I place no hope in my strength, nor in my works: but all my confidence is in God my protector, who never abandons those who have put all their hope and thought in him.

— Francois Rabelais

The most skyrocket Francois Rabelais quotes to discover and learn by heart

We always long for the forbidden things, and desire what is denied us.

53

A habit does not a monk make.

48

Tell the truth and shame the devil.

36

When I drink, I think; and when I think, I drink.

29

Keep running after a dog and he will never bite you.

26

A child is not a vase to be filled, but a fire to be lit.

24

If the skies fall, one may hope to catch larks.

22

If you wish to avoid seeing a fool, you must first break your mirror

20

Gestures, in love, are incomparably more attractive, effective and valuable than words.

19

You have no obligation under the sun other than to discover your real needs, to fulfill them, and to rejoice in doing so.

18

Appetite comes with eating.....but thirst goes away with drinking.

16

One falls to the ground in trying to sit on two stools.

16

About Francois Rabelais

Quotes 159 sayings
Nationality French
Profession Clergyman
Birthday October 16

It is my feeling that Time ripens all things;

with Time all things are revealed; Time is the father of truth.

15

Science without conscience is the soul's perdition.

14

The scent of wine, oh how much more agreeable, laughing, praying, celestial and delicious it is than that of oil!

14

I drink no more than a sponge.

13

A war undertaken without sufficient monies has but a wisp of force.

Coins are the very sinews of battles.

12

I never sleep comfortably except when I am at sermon or when I pray to God.

12

Gargantua, at the age of four hundred four score and forty- four years begat his son Pantagruel, from his wife, named Badebec, daughter of the King of the Amaurotes in Utopia, who died in child-birth: because he was marvelously huge and so heavy that he could not come to light without suffocating his mother.

10

There is no truer cause of unhappiness amongst men than, where naturally expecting charity and benevolence, they receive harm and vexation.

9

Draw the curtain, the fraud is over.

9

Half the world does not know how the other half lives.

8

Remove idleness from the world and soon the arts of Cupid would perish.

8

Debts and lies are generally mixed together.

8

No clock is more regular than the belly.

7

There are more old drunkards than old physicians.

7

Frugality is for the vulgar.

6

The deed will be accomplished with the least amount of bloodshed possible, and, if possible ..., we'll save all the souls and send them happily off to their abode.

6

A good intention does not mean honor. [Fr., A bon entendeur ne faut qu'un parole.]

6

So much is a man worth as he esteems himself.

6

Machination is worth more than force.

6

How do you know antiquity was foolish? How do you know the present is wise? Who made it foolish? Who made it wise?

5

The probity that scintillizes in the superfices of your persons informs my ratiocinating faculty, in a most stupendous manner, of the radiant virtues latent within the precious caskets and ventricles of your minds.

5

I am going to seek a great purpose, draw the curtain, the farce is played.

5

I'd rather write about laughing than crying, For laughter makes men human, and courageous.

5

Nature abhors a vacuum.

5

Bring down the curtain, the farce is over

5

Time, which wears down and diminishes all things, augments and increases good deeds, because a good turn liberally offered to a reasonable man grows continually through noble thought and memory.

4

Hungry bellies have no ears. [Fr., La ventre affame n'point d'oreilles.]

4

How shall I be able to rule over others, that have not full power and command of myself?

4

Because just as arms have no force outside if there is no counsel within a house, study is vain and counsel useless that is not put to virtuous effect when the time calls.

4

Misery is the company of lawsuits.

4

He who has not an adventure has not horse or mule, so says Solomon.

--Who is too adventurous, said Echephron,--loses horse and mule.

4

Petite ville, grand renom. Small town, great renown.

4

It's a shame to be called "educated" those who do not study the ancient Greek writers.

4

I am going to seek a great perhaps.

4

Always open all gates and roads to your enemies, and rather make for them a bridge of silver, to get rid of them. [Fr., Ouvrez toujours a vos ennemis toutes les portes et chemin, et plutot leur faites un pont d'argent, afin de les renvoyer.]

4

The farce is finished. I go to seek a vast perhaps.

3

Believe me, 'tis a godlike thing to lend; to owe is a heroic virtue.

3
famous quotes