working.

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I think a comic looks better in the magazine.

The colors are designed to be on paper, not illuminated on screen. I don't like the aspect of people reading it for free. When people get things for free, they tend to not take them as seriously. But I don't know. I'm sure 10 times more people are reading it online than in the actual paper.

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Often I'll do research just to get a time period correct, but I didn't have to for the '70s... I feel like I can close my eyes and still see it so clearly.

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It's hard to tell if anyone's interested in reading a serialized story.

But it's interesting to put in a cliffhanger each week. That was popular in old comic strips. They'd write a weekend story different from the daily strip. So people follow one story day to day, and a separate story on weekends. If you read them, you think "I'll read two more." Then you're like "I gotta find out!" And you read 500 more.

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I'm always hiding the books in my closet, and my art's always turned upside down in my drawer.

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I was thinking the other day that there will never be another form of music that everybody has to respond to - like disco.

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Alfred Hitchcock talked about planning out his movies so meticulously that when he was actually shooting and editing, it was the most boring thing in the world. But drawing comics isn't like shooting a movie. You can shoot a movie in a few days and be done with it, but drawing a comic takes years and years... That's the biggest part of doing comics: You have to create stuff that makes you want to get out of bed every morning and get to work.

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All I can say on the Guilford story - and this comes more from my perspective as a father than an artist - is for parents and administrators to give so little value to the career of a public-school teacher - to allow him to be cast aside without exhausting every avenue to resolve the issue - is an obscenity worse than anything I've ever drawn in my comics.

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I think there was a point that I realized I could do what I wanted to do in terms of the drawing. I used to run around a lot of things. I would shy away from certain things that I realized would be horrible for me to draw, and just wouldn't be fun.

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As soon as I'm finished with it, it feels like an impersonal project.

Like, "Well, I did another book."

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I never feel there's anything I can't do with comics.

There are certain things in comics that you can't do in any other medium: for instance, in Mister Wonderful, Marshall's narration overlaps the events as they're going on. That would be difficult in film; you could blot speech out with a voiceover, but it wouldn't have the same effect. That's always of interest, to see what new things you can do in comics form.

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I think I have a very clear vision of what I want things to look like.

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You need to be, like, turning down high-paying illustration work because you want to work on your comic. That's when you know you're doing something good.

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I'm always looking for things I imagine must exist, but don't - this is usually the impetus to create that thing myself.

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In a movie, you have to be mindful that no budget is going to be able to deal with running around the globe at every whim of the writer.

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But I enjoy the opportunity to use swear symbols.

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It keeps me moving when I see people doing stuff that I see as "my" direction.

I think, "Oh, it's been tainted. Now I've got to do something new." There's nothing worse than working on your own stuff and thinking that someone else is following you along.

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Writing screenplays is very freeing from what you can do in comics in a lot of ways. You can change things around. I can take great delight in writing 40 pages, then just pressing delete and getting rid of it and not thinking about it ever again. Whereas in comics, if I had put that kind of effort into it, I couldn't go on.

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I don't read much of anything online.

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I'm usually the last to see my influence in other people's work.

People give me stuff and say "Oh look, this guy's ripping you off," and I'm like "What do you mean?" Often I see the people that I've ripped off filtered into my own work. In other people's work, I can only see specific, tiny little instances of inflections stolen from another artist.

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Before I could read, I remember trying to piece together the stories from the images. It was a very primal experience.

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I try to employ a different strategy for each story.

Often, I'll have a specific look in mind before I even have the story to go with it. I'm not so much interested in forcing the issue of reader identification through various graphic tricks. I'm more interested in creating specific characters that resonate with my own particular inner struggles.

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My feeling is that it's one of the very few things that comics can do that you really can't do in any other medium. I feel like the reader accepts all of these styles, and after a certain point you can flip the pages and see a character rendered very differently than you saw on an earlier page, and it's not jarring. It suggests things that you can't suggest just in the writing or in the plotting.

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If you think about it enough to have a really articulate answer, you're not doing it right. That's how I feel about art. If your thought process could take you to knowing exactly what you're doing and why, there would be no point in making the art. It would become like propaganda. It's more nebulous than that.

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I must have been 3 years old or less, and I remember paging through these comics, trying to figure out the stories. I couldn't read the words, so I made up my own stories.

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I think that's what we're all most terrified about: that we'll just die and disappear and we'll leave no trace.

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For example, I noticed that every single kid in the high school in 'The Death-Ray' is based on somebody I went to high school with.

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