Felicity, not fluency of language, is a merit.

— Edwin Percy Whipple

The most viral Edwin Percy Whipple quotes that are life-changing and eye-opening

As men neither fear nor respect what has been made contemptible, all honor to him who makes oppression laughable as well as detestable. Armies cannot protect it then; and walls which have remained impenetrable to cannon have fallen before a roar of laughter or a hiss of contempt.

42

Of the three prerequisites of genius; the first is soul; the second is soul; and the third is soul.

22

The contemplation of beauty in nature, in art, in literature, in human character, diffuses through our being a soothing and subtle joy, by which the heart's anxious and aching cares are softly smiled away.

21

Cheerfulness in most cheerful people is the rich and satisfying result of strenuous discipline.

20

Irony is an insult conveyed in the form of a compliment.

11

Books are lighthouses erected in the great sea of time.

11

God is glorified, not by our groans, but by our thanksgivings.

6

Grit is the grain of character. It may generally be described as heroism materialized,--spirit and will thrust into heart, brain, and backbone, so as to form part of the physical substance of the man.

6

Some men find happiness in gluttony and in drunkenness, but no delicate viands can touch their taste with the thrill of pleasure, and what generosity there is in wine steadily refuses to impart its glow to their shriveled hearts.

5

God is glorified, not by our groans, but our thanksgivings;

and all good thought and good action claim a natural alliance with good cheer.

5

Nature does not capriciously scatter her secrets as golden gifts to lazy pets and luxurious darlings, but imposes tasks when she presents opportunities, and uplifts him whom she would inform. The apple that she drops at the feet of Newton is but a coy invitation to follow her to the stars.

5

Dignity is often a veil between us and the real truth of things.

5

About Edwin Percy Whipple

Quotes 79 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Writer
Birthday October 16

Sin, every day, takes out a patent for some new invention.

4

The inborn geniality of some people amounts to genius.

3

Talent jogs to conclusions to which Genius takes giant leaps.

3

Wit is an unexpected explosion of thought.

3

God, in His wrath, has not left this world to the mercy of the subtlest dialectician; and all arguments are happily transitory in their effect when they contradict the primal intuitions of conscience and the inborn sentiments of the heart.

3

Character is the spiritual body of the person, and represents the individualization of vital experience, the conversion of unconscious things into self-conscious men.

3

Wit implies hatred or contempt of folly and crime, produces its effects by brisk shocks of surprise, uses the whip of scorpions and the branding-iron, stabs, stings, pinches, tortures, goads, teases, corrodes, undermines.

3

Talent is full of thoughts, Genius is thought. Talent is a cistern, Genius a fountain.

3

The greatness of action includes immoral as well as moral greatness--Cortes and Napoleon, as well as Luther and Washington.

3

The saddest failures in life are those that come from not putting forth the power and will to succeed.

3

Lord Chatham and Napoleon were ns much actors as Garrick or Talma.

Now, an imposing air should always be taken as evidence of imposition. Dignity is often a veil between us and the real truth of things.

3

Genius may be almost defined as the faculty of acquiring poverty.

3

From Lucifer to Jerry Sneak there is not an aspect of evil, imperfection, and littleness which can elude the lights of humor or the lightning of wit.

3

A man of letters is often a man with two natures,--one a book nature, the other a human nature. These often clash sadly.

3

Nothing really succeeds which is not based on reality;

sham, in a large sense, is never successful. In the life of the individual, as in the more comprehensive life of the State, pretension is nothing and power is everything.

3

We like the fine extravagance of that philosopher who declared that no man was as rich as all men ought to be.

3

Every style formed elaborately on any model must be affected and straight-laced.

3

The bitterest satires and noblest eulogies on married life have come from poets.

3

Do we, mad as we all are after riches, hear often enough from the pulpit the spirit of those words in which Dean Swift, in his epitaph on the affluent and profligate Colonel Chartres, announces the small esteem of wealth in the eyes of God, from the fact of His thus lavishing it upon the meanest and basest of His creatures?

3

Nature and society are so replete with startling contrasts that wit often consists in the mere statement and comparison of facts, as when Hume says that the ancient Muscovites wedded their wives with a whip instead of a ring.

3

The essence of the ludicrous consists in surprise,--in unexpected terms of feeling and explosions of thought,--often bringing dissimilar things together with a shock; as when some wit called Boyle, the celebrated philosopher, the father of chemistry and brother of the Earl of Cork.

3

Heroism is no extempore work of transient impulse--a rocket rushing fretfully up to disturb the darkness by which, after a moment's insulting radiance, it is ruthlessly swallowed up,--but a steady fire, which darts forth tongues of flame. It is no sparkling epigram of action, but a luminous epic of character.

3

There is a serious and resolute egotism that makes a man interesting to his friends and formidable to his opponents.

2

Men educate each other in reason by contact or collision, and keep each other sane by the very conflict of their separate hobbies. Society as a whole is the deadly enemy of the particular crotchet of each, and solitude is almost the only condition in which the acorn of conceit can grow to the oak of perfect self-delusion.

2

Whenever you find humour, you find pathos close by its side.

1

Tears are copiously showered over frailties the discoverer takes a malicious delight in circulating; and thus, all granite on one side of the heart, and all milk on the other, the unsexed scandal-monger hies from house to house, pouring balm from its weeping eyes on the wounds it inflicts with its stabbing tongue.

1

Humor, warm and all-embracing as the sunshine, bathes its objects in a genial and abiding light.

0

What a man does with his wealth depends upon his idea of happiness.

Those who draw prizes in life are apt to spend tastelessly, if not viciously; not knowing that it requires as much talent to spend as to make.

0

Cervantes shrewdly advises to lay a bridge of silver for a flying enemy.

0

Knowledge, like religion, must be experienced in order to be known.

0

Even in social life, it is persistency which attracts confidence, more than talents and accomplishments.

0

A large portion of human beings live not so much in themselves as in what they desire to be. They create what is called an ideal character, in an ideal form, whose perfections compensate in some degree for the imperfections of their own.

0

A politician weakly and amiably in the right, is no match for a politician tenaciously and pugnaciously in the wrong.

0

In activity we must find our joy as well as glory;

and labor, like everything else that is good, is its own reward.

0

An epigram often flashes light into regions where reason shines but dimly.

0

The universal line of distinction between the strong and the weak is that one persists; the other hesitates, falters, trifles, and at last collapses or "caves in.

0

True wisdom, indeed, springs from the wide brain which is fed from the deep heart; and it is only when age warms its withering conceptions at the memory of its youthful fire, when it makes experience serve aspiration, and knowledge illumine the difficult paths through which thoughts thread their way into facts,--it is only then that age becomes broadly and nobly wise.

0
famous quotes